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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 07, 1941 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1GE S'1X

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

£~E SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.. r

Debate Teams
Will Consider
GradeSystem
Women's Squads To Meet
In Intramural Series:
SponsoredBy League
The women's intramural debating
teams have been divided into groups
of four teams each to participate in
the series of round-robin debates
scheduled for the spring season.
They will debate the proposition,
"Resolved: That the University
Should Adopt the Pass-or-Fail Sys-
tem of Grading."
In the tournament each team will
meet the others. The teams winning
the most decisions will enter the
elimination series.
Eight teams have been registered
and placed in the tournament. There
is still opportunity for teams to en-
ter the series, Jean Maxted, '41, in
charge of the women's division, an-
nounced.
Sponsored by Athena and the
League the debate tournament will
award trophies to the winners and
runners-up at the Speech Honors
Banqget to be held in April.
In Group A Rachel Gillette, '44,
and Charlotte Papernick, '44, of Jor-
dan will meet Martha Cook team
composed of Margaret Jackson, '42,
and Grace Volkman, '42.
Betsy Trethway, '42 and Kay Glad-
ding, '42 of Kappa Delta will defend
the negative against Myra Cook, '44,
and Betty Newmann, '43, of Jordan.
In Group B Norma Crowe, '44, and
Shirley Raskey, '44, of Jordan will
meet Cora Hackett, '42, and Harriet
Shoecraft, '41, of Zeta Tau Alpha.
Jean Clare, '43, and Mildred Ward,
'41, of Kappa Delta, will meet Esther
Tang, '41, and Opal Shimmons, '41,
of Martha Cook.

Special Course Is Made

Uncle Sam's.amy

Possible Through Grant

A grant from the Rockefeller Foun-
dation to the University will establish
a special eight-weeks course in Eng-
lish during the Summer Session for
Latin-American students who will en-
roll in American universities next fall,
Dr. Louis A. Hopkins as chairman of
the project announced recently.
The course will be offered to a j
limited number of students who will'
enroll in this and other Universities.
The course was set up as a national
plan to assist students in making;
the difficult language adjustment,
Dr. Hopkins pointed out.
The course will also constitute a
research project to determine the best
materials and techniques for teach-
ing English to foreign students. This}
feature of the plan will also prove of
scientific value in future work in this
field, Dr. Hopkins cited.
"English" House Proposed
As a part of the project an "Eng-
lish" house is proposed next summer
Groups Seeky
Scholarships
(Continued from Page 1)
in acquainting alumni groups with
the urgency of the project. Mem-
bers of the scholarship committee
are Edward Tann, '43E, chairman;
William Clark, '41, William Hurley,
'42, Lee Perry, 42 and John McCune,
'41.
Two new amendments were passed
changing the terms of office of Sena-
tors. It was decided that elections
should be held semi-annually in
1 April and December. At least one-

or a selected group of Latin-Ameri-
can students who would live with a
director and assistants in order to
develop further their command of
English and to adjust themselves to
college life.
The entire project has had the
support of the Division of Cultural,
Relations of the State Department.)
In a real sense it has been the
outgrowth of the Pan-American stu-
dent exchanges which the University
has developed during the past few
years. These excha'nges have pro-
vided scholarships and fellowships
for students from Latin American
countries.
For the past three years the Uni-
versity along with many others has
received an increasing number of for-
eign students from South and Cen-
tral American nations. Thus the ser-
vice to be given by the University
will benefit a large group of Spanish
and Portugese speaking students.
60 Enrolled In Classes
The plan has grown outof lang-
uage services offered by the Inter -
national Center under thedirection
of Prof. Raleigh Nelson, who has been
engaged in teaching English to for-'
eign students for more than 20 years.
This year more than 60 students are
enrolled in English classes at the
SCenter.
Members of the committee in
charge of the project are Dr. Hop-
kins, director of the Summer Ses-
sion as chairman, Prof. C. C. Fries
of the English department, who has
been director of the Linguistic Insti-
tute for the past five summers; Prof.
Hayward Keniston, chairman of the
Department of Romance Languages,
and Professor Nelson, director of the

