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September 30, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


=l ~ase tmu
pens 16th Year
tOf Comptitio
dams Reveals Addition
To School Organi ation
Continuing a practice that has'
oved very beneficial to law stu-
nts in the past, the Law School
ise Club is entering its 16th year
. existence with registration be-
ning next Tuesday in Hutchins
al, John Pickering, '40L, said yes-
rday..
Members of the Case Club com-
Lttee this year, as in years past, will
the four competitors of the Club's
nal contest. In view of the mi-
ecedented enrollment in the Law
hool this year, however, a fifth-
embe has been added.
JWdg Freshmani Cases
The committee is composed of
hn Adams;, chairman, Robert Solo-
on, John Rubsam, Roy Steinheim-
and Pickering, all seniors in ithe
w School. Each member of the
mmittee presides as judge over one
the five freshmen Case Clubs and
ke first four named also preside
ei the four junior Clubs.
Pat experience shows that ap-
oximatley 90 per cent of the total
rollment of the freshmen and
nior classes enter Case Club compe-.
ion, Pickering pointed out. The
mmittee expects an enrollment in
e neighborhood of 400. These men
11 be divided into groups of four
r the purpose of arguirg the lgal
saes r1aised by a given set of hypo-
etical facts,.
.*fngwition Is Valuable
loculty men' feel that the exper-
ice gained in Club competition is
ra valuable, Pickering said, and
erefore have granted credit to all
io successfully finish the competi-
in, Students doing may take the
ort term of Practice Court, a regu-
r course, rather than the long term.
Until Christmaa vacation the Case
ubs ,will engage .in first .round
mpetition, Pickering explained.
'ntative plars call, for 10 freshmen
ses and four junior, cases to be
iued each week. Selection of wi-
rs in first'rounds will be announced
the start of the second semester
d final competition will then be-
.1x
ear Of Prof Keeps
Foot Of Class Full
college students show their inher-
t bshfulness by the seats they take
e first day in class; a faculty men-
r saidyesterday.
Ajrtiost the entire class will' in-
riably seat itself in the back. ot the
oma on the first day, his statistics
:w. On the second day a few brave
U1s will venture to the center rows
d by the third day, as the pro-
sor becomes less frightening, the
0s will spread itself from the rear
to the first few rows. This is as
e of upperclass students, he main-
ned, as it is of freshmen and sopho-

Question Marks Of Eastern Europe
NORWAY FNLAND
CAN ES"TON/A
SWEDENSAVE SELF
WLL HITLER MAKE
NEW PEACE OFFER oscow
~ ~$ 4~ LITHUANIA,
WWILL GERMANY,
RUSSIA SIGN
E.PRUSSIATILITARY UPACr
BE R OND< ON ISE'
G ~ ~ ' ES N OIA NEDSOVIE T RUSSIA
WILL BUFFER'C
ITUERKE FORESRSTB SQUEEZ
AROLANL ON ITS BORDERS"
SOVIETENEMIEsT WILR5,TRE
HUNGARY
FOR.TBRACLBARESTC
YUGOSLAVIA Black Sea
A"TL Y kBULGARIA
* sonA
0Ro 'r
str o a t c e ee n s c f o r
dica p q 4 f t e mn
gWiL TURKEY FORBImaodehanes.
pARDANELL ES c ,E 5 i" cxRVS
SO VIE T ENEMIES WILL RUJSSIA, TURKEY
FOR4s4NEUTRAL BLOCr,
.eAN BALKANS C re
Suez E >
canal a
L I B Y' A (IT) E G Y P T a
Moscow became the center of European. diplomacy as. nations of
southeastern Europe watched developments closely fo~r any sign of
moves that might affect their fate. Meantime Paris saw indications
.that Hitler might come forth with gjome new peace offer. This mapM
indicates the tap questions. of the moment ina situation which might
againresult 1n map changes.
's-hurst ,'4L, Arizona Senator,
Can Recall1 Adventnrons Career

