100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 05, 1941 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FAQ; Q, I"V

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

9'ATURI)Ail, APRIj,

*

Architeets Set Monday
For Tryouts On Council
Tryouts for positlions on the Arch-.
itectural Council will be held at
5 p.m. Monday in Room 247, Arch-
itecture Building, according to Paul
Rogers, '41A, present publicity
chairman of the Council.
Any scholastically eligible student
of the architecture college may try-
out for the council. Positions are
open in the fields of business, finance,
new activities, maintenance, publi-
city, records and social activities.

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
TYPIST-Experienced. L. M. Hey-
wood, 414 Maynard St. Phone 5689.
27c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE - PACKING
Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 6297
29c
RIDE HOME in one of our trans-
portation bargaiis. With a car
full, expenses are much less than
buying a ticket. Come to Cushing
Motor Sales, 400 W. Washington,
Telephone 5640. 332
FOR RENT

Debate Finals
To Take Place
IereApril 25
Albion, Detroit Mackenzie
High Schools Will Meet
In Championship Match
Albion and Mackenzie High School
of Detroit will meet in the State
Championship Debate to be held
April 25 in Hill Auditorium as a part
of the annual Forensic _Day under
he auspices of Michigan High School
Forensic Association headed by Ar-
thur Secord of the speech depart-
ment.
Special entertainment will be of-
fered to the hundreds of high school
students who will gather for the out-
standing speech contest of the state.
Albion High School will take the af-
firmative and Mackenzie will take the
negative of the question, "Resolved:
that the power of federal government
should be decreased."
Judges for the debate include Prof.
G. E. Densmore of the speech de-
partment, Prof. Carl 'Brandt, of the
speech department, and Prof. Wilbur
E. Gilman, chairman of the speech
department of the University of Mis-
souri and president of the Central
States Speech Association.
Chairman of the debate vill be
Dean Erich A. Walterdof the literary
college.
The University Band will present a
half hour concert in Hill Auditorum
preceding the debate. A special East-
ern Conference baseball game will be
played before high school students
attending the championship debate.

By CHARLES THATCHER
On extended leave to teach at the
University of the Philippines, Prof.
R. S. Swinton, of thehengineering
mechanics department here, is now
serving as secretary of the American
Coordinating Committee, one of the
nuclei of Philippine civilian defense,
accordinj to word received here re-
cently.
Slamming up the Japanese-Phili-
ppine situation, Professor Swinton
quoted the American Mercury maga-
zine, writing that "the U.S. is facing
a grave danger in the Far East. The
danger is not made in Tokyo. It is
made in Washington, Philadelphia,
Chicago and a thousand towns the
size of Booneville, Ind.
Danger Is Discounted
"That danger is not the peril of a
military defeat or, for that matter,I
the hazard of a first class fight. ItI
is rather the danger of running away
from a clean cut obligation. -But
the Japs do believe that Americans
are peace-loving, gullible, soft, grasp-
ing, and stupid enough to go on sell-
ing them war materials and to go
on with wordy protests when these1
materials are used."
Should war break out in the Is-
Students Asked
To Iuve4tit ate
Co-op Houses

lands while Professor Swinton is con-
nected with the University there, he
is to report to the Department of
Docks, Harbors and Airports in Ca-
vite, he writes.,The Islands are con-
tinually expanding their armed forc-.
es, and it is expected that the gov-
ernment will take over the literay
college at Baguio soon, for use as
part of their "West Point."
"While you might consider the!
people uncultured because they dif-
fer from you, the student here repre-
sents a much wealthier group than
in the U.S.," he said. "Only five per
cent work to earn money. One young
instructor keeps his Packard car and
a chauffeur constantly at the door."
Students Are Very Serious
As for, the University itself, Pro-
fessor Swinton reports that the stu-
dents are very serious, and that ex-,
tra exams and bluebooks given at
night or Saturday afternoons "get
100 per cent attendance and no com-
plaints (audible)." However, he adds
that the "young man is not trusted,
so the returning scholars have little
voice;--but that is Oriental."
A sign that life in the Philippines
may not be so romantic as some
might wish to picture it may be found
in the statement that "men die rap-
idly here, once away from the stim-
ulus of America."
Sent to the Islands last August,
Professor Swinton recently was grant-
ed an extended leave, and will con-
tinue his work in the College of En-
gineering there until October.