Lieut. Bergren
Will Give Talli
Recruiting Division Officer
To Interview Applicants
Lieut. Orville V. Bergren of the
United States Marine Corps Re-
cruiting Division will present a lec-
ture on the purposes and organiza-
tions of the marine corps for all
students desiring commissions in the'
reserve at 4 p.m. today in the Natural
Science Auditorium.
Procurement officer for the Re-
cruiting Division in Detroit, Lieuten-
ant Bergren will offer individual in-
formation concerning entrance in
the Marine Corps Reserve from 9
a.m. to noon tomorrow and Mon-
day at the offices of the local NROTC
unit in North Hall.
All candidates for commissions
will be required to take three months
of basic training at the Marine Bar-
racks at Quantico, Va. Successful
candidates will be appointed second
lieutenants in the Reserve and will
be given three additional months of
training at Marine Corps Schools.
Following this second instruction per-
iod, officers will be called to active
duty for the duration of the na-
tional emergency.,

Prof. Hackett
To lBe Concert
'Soloist Monday
The University Symphony Orches-
tra, under the baton of Prof. Thor
Johnson of the School of Music, will
present its next concert at 8:30 p.m.
Monday in Hill Auditcrlum with
Prof. Arthur Hackett, tenor, as guest
soloist.
Selections which will be heard on
the program include the Overture
to the Interlude "The Secret of Su-
zanne" by Wolf-Ferrari, which will
open the performance, Schubert's
"Symphony No. 4 in C minor" and
Moussorgsky's "Pictures at an Ex-
hibition."
Professor Hackett, chairman of
the voice department of the School
of Music, will sing three selections by
Duparc, "Invitation au voyage,"
"Phydile" and "Le manoir- de Rose-
monde."
Well known for his many concert
appearances both here and, abroad,
Professor Hackett ,has been soloist
with many leading American orches-
tras including the New York Phil-
harmonic, Philadelphia, Cleveland,
Detroit, Los Angeles, San Francisco,
St. ,Louis and Boston Symphonies.
He made 23 appearances with the
Boston Orchestra.

Sidney Kingsley (left)., Broadway playwright, and Ed Oliver
(right), meet each other for the first time after receiving their new
uniferms. Oliver, who is from Wilmington, Del., went up to Fort Dix,
N. J., from Florida to report for duty.
Poll:Reveals Daily Rates Third
As Campus NVTewspaper Choice
f' F_

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

By ROBERT SPECKkARD
The Michigan Daily is third in
campus preference among newspap-!
ers behind the New York Times andi
Detroit Free Press, a Bureau of Stu-
dent Opinion Poll reveals.
Students prefer The Daily ahead of
the Detroit News, Detroit Times, Ann
Arbor News, and the Chicago papers,

magazines students read fiction and
non-fiction about equally the poll
shows. However, 22 per cent of the
sample questioned said they had nev-
er read fiction while at Michigan and
21 per cent said tie same about non-j
fiction exclusive of magazines and
newspapers.

TYPING -18

9

Hisl
Gi
(f

torical Files
yen Papers
f Comstock
Michigan Historical Collections
added to their files the
f former Governor William A.j

The M
recently
papers o

half of the offices are to be filled at u ----------------,h
International Center. however, the poll indicates. ter Concerts are first and general lec-
each election. Terms of office are to papers mentioned repeatedly by stu- tures second among the
be for one year. dents were the New York Herald Tri-extra-curric-
Thes other amendment provides Call National Guards n bune, Cleveland Plain Dealer, Boston ular activities of the campus, the
that any member who may have to Globe, Christin Science Monitor. ipoll shows. Lectures and discussions
drop out of the organization,. may be E LANSING, March 6--G'-The last on religion and art exhibitions are
permitted to select his successor if of Michigan's National Guard units Thirty-five per cent e per attended least, the results indicate.
he has served one semester. If he were ordered today by the War D- cet 581 stt ecton The poll reveals that 79 per cent of
has not served that long, the Senate partment into active service April questitoned rn the poll voted for the the Protestant student body has never
must ratify his choice. 7 for a year's training. New York Tl , 22 per cent for attended a guild meeting, 22 per cent
______________________Free Press, and 18 per cent said they oftede -uidmein,2 prcn
,idof the Jewish student body has never'
),ref erred The Dally, attended Hillel, and 41 per cent of
Students Prefer"Tme the Catholic student body has never
Michigan Men Are Preferred I (thi~ijas''d
c Among magazinesstudent prefer- attended Newman Club.
B Leneiss-centeNeedchieflr in the eum- Although the Student Religious
Life in that order, the poll indicates. Association is now three and one half
STwenty-five per cent voted for Time, Iyears old, the poll indicates that 28
By ROBERT MANTHO for us!" reverberated from every 16 per cent for the Digest and 14 per Ie of e campus isitil un
Michigan men are preferred at East nook and corner of the campus as the awcentaforLiie.awre of the kind of activities cen-
Lansing. infuriated males showed their dis- cn frLt.tered in Lane Hall, the headquarters
.r mPreferences among men and wo- of the Association.
"The sparkling humor and ready pleasure at the insinuating slurs cast men differ considerably the poll re-
wit" of -the Michigan male species against them by the disdainful fe- veals. Men place Time first, women
rate them the nod over the local East males.
Lansing escorts in the eyes of th However the threatened trip was ,refer The Readers Digest as first i
postponed due to the approach of ahong wm Nut ok is th
Michigan State coed, according to finals and the increasing amount of among women, but only places sixth R A D IO
statements made by Virginia Suchin work thrown upon the "wood-chop.. among the men; five per cent of the
and Mary Jane Cleaver, two of the pers" and "teeth-pullers" by uncom- women prefer Harpers Bazaar which By FRANCES MENDELSON
lovelier apparitions that infest the promising professors. There cane a registers zero among the men; on the
East Lansing campus. nflull in hostilities which lasted until other hand one per cent of the women -
Eas Lnsng amuI select Esquire, which places fourth Professor Abbot, between writing
This statement comes in the midst recently.
._._.. .,.. . -, ..Send Scouting Party on the lists of campus men. his new book and imbibing the Florida

TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,4
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 orI
2-14le 14c
JIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
TYPING and duplicating service.
Dorothy Testa, M.A., 625 East Lib-
erty (at State), Rm. 1. 2-1835. Re-
ports, theses, dissertations, briefs.
22c
FOR SALE
LOOKING FOR SECURITY?
2 ACRES.NAttractive 7-room house,
2-car garage, fruit, flowers, on
main highway, short distance east
of Ann Arbor. Near school in fine
neighborhood. $7,500, terms.
120 ACRES. 7-room house, furnace,
bath, electricity, phone. Good barn,
new silo. Woods, young orchard,
15 miles out. Will sell or trade for
Ann Arbor property.
219 ACRES--$5,900 with $1,450 down.
7-room house. I
180 ACRES with lake frontage.
House, barn, woods, $8,000, terms.
ORIL FERGUSON, 928 Forest,
Phone 2-2839. 26c

MISCELLANEOUS-20
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 5c
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Brown leather tobhcco pouch,
and comoy pipe at Michigan The-
atre-Reward--call Copley,, 2-3297.
298
HELP WANTED
130 GRAD, STUDENTS working 'on
master's thesis or doctor's disserta-
tion. Thesis consultant service in
exchange for student problems of
thesis writing. Phone 2-1835 for
details. 300

Comstock. These include such items:
as correspondence and account booksI
from his years of business and pub-
lic service.
Comstock before his term as gov-
ernor was a student of the University
of Michigan, from which he was'
graduated in 1899. While here he was
a member of Zeta Psi fraternity, to
which his son,. William, '42, now be-
longs. He . also served during 1909-
10 as presidcnt of Zeta Psi of North'
America.
Following graduation he was en-

4 v1U111 r~auaPLJ1 11GW~ c1-of a typical male-female feud on the
gaged in- banking, construction, oil Michigan campus begun when a poll
promotion, real estate and manufac- taken last semester revealed that
turing. Son of an early lumber op- the dentists and foresters were con-
erator in Alpena, he held public of- sidered by the Ann Arbor coed to be
fices in that city. the "least liked dates on campus."
Governor W. N. Ferris appointed On the other hand, the "lit" stu-
him Regent of the University for a dents and engineers rated one-two
term extending through 1913 and on the coed hit parade, although the
1914, and during 1933-34 he was gov- engineers finished a bad second.
ernor of the state of Michigan, a Foresters Sever Relations
fact notable because of Comstock's Immediately after the results of
democratic affiliations. the poll were announced, the den-
The papers will be closed to the tists and foresters went on record
public for some years, after which as saying they had severed diplo-
time they are expected to be inval- matic relations with ' the Michigan
uable in the compilation of histories coed and they vowed an en masse
of the state. pilgrimage to Ypsilanti. "It's Ypsi

l
i
f
y
.
l
i
i
i;