Graduate Club'
To Hold Picnic
At First Outing
Students To Meet Sunday;
Hike And Weiner Roast
To Feature Excursion
The Graduate Outing Club will be-
gin its fall program with a hike and
weiner roast at 3 p.m. tomorrow.
Members of the club will begin their
excursion at the northwest entrance
of the Horace Rackham Building.
Fr om this point the hikers will pass
through the Arboretum and along
the Huron river, ending the jaunt at
the "Island" for games, a wei er
roast and a campfire.
All graduate students and faculty
members are eligible to participate In
the functions of the club, which has
been on the campus since 1932. The
group has weekly outings on Sa~tr-
days and Sundays.
Plans for the. fall and winter are
not yet definite, but include hiking,
bicycling, volley ball, baseball, roller-
skating, weiner roasts, toboganning,
skiing, ice skating, and swimming at
the Intramural Building on Saturday
evenings. In the event of bad weath-
er, meetings are held in the cluib's
rooms at the Rackham building,
which include a kitchen and game
room.
Officials for the coming year will
be elected at the fourth meeting of
the club this fall.
Sigma Nu Leader
To Visit Ann Arbor
Dr. Edward H. Hashinger of Kan-
sas City, Kan., national president of
the Sigma Nu fraternity, will visit
the local chapter this weekend. This
is the first visit of Sigma Nu's na-
tional president to any chapter since
his recent election in August.
Dr. Hashinger is professor of medi-
cine and director of the clinic at the
University of Kansas Medical School.
Author of textbooks and scientific
articles; Dr. Hashinger is also one of
the foremost physicians of Kansas
City engaged in the private prac ice
of internal medicine and diagnosis.
A faculty tea and reception has
been planned; at the chapter house
for Sunday afternoon in honor of Dr.
Hashinger, and President and Mrs.
Ruthven and members of the ad-
ministration as well as a large num-
ber of faculty members have been in-
vited.
Correction
The first meals of the Men's Resi-
deuce Halls will be served at 6 pm.,
Wednesday, Oct. 4, instead of Mon-
day, Oct. 9, as stated in yesterday's
Daily.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN I
SATURDAY, SEPT. 30, 1939
VOL. L. No. 6-
Notices
Faculty, School of Education: The
first luncheon meeting of the facul-
ty will be held on Monday, Oct. 9
(rather than Oct. 2 as regularly
scheduled) at 12 o'clock noon at the
Michigan Union.,
Faculty, College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts:1
Attendance report cards are being
distributed through the Departmen-
tal Offices. Instructors are requested
to report absences to my office in ac-
cordance with the rules printed on
these cards.,
Please note especially the regula-
tions concerning three-week absen-
ces, and the time limits for dropping
courses. The rules relating to ab-
sences are printed on the attendance
cards. They may also be found on
page 36 of the current Announce-
ment of our College.
Erich A. Walter.
Sunday Library Service: On alll
Sundays from October to Jtine, ex-
cept during holiday periods, the Main
Reading Room and the Periodical
Room of the.General Library are kept
open from' 2 to 9 p.m.
Books from other parts of the
building which are needed for Sun-
day use will be made available in theI
Main Reading Room if request is
made on Saturday to an Assistant in
the reading room where the books
are usually shelved.
Rules Governing Participation in

Public Activities Effective September,
1939.
I ".
Participation in Public Activities.
Participation in a public activity is.
defined as service of any kind on a
committee or a publication, in a pub-
lic performance or a rehearsal, or in
holding office or being a candidate
for office in a class or, other student
organization. This list isniot' intend-
ed to be exhaustive, but merely is
indicative of the character and scope
of the activities included.
II.
Certificate of Eligibility. At the
beginning of each semester and sum-
mer session every student shall be
conclusively presumed to be ineligible
for any public activity until his eli-
gibility is affirmatively established by
obtaining from the Chairman of the
Committee' on Student Affairs, in the
Office of the Dean of Students, a
Certificate of Eligibility. Participa-
tion before the opening of the first
semester must be approved as at any
other time.
Before permitting any students to
participdate in a public activity (see
definition of Participation above), the
chairman or manager of such activity
shall (a) require each applicant to
>resent a certificate of eligibility; (b)
sign his initials on the back of such
certificate and (c) file with the
Chairman of the Committee on Sti-
dent Affairs the names of all those
who have presented certificates of
eligibility and a signed statement to
exclude all others from participation.
Blanks for' the chairmen's lists may
be obtained in the Office of the Dean
of Students.
Certificates of Eligibility for the
first semester shall be effective until
March 1. -
III.
Probation and' Warning. Students