Ford Obtains Injunction Against UAW

America Faces Grave Danger
In Philippines, Sin ton Writes

Music Faculty
To Give Recital
Group Will Present Final
Concert Tomorrow
Compositions by Haydn, Joseph
Marx, Hindemith and Vaughan Wil-
liams will be played by eight mem-
bers of the School of Music faculty
in the last Faculty Concert of the
year at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Participating in the program will
be Prof. Wassily Besekirsky, violin-
ist; Prof. Joseph Brinkman, pianist;
Prof. Arthur Hackett, tenor; Prof.
Thelma Lewis, soprano; Prof. An-
thony Whitmire, violinist; Prof.
Hanns Pick, violoncellist; Thelma
Newefl, violinist, and Helen Titus,
pianist.
Featured selection on the program
will be Williams' "On Wenlock Edge"
which is based upon five well known
poems by A. E. Housman, "From Far,
From Eve and Morning," "Is My
Team Ploughing," "Oh, When I Was
In Love With You," "Bredon Hill,"
and "Clun." The piece is designed
for solo voice, piano and string,
quartet.
Colored Movies Planned
Colored movies of Argentina, Bra-
zil and Central America will be
shown at the weekly 'Sunday eve-
ning program of the International
Center in Room 316 of the Union.
The program of movies is open to
all students and faculty members in-
terested in Latin-America, The films
will follow the regular Sunday eve-
ning supper served in the Center.

I. A. Capizzi, attorney for the Ford Motor Company, reads a tempo-
rary injunction issued in Detroit restraining the CIO's United Auto-
mobile Workers from interfering with Ford workers. Federal Judge
Arthur J. Tuttle, Who issued the injunction, said there was "a great
emergency."
Schoolmasters' Club Will Hold
76th Meeting Here April 24-26

I

FOR RENT: Campus, Nicely Furn-
ished, 3 room front Apt. Electric
stove, refrigerator, private bath.
Adults. 602 Monroe.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3cx
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe. Laundry, 226
South First St., Phone 3916. Wc
STUDENT BUNDLES-3 shirts, 3'
pairs of sox, 6 handkerchiefs fin-
ished, 2 suits underwear, 2 bath
towels, 1 pajama suit fluffed-99c.
Ace Hand Laundry, 1114 S. Uni-
versity. 15c
LOST and FOUND
LOST: Tri Delta Pin, March 23. Be-l
tween League and 1920 Norway'
Road. Phone 9654 or 2-3203.
BLACK ZIPPER KEY CASE with
Stockwell dormitory keys and
stamps. Call Louise Engell, 2-4471.
333
MISCELLANEOUS
_____________________ ____________________________________-~__

er
p.
ic
ti
in
T
le
icl
lea
Se
the
loc
of
a r
in
cd
pea
dad
is
-,,er

THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing. ial
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19cbo
BEN THE TAILOR-Get my price'the
for your used clothes. Call 5387 to
after 6 p.m. ic or
EXPERT HOSIERY and garment re- mn
pair. Reasonable rates. Weave-Bac St
Shop-Upstairs in Nickels Arcade. m
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL- mi
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles. are
Killins Gravel Company, phone boa
7112. Sc boa
STOCKWELL residents - Skilled al- con
terations promptly done. Just cis
across- the street. Phone 2-2678.I
A. Graves. 28c wi
rea
HEATING and PLUMBING the
PLUMBING & HEATING-Let Sam vo
C. Andres make your needed re- Th
pairs over the holidays. Phone da
7102. 30c bo
WANTED TO BUY--4
WANTED - ANY OLD OR NEW t
CLOTHING, PAY FROM $5.00 TO di
$500.00 FOR SUITS, OVER- T
COATS, TYPEWRITERS, FURS- W
PERSIANS, MINKS. PHONE ANN le
ARBOR 6304 FOR APPOINT- pj
MENTS. SAM. a
N/
//r
/l
r'
/l

-4onscripit Act
Appeal Cases
Are Explained
Editor's Note : In response to, sev-
ral requests, The Daily is resuming
,ublication of various Selective Serv-
e information, answering some of
he questions which have been raised
aregard to certain draft problems.
'oday's article discusses the prob-
m of appealing decisions made by
cal draft boards.
Dne or the least publicized and
Et known provision in the Selective
rvice Act is the section devoted to
eappealing of determinations of
gal draft boards to either a board
appeals or to the president. As
esult, there have been a few cases i
which individuals have been draft-i
who should have been deferred.
['hose who desire to make an. ap -
al are required to do so within fiv e
ys after a notice of classification'a
received or after a personal in-
'iwis given. Occasionally a spec-
.extension is given by the draft
ard.
Appeals may be made by eitherl
eregistrant, any person who claims
be a dependent of the registrant
a government appeal agent with-
this time limit. The Director orI
ate Director of Selective Service
,y take an appeal at any time.
Special forms must be used to sub-
it these appeals after which they
e sent to the chairman of .the local
ard who will refer them to the
and of appeals. The latter will then
rsider the appeal and make its de-
ion.
If the registrant is still dissatisfied
th the decision which has been
ached, he may take an appeal to
e President providing his case in-
Ives the question of dependency.
ais appeal must be made within five
Lys after the determination of the
,ard of appeal is received.
Students desiring any informia-
ion relating to any phase of the
Iraft may write to The Daily.
these articles are being written
with the cooperation of Prof. Char-
es M. Davis of the geography de-
artment, student Selective Service
dviser.

