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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 21, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PACE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'WNDAY, JAN. 21, Bw

* I

OFFIC-AL BULLETIN
"All- Y j

(Continued from Page 4) 12 noon. Students'. Bible Class. H.
I L. Pickerill, leader.
Churches !6:30 p.m. Guild Sunday Evening
Disciples Guild (Church of Christ): Hour. A round table discussion on
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship. Rev. the topic "The Religion We Live By."
Fred Cowin, minister. John Howard, '41SM, leader. Social
hour and refreshments following the
discussion.
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church:
Sunday: 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion;
11:00 a.m. Morning Prayer and Ser-
mon by The Rev. Frederick W. Leech;
11:00 a.m. Junior Church; 11:00 a.m.
r Kindergarten in Harris Hall; 7:00
p.m. Student Meeting in Harris Hall.
Prof. Leroy Waterman will speak
r on "The Gospels (or, How,Much of
Jesus' Teaching Do We Get In Spite
of Paul?)."
First Congregational Church: 10:45
a.m. Public Worship. Dr. Leonard A.
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Mar A
TZE L Remodeling of
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cota speciaity.
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Parr will speak on "Perverted Patrid-
tism in Religion."
6:00 p.m. Student Fellowship Sup-
per, followed by a discussion on "The
Place of Devotional Practicesin "Re-
ligion" led by Mr. Kenneth Morgan.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
Day Saints: Sunday School and dis-
cussion group at' 9:30 a.m. in the
Chapel of the Women's League. MIA
Sunday evening at 7:30 in Lane Hall.
First Methodist Church: Morning
Worship Service at 10:40 a.m. Dr.
C. W. Brashares will preach on
"Christianity-Its Economic Expres-
sion."
Stalker Hall: Wesleyan Guild meet-
ing at 6 p.m. at the Methodist Church.
Miss Hisaka Fujiwara, a graduate
student from Japan, will speak on
"Christian Youth in Japan." Fel-
lowship hour and supper following the
meeting.
Baptist Church: 9:30, Graduate
Bible Class. Prof. Leroy Waterman,
teacher.
10:45. Morning Worship. Sermon
topic "Joseph, the Optimist."
12:00. Student Round Table. Dis-
cussion topic, "What Can We Believe
About the Lord's Supper?"
6:15. Roger Williams Guild in the
Guild House, 503 E. Huron. Miss
Agnes Crow will report on the Deni-
son Conference which she attended
during Christmas Vacation.
Unitarian Church: 11 a.m'Wanted
A President of the World."
7:30 p.m. Round Table discussion:
"An American Alternative for War,"
by Mr. Tom Downs, '40L . Last meet-
ing before exams. Refreshments.
Trinity Lutheran Church will hold
its worship services on Sunday at
10:30 a.m. Rev. H. O. Yoder's ser-
mon topic will be "Th Victor's Race."
Student Evangelical Chapel serv-
ices on Sunday will be conducted by
the Rev. George Hylkema of Grand
Rapids.eMorning worship at 10:30
and evening worship at 7:30. Both
services are held in the Michigan
League Building and are directed to
meet the needs of all students inter-
ested in Evangelical Christianity.
First Presbyterian Church: 10:45
a.m. "Life That Is Otherwise" will
be the subject of Dr. Lemon's ser-
mon at the Morning Worship Serv-
ice.
4:30 p.m. Vesper Communion
Service and reception of new mem-
bers.
5:30 p.m. Westminster Student
Guild will meet for supper and fel-
lowship hour. Speaker: Dr. Allan C.
Barnes. Subject: "The Responsibility
of Being Young."
Hillel Foundation: Reformed serv-
ces will be held Sunday morning at
11:06. The sermon "Prophets or
Poets" will be read by Dr. IsaacE
Rabinowitz. ,
The Ann Arbor Society of Friends,
will hold a meeting for worship;
(based on silence) from 5:00 to 6:00
p.m. Sunday at Lane Hall. A busi-;
ness meeting will be held from 6:00
to 7:00 p.m. All interested are cordi-
ally invited.
Zion Lutheran Church will hold its
worship services at 10:30 a.m. Sun-
day. Rev. E. C. Stellhorn's sermon
topic will be, "Jesus on The Revealed
Religion. "

Detroit Branch
Of UniversaIy
Organizes Club
Social Work Students
Hold Meeting; Elect
Title ToPresidency
(Special To The Daily)
DETROIT.-raduate students of
social work in the Institute of Public
and Social Administration (a part
of the Horace H. Rackham School
of Graduate Study) convened here
this week to form a student organi-
zation.
The 16 students present elected
Monroe Title, College of the City of
New York, '39, temporary chairman,
and Joseph P. Andriola, Michigan,
'38, temporary secretary.
Arrangements Made
Since many of the students have
had experiences in various fields of
social work, (including probation,
public assistance, corrections work,
psychiatric social work, medical social
work and others), arrangements were
made for more "get-togethers" for
the purpose of exchanging views about
their respective specialties.
Social work was described as "a
growing and dynamic profession;"
hence it was decided to hold dis-
cussions on development of new tech-
niques in the field, on the question
of jobs after schooling at the Insti-
tute, and on the question of faculty-
student relationships.
Form Closer Tie
Many of the students feel that they
should establish a closer tie with the
campus in Ann Arbor. Although the
Institute is located in Detroit the
students feel very much a part of the
University, and would like to partici-
pate more in University activities.
The 50th anniversary of its found-
ing will be celebrated by the Univer-
sity of Chicago in 1941.