activity. IN.
Eligibility, First Year. 1
man in his first semester of
may be granted a Certificat
gibility.
A freshman, during his sE
mester of residence, may be
Certificate of Eligibility pr
has completed 15 hours or
work with (1) at least one n
or B and with no mark of
C, or (2) at least 212 times
honor points as hours and
mark of E. (A-4 points,
D-1, E-0).
Any student in his first
of residence holding rank a
of freshman may be grante
tificate of Eligibility if he
mitted to the University
standing.

in

V.
Eligibility, General.
(Continued on

In order to
Page 4)

I

NOW!

D ARRYL F. ZANUC
Production of

w

.

OU ARE INVITED TO
HAVE LUNCHEON AT
MITCHI. 0EL L'S
CUT-RATE DRUG STORE
SATURDAY; LUNCHEON
No.1 Breaded Pork Chops, Spinach, Mashed
Potatoes, Choice of any 5c Drink.. . 30c

(Second of a series)
Five times the people of the state
of Arizona have sent to the U.S. Sen-
ate six-feet four-inches of cowboy,
astronemer and politician. And, if
present indications hold true, Michi-
gan alumnus Henry Fountain Ash-
urst, '04L, will make it an even half-
dozen in 1941.
A jack-of-all-trades, in his sixty
four'years of life' Senator_ Ashurst has
lived a life as varied as that of any
pulp-magazine hero. As all politi-
cians would like to be, he was born
in a prairie wagon in 1875 at Winne-
muca, Ariz.
Was' A Cowboy
Rather than follow in the footsteps
'of his'father, who was a miner, Sena-
tor Ashurst began work as a cowboy,
at the age of 15. This job led him
into astronomy, his favorite hobby,
as well as into the profession he
later chose to follow. When one of
young Ashurst's horses was stolen, he
was so deeply impressed by court-
room procedure that he decided to
become a lawyer.
He left the ranch where he was
employed and came to Flagstaff,
Ariz., where the leading gambler of
the town, an old acquaintance, gave
him a position as turnkey of the local
jail. Between -shooting affrays and
raids upon saloons, Ashurst learned
the law. He was elected to the
State Legislature at the age of 21,
in 1896.
And Ex-Turnkey
The ex-turnkey was admitted to
the bar before his entrance into law
school, while he was still a member
of the legislature. He became Speak-

er of the House in 1899, relinquishing
that position to enter the University
of Michigan. Upon his return to
Arizona, he was elected to the U.S.
Senate. Coincidentally and perhaps
appropriately, a few days after the
giant Westerner first entered the
Capitol the chandeliers were re-
moved from the ceiling of the Sen-
ate.
His greatest . moment, Senator
Ashurst records in his 200,000-word
diary, came during the fight over the
ratification of the Versailles Treaty.
His discovery that President Wilson's
name had been affixed to a letter by
a rubber stamp led to the appoint-
ment of a senatorial committee to de-
termine whether the ailing Wilson
was capable of administering , his
office.

t A 2 0t CaaturryFo Piture aterrfog
y~ POWER
~ BRENT
Bren4a Joyc' Nigel Bruce-"Maa Oppepskaya
Joseph Schildkraut."Mary Nash Jan Darwell
Marjorie Ramabeau " Henry Travers " H. B.Warner
Also
Walt Disney Cartoon
Donald Duck in
"SEA SCOUTS"

1y

'

No 2. Hamburger Pattjes, String Beans, Mashed
Potatoes, Choice of any 5c Drink . . . 25c
No. 3. Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwich, Coffee... 19c
SPECIAL - Chocolate Sundae. . . 10c

I I

I

in the Michigan Theatre Bldg.
PHONE 9288... Promhpt1

- One door west of Theatre lobby.
Delivery Service. .1 Oc Extra

1 w
? ?', 4 '

Iv
a

t. ,f

fi

PLEASE NOTE:
25c until 5 P.!'

Shows Continuous Today!
A. - 35c until closina.