Then it happened! Striking with
the rapidity of a Nazi mechanized
unit on a quick foray, the Alpha Chi'
Sigma crew of masculine experiment-
ers. a professional chemical frater-
nity, sent several of its members on '
a scouting party to East Lansing by
way of conducting a novel experi-
ment.
The scouting party came back ap-
parently more than satisfied by their
treatment at the hands of "those
Michigan State angels." Glowing re-
ports of the "East Lansing side of
heaven" soon circulated around cam-I
pus wherever males gathered, until
various "exploring parties" soon
found their way northward over the
weekends.
42 Magazines Mentioned
The aggregate results point to a
new era on the Michigan campus.
No longer, the males assert, will wom-
an rule be effective as far as they
are concerned. In the future, when-
ever the Michigan coed gets out of
hand, male eyes will turn northward
-to East Lansing and vicinity.
Said Nicholas Jenesel, '41, whose
name is now intimately being con-
nected with .that of Virginia Suchin
of the Michigan State campus: "Take
it from me. If you're feeling out of
sorts with the world, travel on to
East Lansing, where an angel waits
for you."
The only comment made by Philip
C. DeLong upon his recent return
from the friendly haven to the north
was: "Go north, brother! Go north!"
A PORTABLEI
RE TYPEWRITER

Although the Gargoyle has had
three sell-outs this year it is tied with
Technic, The Literary Digest and
Good Housekeeping for 31st on the
list of campus magazine preferences.
New Era On Campus
A total of 42 differeni magazines
were mentioned as preferences by the
students questioned in the poll, sta-
tistics show.
Outside of newspapers and current
Arch School Presents
Exhibition Of Designs
The exhibition of drawings in De-
sign from the Pratt Institute of Fine
and Applied Arts, Brooklyn, New
York, now being shown in the ex-
hibition room, third floor of the
Architecture Building, will continue
through March 10.
A group of designs by last semes-
ter's classes in Design is also being
shown. The two exhibitions are
open to the public daily from nine
to 5 p.m.

sun, took time off last week to ap-
pear as a contestant on the "Prof.
Quiz" show. He won second prize
for an unheard of definition of deci-
bels. It seems he can take it, as well
as dish it out . .
Ted Grace returned to Ann Arbor
recently for a few days. He had his
tonsils out, and now he's.back on
WJR, new voice and all . . . Dick
Slade, one of the most recent radio
alumni, is announcer on W45D, new
frequency modulation station for the
Detroit News.
Mort Jampel, also newly graduated,
is away up in Sault Ste. Marie, on
Station WSOO. He is an announcer-
continuity writer. Maggy Soenksen,
along with WJLB (the former
WMBC) has moved into new studios
in the Eaton Towers, Detroit. She's
head of continuity for the station.
Steve Fillipiak, WIBM, Jackson,
drops into the studio occasionally.
He's living here in town . . . Mike
Wallace is announcing two coast-to-
coast shows over WXYZ. The "Green
Hornet" is one of them.

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY-2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.

STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special
dent rates. Moe Laundry,
South First St. Phone 3916.

stu-
226
10c

4
/,
/ ./i
'f j/
j:

TAILORING & PRESSING-12
DRESSMAKING and alterations.
Coats relined. Also sewing of all
kinds. Call Mrs. Ream, 8653. 23c
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Well located suite, $2.75
for one, $2.25 each for two-904
So. State. Phone. 4685. 299

__ ------_-____._ _._ ._____ ,d

Film WdEDICO
Money Filtered Smoking in
Can Buy FRANK MEDICO Pipes,
Cigarette or Cigar
GENILNE Holders is bringing
FI.TERS
MEDICO extra joy to armies of
PACKED smokers. It's the wisest
ONLY IN doar-pn
THIS RED e _____
BO.X
BAFFE SCREEN INTEROR
"CELLOPHANE" EXTERIOR

darned,
3c

117

V

j P

il1

%:

bluses
:10;
blouses %
rites . are
for Spring in
elsl Skirts in
lids, All Sizes.
ram $2.95
ters from $1.95

1111

A camera fan is our Bill,
Who snaps perfect pictures at will;
Found a swell camera "buy"
In a Classified reply
There's no need a Classified won't fill!

--0
1.1+

III

yiapY40. Year

I

Everything for the Record Collector

III

BUY IT IF YOU LIKE ITI
~ Rental Payments wilt be
deducted from purchase price.
ALL MAKES SOLD, RENTED, REPAIRED

* RCA Victor, Stromberg-Carlson and Ansley Radio Phono-
graph combinations. . Columbia and Decca table-model
and portable phonographs. * Victor, Columbia, Bluebird,
Decca, Okeh Records. * Record Cabinets. * Albums.
* Needles 0*Needle Sharpeners. * Books on music and
records. Pocket scores, 9 Record racks and carrying cases.
SOUND-PROOFED AIR CONDITIONED BOOTHS
MUSICALLY-TRAINED PERSONNEL

I11

All
r

Skirts,
yea

sweaters 'n'
ar-around favo
blossoming out
yummy past
plaids, so
Skirts fr
Blouses, Swea

0., D. Morrill I''

I

sill

IlII I

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