Seventy-sixth annual meeting of
the Michigan Schoolmasters' Club
will be held April 24, 25 and 26 in
Ann Arbor for superintendents of
schools and educators throughout the
state and nation.
The theme of the general confer-
ence will be "What the High School
Ought to Teach." This topic will be
considered in the ten roundtables of
the general conference.
Judd To Speak April 25
Dr. Charles Judd, former dean of
the School of Education of the Uni-
versity of Chicago and one of the
most well-known national educators,
will address the reception and ban-
quet of the Club on "Youth Educa-
tion in America" April 25, in the Un-
ion.
The conference will be opened by
Dr. L. L. Forsythe, principal of Ann
Arbor High School, who is president
of the state organization. The dis-
cussion of the conference theme will
be keynoted by Dr. Thomas H. Briggs
of Columbia University and led by
Prof. Hayward Keniston of the ro-
mance languages department and
John R. Barnes of Grosse Pointe. I
Saturday' Conference
The Saturday morning conference
will center on the topic, "What the
High Schools Do Teach," led by
Prof. George E. Carrothers, director,
of the Bureau of Cooperation with
Educational Institutions.
The second Saturday meeting will
be held on "The Most Promising
Frontiers in the Education of Amer-

ican Youth Today" and will be in-
troduced by Dr. Judd.
During the morning there will also
be roundtables on better health, bet-
ter thinking, better workmanship and
better citizenship.t
Nineteen statewide 'organizations
in particular fields of subject matter
and administration will also con-
vene. These include the art, biologi-
cal, business education, classical, edu-
cation, English, general science, geo-
graphy, guidance, !health and physi-
cal education, mathematics, modern
language, music, physics-chemistry-
astronomy, school library, and social
studies."
In the field of administration the
Administrative Teachers' Conference
and the Conference of Deans and the
Advisers of Women, will convene.

iiiw I

I

Cleveland Al m rnnae
Offer Tuition GrantI
A partial tuition scholarship ofj
$75 will be awarded this spring by the
Michigan Alumnae group of Cleve-
land, Ohio, to a woman student whose
home is in that city.
The scholarship is offered annually,
preferably to a member of the junior
or senior class, on the basis of a good
academic record on campus. Former
recipients of the award have been
Salley Kenny, '38, Zenovia Skoratko,
'40, and Dorothy Ragla, '41.
Applications may be obtained at
the Alumnae Council Office in the
Michigan League and should be re-
turned before spring vacation.

MIRACLES
OF
\FLAVOR.
Del icious meals
cleverly prepared
for taste-tempting-
ness and better
health.
WINES
Bottled and Draught
BEER
SPECIAL
LENTEN MEALS
SERVED
The Flautz Cafe
122 W. Wash. Ph. 7070
-on the corner-

"adito Torum
Is To Feature
Taylor, Grace
Mary Martha Taylor, '41, and Jan-
et Grace, '42, will appear on the
John MarshallLaw School Forum
sponsored by the U~niversity of Chi-
cago at 11:15 a.m. today over radio
station WJJD in Chicago.
Together with six other delegates
they are attending the annual Delta
Sigma Rho Congress. William Muehl,
'41, Arthur Biggins, '41, John Hus-
ton, '41, and R. Erwin Bowers, '41,
are the representatives of the men's
debate squad attending the national
meeting of the honorary forensic so-
ciety. Other representatives of the
women's varsity debate squad are
Jean Maxted, '41, and June de Cord-
ova, '41.
The group has participated in
Committees which have formulated
bills on national defense and hous-
ing. These bills were presented yes-
terday to the Congress which is or-
ganized to represent a legislative ses-
sion. The bills are then debated by
175 delegates from more than 40 col-
leges.
The University delegation will re-
turn to Ann Arbor tomorrow from
the three-day meet. They were ac-
companied by Prof. Kenneth G.
Hance of the speech department.

(I

NOW

0 i "

Before Damage
Is Done by
Heat and Moth

~N~N \

'N., N \ 'N.k

/7
LOVELY HANDBAGS
WILKINSON'S have a beautiful new stock of hand-
bags in all the new shades and styles-priced to fit
any budget, there are bags from $1 to $55. There 7
are some styled in Saddle leather-antique, black
and sequoia, and others of Alligator in brown, plain
or grained calf and all other colors.
$1 to 55

Send your furs

to ZWERDLING'S

for complete protection, expert
cleansing, repairing, and remodel-
ing. It costs no more for this 1007
protection.
Your furs will be called for and
delivered in the fall at your pleasure.
Just Phone 8507
V

I

I

THE IMPORTANT
FASHION ANGLE.
This Year... Is Furs -Take
advantage of our 37th Spring
Showing. Incomparable style,
quality, and value. Furs to
suit your taste and purse.

I

I

ii

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan