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September 28, 1939 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURsDAY,seP

risler Still Worried About Varsity Defense

a ell & $ush
310 South State
"'Styles of Tomorrow Today"

IN THIS
CORNER
By Mel Fineberg

Cubans Give Lively Welcome
To All-American Baseball Nine

I A Matter Of Degree . .

*0

There once was a time when foot-
ball was three-quarters muscle and
one-quarter insanity. But in modern
times, you've got to have an educa-
tion to play and an education to
coach college football.
Wallie Weber, frosh coach, is
one of these educated guys. His
sentences are removed bodily
from Webster's Dictionary and his
favorite author is Roget. A de-
gree is a degree, he figures, and
should be put to work. So before
his frosh gridders go into their
first workout, Dr. Weber, A.B.,
Phi Beta Kappa, F.O.B., R.S.-
VP., insists that they fill out a
certain blank which is to be con-
fused with an application blank
for a job. While the eminent
doctor did not exactly explain
it this way to us, here's how he
probably meant it.
"By my insistence that these
adolescents fill out the application
blank with'which TI present them up-
on their initial appearance at this
field of athletic competition I am
able to ascertain more readily and
more rapidly certain underlying mo-
tives that actuate these potential rep-
resentatives of this institution of
learning upon the field of gridiron
activity. Of course, the replies they
make to my interrogations are not in
themselves what I require. But I use
the method of the psychoanalyist (the
Adlerian rather than the Freudian)
and their answers give me an insight
into their subconscious.
"By constant references to their
childhoods I am able to discover
hidden motivations and once I
discover them, by jove, in one
hour they are virtual certainties
for all-American aggregations."
Golly, ain't erudition a wonderful
t'ing?"
Okay, Mr. Doctor, we'll fill out one
of your application blanks and see if
you can "ascertain" that our mother
used to beat us
--~
Queries Queer
Name: Walter R. Ureddy.
Ann Arbor phone: 2-2521.
Ann Arbor Address: 1313 E. Anir
Home address: Corner Spruce and
Juice, Altoona, Pa.
High School or Prep School: Kiski.
Height: Yes.
Weight: No.
Age: 23.
Positions played in school: Clarinet.
Other sports: Jacks, hop scoteh,
craps, necking.
Years of competition in football:
under my right name, 3; under alias,
7.
Rate your abilities in the order of
your proficiency. Tackling, blocking,'
punting, passing, place-kicking, kick-
ing off, pass, defense, pass catching:
Enclosed please find newspaper clip-
pigs.
Are you out merely to make the
squad pictures? What is this, a gag?
What block live you perfected the
best? Tle shoulder block or the
body block? Wooden blocks and
arend-the-blgel.
If you play end, tackle, or guard,
which side of the line did you play on
offensively and defensively? What
means these words?
If you were a center or a back,
which side of the line defensively did
you back up? (right or left) I'm a,
liberal.
Were you a blocking back in high
school? I was left back four times.
Were you a left halfback? Down
with communism!!
What was the predominate offen-

By GENE GRIBBROEK
Playing ball before wild crowds
of Cuban fans who "threw beer
bottles and packed knives and guns"
and then being wined and dined by
the President of the Republic-those
were the highlights of Bill Step-
pon's summer vacation.
Steppon, who is expec.ed to take
over a steady job at second base next
spring, was planning a rather pro-
saic summer attending the Summer
Session when he was invited to try
out for the All-American Amateur
Baseball Team at Cooperstown, N.Y.
Bill accepted, and after the week-
long tryouts were over, he found
himself one of fourteen picked from
a squad' of 200 of the best college
stars in the country.
Team Split Even
Led by Les Mann, of the Inter-
national Amateur Baseball Associa-
tion, who handled the "political end"
of the trip, and Coach Les Bursey,
the. boys caught the Pan-American
Clipper at Miami for Havana and
Tropical Brewery Stadium to com-
pete for the $15,000. John Moore
Trophy, emblematic of the Amateur
Championship of the World, held the
previous year by England. There,
before daily crowds of 40,000 they
played six games in a month against
the entries from Cuba and- Nicara-
gua, winning three and losing three
to end up one game behind the vet-
eran host team. These three were
the only competitors this year, due to
the crisis in Europe.
Steppon was enthusiastic about
the Cuban players. "There were at
least three who could have been in
the Majors," he said, "but they were
in the army and couldn't get out."
It seems that, in Cuba, good ball
players are subsidized by the gov-
ernment instead of by universities.
The Michigan boy hit safely seven