Ouestions Mix
i L X pert Q 1z
'Mental Giants' Perform
Before 5,000; Ruthven,
Opens Battle Of Wits

Te nteriat-onal Center wilend
iUs entertainment program for the
semester at 7 p.m. today, when the
University's Little Symphony Orches-
tra, under the direction of Thor
Johnston, plays at the Center's regu-
lar Sunday festivities at the Union
Ballroom.
Abandoning the 'usual Sunday
Night Supper because of the heavy
attendance expected at the concert,
members of the Center were remind-
ed by Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, direc-
tor, that they may also invite friends
to attend.
Although the concert ends the
scheduled programs, the Center will
continue to be open during the re-

Symphony To Play.For Center

- V

nainder of t'hesemester.and Thurs-
day Teas will not be canceled.
The concert to be given by the Little
Symphony should not be confused
with the afternoon concert to be giv-
en today by the entire orchestra.
Educators Hear R uthven
Speaking on "An Experiment in
Education" President Alexander G.
Ruthven yesterday addressed 350
school leaders attending the Con-
ference on Instructional and Curricu-
lum Problems sponsored by the
School of Education. He described
the alumni policy he has endeavored
to effect during the past 10 years.

(Continued from Page 1)
the platform will remain in the room.
If the atmosphere becomes too op-
pressive, take an aspirin. We can't
open the windows, because Shirley
Smith (vice-president of the Univer-
sity) says we'll use too much coal."
That's the kind of evening it was,
slowed up only once by a Glee Club
rendition of four numbers, and group
tinging of five University songs.
The program, arranged for by Mr.
Adams whose six months attendance
here in 1899 gave thim "honorary"
alumnus standing, was presented as
part of the Ann Arbor Alumnae
Club's campaign to establish a wom-
en's cooperative residence here. The
residence will be built in memory of
the late Mary B. Henderson, founder
of the League, and a prominent lead-
er in alumnae organization.
Co-op Group
MeetsToday
Personnel of the new men's coop-
erative house that is being fo'rmed
next semester will meet at 3 p.m. to-
day at the Union in a final organiza-
tional session before the beginning
of the final examination period, Ed
Fried. '40, announced yesterday.
Reports of temporary committees
who have been working on the vari-
ous problems involved in the organi-
zation of the new house, which will.
be the ninth cooperative house at
Michigan, will be heard at the meet-
ing, Fried said.

Skatingan
Ski Clothes
REDUCED20%
OUR COMPLETE STOCKS of active winter sports clothes
and warm accessories substantially reduced.fright at the
height of the season! Your opportunity to save on the
outfits you've been wanting, with plenty of time still to
enjoy them THIS season!
SKI SUITS . . Formerly 12.50 to 22.50
Wools and wind-proof airplane cloth. Natural, navy, brown and
black.
SEPARATE SKI JACKETS . . Formerly 6.50 to 10.95
Warmly lined; some with hoods. Plains, plaids.
SEPARATE SKI PANTS . . Formerly 5.00 and 6.50
All wools and airplane cloth. Natural, brown and navy.
SKATING DRESSES . . . Formerly 10.95 to 19.50
One- and two-piece styles. Jerseys, velveteens, wools. Black
and colors.
SEPARATE SKATING SKIRTS . Formerly 6.50 to 10.50
Corduroys, velveteen, jersey.
SEPARATE SKATING JACKETS . Formerly 5.00 to 8.50
Quilted challis, corduroy; also, one hooded flannel shirt.
WARM SHAKER KNIT ACCESSORIES

