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September 30, 1939 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-09-30

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HIGAN p

Assists'
Students,

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' Help
Studies{

Balinese Cremation Is Thrilling
To World-Traveling Daily Man
By WILLIAM NEWTON1
Seven months spent traveling
around the world brought me no more
interesting sight than a Balinese cre-I
e mation. The surprising hilarity of
everyone connected with the cere-
mony was explained by the fact that
the Balinese religion-a mixture of
Buddhism, Hinduism and Moham-
medanism-affirms that one's soul
cannot go to heaven until his body
has been 'destroyed by fire. I
The particular cremation which I
witnessed was that of the chief of a
minor village, and the poor fellow's
soul had been wandering about in S

Ldents have been
ampus to continue
ie Ann Arbor Jew-
ecording to Betty
president of the
have been award-
1us committee and
be in the United
s Schaffer, one of
now in England.
lents who have al-
Michigan are Hans
as, Dr. Erich Hus-
tl. The others are
M/arion Meyer and
g used to provide
r the exiled stu-
through a special
ast fall, and range
board to provision
es of the student.j
the campus is re-
Ann Arbor Jewish
ig students, mem-j
and townspeople.

.Alumni Urge
Subscriptions
N otice Of Magazine Sent
To Each Livig Graduate
More than 80,000 notices have been
sent out by the Alumni Association,
soliciting subscriptions to "The
Michigan Alumnus," official alumni
magazine, T Hawley Tapping, gen-
eral secretary of the Association, an-
nounced yesterday.
This is the largest solicitation mail-
ing list ever covered in the history of
the alumni organization, Tapping
said. The list includes every living
alumnus in the United States, except
those in Ann Arbor.
The Michigan Alumnus" this year
features a new cover motif and a pie-
ture page of campus activities. The
feature, "Who's Who in the Alumni
University," which has outlined the
careers of more than 1,000 alumni in
over 15 years, has been relegated to
the back of the magazine:

space haunting people for more than
three years. The people of his village
had taken that long to accumulate
the amount of money to cover the
high cost of conducting what they
termed a "number-one gooda kind"
cremation. Cremation costs are high
in Bali, I was told, since great papier-
mache figures must be bought and at
least 150 mourners hired.
Detour Fools Spirits
The ceremony lasted at least three
hours, as theiprocession went many
miles out of its way en route- to the
burning grounds. This, I was told,
was to fool the evil spirits who al-
ways do their best to keep any soul
from getting to heaven. The rema ins
of the deceased were finally placed

if

FOU
lasses

ied Directory
D --1 LAUNDERING-9
in black AUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
2565 -kCareful work at low prices. -
2565.
SAMS IOME LAUNDRY-Students
orority pin laundry a specialty. We call and
Phone 5444 deliver. 4568 Jackson Rd. Dial
e. 6964. 9B
E 3 HOME HAND LAUNDRY--Moved

I traveled "on the road to Mandalay." . C I) It iaI i ervices
WILLIAM NEWTON We had only a few days in Burma, Reform services will be held at 11
waiting for a ship to Calcutta, but weat
inside the wooden image of a bull made the most of our time and made a.m., Sunday at the Hillel Founda-
symbol of minor nobility. a hurry-up trip to Mandalay. We tion at which Dr. Isar c Rabinowitz,
This interior had previously been were fortunate to be with a "Tom- director of the Foundation, will de-
wiped out by the women of the late mie" who knew the country, Lance- liver an address on American Neuw-
chief's family, their long black, ver- corporal Devereaux, of the Royal trality. This is the first of a series
min-laden hair being let down and' Scots. Devereaux had served a year of reform services which will be held
used for this. Shouts of great re- in Palestine and in Burma during the every Sunday during the year at 11
joicing then went up as the pyre was latest rebellion, so he knew the coun- a.m. at the Foundation.
kindled, and mingled with them were try and had many native friends. One
the shrieks of many domestic, ani- of these was able to secure for us aDvrau'qicthnngwshei
mals tied to stakes in the midst of private compartment o the train only thing that kept# us from inva-
the piled kindling. These animals, from Rangoon to Mandalay; true, it sion. Awaking from a sound sleep,
according to Balinese legend, would was only in a third-class carriage the soldier waved his chevroned
guide the soul on its long journey to equipped with wooden benches, but arms about in front of the native,t -
heaven. it kept us somewhat separated from shouted at him in Hindustani and
Road To Mandalay the amore fragrant of our native finally grabbed him by the beard
Despite cremations and the famed traveling-companions. and pulled him out of the compart-
women of the island, I was glad to T is compartment was rather dif- ment. The Sikh--at least 250 pounds
leave Bal and get aboard a Dutch ficult to keep private, as we had to1 of him-gave a shriek and jumped
freighter bound for Malaya. In Singa- hold its. door shut at every station, out of the train and ran down the
pore, a city even more nasally offen- and this meant staying awake platform toward the station, leaving
sive than any place in Java or Bali, through most of the night. A big all his bags in our car. ,
I met a boy from Virginia with whom Sikh once forced the door open, and (To be continued).