times in 22 times at bat, including
a triple and two doubles, for a .318
average and made out one misplay
in the field. Bill occupied his natur-
al spot, second base, in three of the
games and finished up on third to
take advantage of his strong arm.
The players, as guests of the gov-
ernment, were treated royally. Dur-
ing their month's stay they were
entertained by, everybody from the
two leading Havana breweries to
President Batiste himself, who gave
them a banquet. The series was
opened with a parade and flag-rais-
ing, Olympic style, and Sports Com-
missioner Marine, President Batiste's
second in command, attended all the
games.
WRESTLING
All members of the wrestling
team and all prospective members,
both frosh and varsity, should re-
port to Yost Field House at 4 p.m.
today.
-Coach Cliff Keen
FOLLOW
THE CROWD TO
WEBER & KUOHNS
YOUNG MEN'S SHOP
Freeman Shoes . $5, $6, $7
Peters Shoes . $3.15, $4.00
Coopers Hose .4 pair $1.00
Coopers Shorts. 3 for $1 .00
Wool Slacks $2.95 to $5.95
500 pair to select from.
Coopers Sweaters
All Styles
$1.25 to $5.00

f tt
So goodlokin
ra-*and so pracical
A/
UNIVERSITY COACHER
RAINCOAT
BY
A LIG ATOR
$750
At Better Dealers
Not style alone : . but guaranteed protection against rain,
too! Yes ... this most handsome of raincoats with fly front,
full sweeping lines, casual collar, smart brass buttons .
actually keeps yod' dry even:in the severest downpour! The
University Coacher by Alligator is one of those things
where there's no: need to sacrifice style for downright
practicability ... in fact, no coat equals it
for either style or protection. Better get
ene today . . . IT'S SURE TO RAIN!
The "Coacher" by Alligator ado available in
Samhuar "Special Finish'"... ..$147
Galecloth . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1.50
Other A1494ator Raincoats, $5.75 to $25 /

sive formation used in your high
school? B.O.
Have you ever called signals? No,
what's his number?
If you have punted, what average
distance are you capable of doing
from the line of scrimmage? 37.91%
meters.
If you passed in high school, what
was the best record you attained in
completing passes in any one game?
Once I passed Geometry.
Have you read the football rules
recently? What, are there rules?
Are you now working for your
board? Nah. .Where: What's dis
work stuff?
Are you now working for your
room? Who me? Where? Over the
rainbow.
Are you entirely self-supporting
here? Sometimes I wear suspenders.
Name in the order of dificulty,
your hardest subjects in high school,
Language, English, Math., Science
and History: None of these would be
hard except I couldn't read.
How many hours a day do you
think you should budget for study?
I'll bite.
Were you ever severely injured in
a football game? Me pride once.
Have you ever had a bad knee, a
bad ankle, a bad hip, or a bad shoul-
der? No, but I got a girl who's got
'em all.
Would you object to playing an-
other position on the team other
than the one you stated you played,
if it meant helping the team? Not
as long as I do all the scoring.
Are you willing to train to make
this squad a strong one? If it'll help
'any, I won't even wash.
What kind of work, if any, have
you done the last three months?
None! I was a life-guard.
Do you like physical contact? Not
if 4 out of 5 aren't beautiful.
Have you ever boxed or wrestled?
See above.
Which activity do you think should
come first here. Social life, athletic
participation, study of college sub-
jects? I'm here to play football.

I '~

. -
:iL

FALL RAS ARRIVED at
Here are new Fall clothes and accessories
such as those you will see on America's
leading campuses. Here are clothes of
sophistication and Quality and plenty of
today's all-important "oomph!"

SUITS by Worsted-Tex $30. to $40.
SUITS by Clothcra ft ... $25. and $27.50
The Knit-Tex TOPCOAT.. . ... $30.00
The REVERSIBLE Coats....... $18.50
Mallory HATS ..... . . .... $4. to $5.
The WILSON by Mallory ........ $3.50

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