Former Student Named Recipient
Of Noble Award InEngineering
C. E. Shannon Receives Prize For Technical Paper
On Analysis Of Relay And Switching Currents

t
t

__S -

I

A coveted honor was bestowed up-
on another Michigan graduate when
C. E. Shannon, '36E, was announced
as recipient of the Alfred Noble prize
for 1939.
The Alfred Noble prize is awarded
each year for the best technical paper
presented by an engineer. Shannon
received the award for his paper en-
titled "A Symbolic Analysis of Relay
and Switching Circuits." The award
will be presented during the winter
convention of the American Institute
of Electrical Engineers in New York,
Jan. 22.
Shannon received the degree of
bachelor of science in electrical en-
gineering here in 1936. He has since
been engaged in graduate work at
the Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology. He held the position of re-
search assistant in electrical en-
gineering from 1936-38. He was re-
search assistant on a special project
during the summer of 1938, and has
since held a post as assistant in
mathematics. A member of the
American Institute of Electrical En-
gineers, Shannon has also been ini-
tiated by Sigma Xi, scientific honor
society.
Instituted in 1929 in honor of
Alfred Noble, past president of the
American Society of Civil Engineers
and of the Western Society of Engi-
neers, the prize has been presented
seven times, the first award having
been made in 1931. The yearly award
consists of a $500 prize and a certifi-
cate.
The recipient is selected by a com-
Michigan Graduate
Receives Citation

mittee of five representing the Amer-
ican Society of Civil Engineers, the
American Institute of Mining and
Metallurgical Engineers, the Society
of Mechanical Engineers, the Ameri-
can Institute of Electrical Engineers
and, the Western Society of Engin-
eers. The award is made to a mem-
ber of one of these societies" for a
technical paper of particular merit
accepted by the publication commit-
tee of any of the societies for publi-
cation in wholehor in abstract in any
of their respective publications, and
provided that the author istnot over
30 years of age at the time the paper
is accepted in practically its final
form.
By JUNE McKEE -
The life of Charles Wesley will be
dramatized in the "Join the Choir"
broadcast over WJR at 9 a.m. today.
Prof. Joseph E. Maddy commentates
for the last time before leaving for
the West Coast next week, Duane
Nelson, Grad, announces.
"The Family's Responsibility to the
School" is the topic Mrs. E. C. Thomp-
son, president of the Michigan Con-
gress of Parents and Teachers, dis-
cusses over WJR at 12:30 p.m. today
in a special broadcast fromDetroit.
"It Might Happen Anywhere," a
fantasy in which "Some One," "Any
One" and "The One" are personified,
will be enacted by Lucy Jones, Grad.,
Jack Silcott, Grad, Norman Oxhand-
ler and Duane Nelson, Grad, over
WMBC at 2:45 p.m. tomorrow under,
direction of the author, Michael P.
Kinsella. John Gelder, '40, is nar-
rator, Dick Slade, '41, announcer.
A trip to the Speech Clinic and
Laboratory highlights the Campus
Research broadcast, at WJR at 3:30
p.m. Prof. John H. Muyskens of the
speech department will describe the
equipment for scientific study of
speech disorders. Knobby Knobloch
'40, is announcer.

SWEATERS
SOCKS
MITTENS
HOODS
Bright green,

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2.00 GLOVES . . 2.50
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red, yellow and white.

a GAY TYROLEAN ACCESSORIES
Quilted and embroidered velveteens, brushed wools, knits.

Hoods and Caps .
Mittens . .
After-Skating Socks
Ear Muffs .
Lapel Gadgets

. 65c Belts
59c Gart

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ers . . 85c pair

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SUEDE JACKETS . . . Forlmerly 10.50 to 13.50
SUEDE VESTS . . . Formerly 3.95 to 5.95
Really exceptional values on these doeskin-soft suedes. Beau-
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WINTER SPORTS SHOES REDUCED
ICE-SKATES.... Now 1.00 Less
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ELKSKIN SKI SHOES
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Sizes 4 41/ 5 5% 6 6% 7 7Y2 8 81/t9
Ice Skates 15 pr.! 4 pr.! !2 pr.! 17pr.! 4 pr. 1 5pr.
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I

Jhq

'mm

0000000+1100000000000+1 000000 000000000Ii0Yl00000000000

®.

America's foremost interpreter of
science in the news was the title to-
day conferred upon Howard W.
Blakeslee, '05, science editor of the
Associated Press, by the American
College Publicity Association yester-
day.'
The association presented Blake-
slee with the Wilson Fairbanks tro-
phy, awarded annually to the indi-
vidual outside the association who
has done the most for the interpre-
tation of higher education to the
general public. Blakeslee also re-
ceived an honorary master of science
degree here in 1935.

TEK TOOTH BRUSH
23c

SQUIBB TOOTH PASTE
(Medium Size)
2 for 34c
500
CLEANSING TISSUES
16c

SWEETHEART SOAP
3 for 18c
Extra Cake for 1 c
SC H ICK RAZOR
with eight blades
Lifebuoy SHAVING CREAM
49e
$1.00 Size
VITALIS HAIR TONIC

PENQUIN

End-Curl Permanents

BOOKS

MY MAN JEEVES THE DEVIL OF SAXON WALL
THE RASP S-AKESPEARE SONNETS
TEN MINUTE ALIBI LITERARY TASTE
GRAND BABYLON HOTEL THE INVISIBLE MAN

TALES FROM TCHEOF
AN OXFORD TRAGEDY

DEATH AT THE OPERA
FROST IN MAY

and many others
I.4. E~11J - )14

11

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