:ous

Almost new
sale. $25.00.

FOR RENT-5T
LIGHT front single room
veek; also suite to be shared
iw student $3.50 week. 808
d St. 2-2668.
rGTON-Two newly decor-
ooms with adjoining lava-
shower, steam heat. 422 E.
ngtonr SK
UNGTON-Newly decorated
rith adjoining lavatory. Ac-
date 3; also newly decorated.
room with adjoining lava-
Steam heat, shower bath.
sity aproval for men. 422

from 52 Eh. Liberty to 503 E. Lib-
erty. A trial will prove.
STUDENTS. -.Have clean, fresh
clothes. Student Bundle-mini-
mum 5 lbs.-Shirts 12c-no extra
charge for socks and-handkerchiefs.
Regular prices: -Shirts 14c, Socks
4c, Shorts 6c, Towels 4c, Under-
shirts 5c,' Handkerchiefs 2c. All
mending on finished work free of
charge. Ace Laundry, 1114 S. Uni-
versity. 721
SILVER LAUNDRY
007 Hoover ' Phone 5594
Free pickups ands deliveries
Price List
All articles washed and ironed.
Shirts. .. . .......14
Undershirts.................04
Shorts4...........04
Pajama Suits...............10
Socks, pair...... . ........03
Handkerchiefs ...............02
Bath Towels................03
All Work Guaranteed
Also special prices on Coed's laun-
dries. All bundles done separately.
No markings. Sills, wools our
specialty. 9
DANCING INSTRUCTION -14
DANCE-Tap or Ballroom, Piano,
classical or swing, note or ear. Uni-
versity Grad. Guaranteed quick
learning. Dial 8578. Ruth Patton.
TYPING - 18

VOTED the
Nilrmber One
CoI1 trniist /

rooms. Con-
ly furnished,
r graduates or
ear bus. Phone
TS or married
louble room in
wly decorated.
adjoining. Uni-
3 each. Phone
iroom in quiet
Stadium .Blvd.
ed room for
-across from
909 E. Huron,
tudent (male)
tchen, shower,
Le 2-1885. 602
enaw. Choice
ooms for men
)me. Shower,
Phone 7242.

VIOLA STEIN-Experienced
and notary public, excellent
706 Oakland, phone 6327.'

t.

ypist
work.
3

MISCELLANEOUS--20

RENT A RADIO-$1 a 'month. Few
fine sets left. Stofflet's, 327 S.
Main, 523 Liberty.
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND) GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins , Gravel Company. Phone
7112.

N~y00

.

I

. , i
-

f

l/

1

s

HE Business Statisti val Bureau recently asked 150,000 newspaper
readers to name their favorit columnist. They were carefully selected to
constitute a representative cross-section of intelligent public taste. Their
first choice was Heywood Broun, for his column IT SEEMS TO ME.
So readers' ballots confirm our 'editorial judgment that Broun is one of
the most interesting, stimulating; vivid minds writing in America today.
Whether it's about the League of Nations or Joe Louis, about painting or
poker-playing IT SEEMS TO ME has invariably something new to say,
and says it in a new way.
Yn11 'IAnd lI-vwnnl Rrn a mr u'~

We "Steak" our Reputation
We have the reputation for serving the most tender,
juicy, delicious steaks in Ann Arbor only because we
insist on buying the best meat money can buy - U.S.
Prime Beef. And it is only at the ALLENEL that you

,

tHI

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