CHURCH

Arbor Brefs

DIRECTORY

A picture of Dr. Warren P. Lom-
rd, a member of the medical school
culty from 1892 to 1923, has been
esented to the medical school li-
ary by Col. Ambrose Pack.'
Dr. Lombard died last July. The
cture was presented to the library
honor of his memory, by Col, Pack,
ho had been a close friend. Dr.
imbard was 84 years old at the .ime
his death.
The University Board of Regents
11 meet on Saturday morning, Oct.
under present plans.

i

THE

Members of the University faculty
who are attending various meetings in
the United States are the following'
Dr. Harley A. Haynes, director of
the' University Hospital, attending a
meeting of the American Hospital
Association at Toronto.
Prof. Wells I. Bennet, dean of the
School of Architecture and profes-
sors Emil Lorch, Jean Hebrard, Fred-
erick p. O'Dell, participating in a
meeting of the American Institute of
Architecture and Association of Col-
legiate schools of Architecture.
Prof. Charles L. Jamison, of the
business administration school, will
give a paper at a business manage-
ment conference in New York City.
Dr. Robert S. Ford, of the Bureau.
of Government, will attend two meet-
ings in San Francisco on Oct. 16-20.
Prof. Lewis G. Vander Velde, of
the history department, will deliver
a paper at' a meeting of American
Archivists at Annapolis Oct. 13 and

BEER, ALE, WINE
CHAMPAGNE
All Sizes Kegs with Pumps.

HILLEL FOUNDATION
East University at Oakland. Dial 3779
Dr. Isaac Rabinowitz, Director.
Saturday, 8:00' P.M. Party for new stu-
dents. All freshmen and. trahsfer stu-
dents welcome.
Sunday,. 11:00 A.M. Services. Sermon by
Dr. Rabinowitz: "American Neutrality.".
Tuesday, 7:30 P.M. Avukah meeting. All
welcome.
Friday, 7:30 P.M. Services for the Sabbath.
8:0g P.M. Fireside Discussion led by Pro-
fessor Preston Slosson. "Books or Men
Which Have Influenced My Thinking".
Social hour following services.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL CHURCH
Theodore Schmale, Pastor
432 South Fourth Avenue. Dial 8498
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon
topic: "Three Duties We Dare not Ne-
glect.'
6:00 P.M. Student Supper and Fellowship
Hour.
FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH
State and Washington Streets~
Charles W. Barashares, Minister
Choir director, Hardin Van Deursen.
Organist, Mary Porter.
9:45° A.M. Student class at Stalker Hall.
10:40 A.M. Worship service. Thbe sermon

ST. PAUL LUTH ERAN
(Mo. -Synod)
Liberty at Third Street
Carl A. Brauer, Pastor
9:30 A.M. Bible Class.
9:30 A.M. Service in German.
10:45 A.M. Morning worship, sermon top-
ic "Three Important Lessons".
3:30-7:30 P.M. Open house for all stu-
dents.'
6:00 P.M. Supper, served by the ladies.
7:30 P.M. Preparatory Services.
7:45 P.M. Holy Communion service and
sermon-"No Other Name Given".
U NITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets.
11:00 A. M. Morning Service. In the ab-
sence of Rev. H. P. Marley, Dr. Edward
W. Blakeman will conduct the service.
7:30 P.M. Liberal Students' Union Meeting
in the library of the church. Prof. C. N.
Wenger will speak on the topic: "The
European Scene".
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue. Dial L-4466
William P. Lemon, D.D. Minister.
Hardin Van Deursen, Choir Director.
William Barnard, Organist.
Palmer Christian, Director of Music on
leave.
9:30 A.M. Church School. Classes for all
age groups.
10:45 A.M. Nursery for those desiring to
leave their small children while they at-
tend the morning service.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship Service.
"Wanted--A Religion" will be the sub=
ject of Dr. Lemon's sermon. Palmer
( hi'thtian at the organ and directing the

. fA,

I

Dial 8200
For Delivery Service.

f

0.

303 North Fifth
Ann Arbor

III

11

e4

O. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. (opposite Kresge's)

I

Since 1908

Phone 6615

'rl li CA" D I qF E D.C. -AT-,-- -1 T% P, - I fr- I 1 . I I

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