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January 14, 1940 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE, XiiCHIGA-N 6AILV

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gDAILY OFFICIAL I
Btufr g4LETIN
(Cantinued from Page 4)

presented by members of the
lowshlp.

Fel-

First Presbyterian Church: 10:45
a.m. "Man's Search For His Soul"
will be the subject of Dr. Lemon's
sermon at the Morning Worship Serv-
ice.
4:30 p.m. Westminster Student
Guild group singing in the Lewis-
Vance parlors.
5:30 p.m. Westminster Student
Guild and fellowship hour. Speaker:
Dr. Arabella Gault of the University
of Tsinan, Shantung, China. Sub-

ject: "The Mind and Thought of the
Chinese Vouth." Special music.
baptis% (Dilit 9:311. Graduait,
teacher.
10:45. Morning worship. Sermon
topic,"What Is Your Name?"
12:00. Student Round Table. Dis-
cussion topic: "What Can We Believe
About Baptism?"
6:15. Roger William's Guild in the
Guild House, 503 E. Huron. "Religson
and the University Student," Prof.
J. L. Brumm or Journalism Depart-
ment.
First Church of Christ, Scientist:
Sunday morning service at 10:30.
Subject "Sacrament. Sunday School
at 11:45 a.m.

First Methodist Church:

MorningI

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WIT H ELASTICIZED

Worship service at 10:40 o'clock. Dr
C. W. firashares will.preach or
(hristanity-ris Theology and Re-
stalkee ialli: Student Class a
Stalker Hall at 9:45 a.m. Wesleyan
Guild meeting at 6 p.m. at the Meth-
odist Church. Student presentation
of the subject "I Believe." Fellow-
ship hour and supper following the
meeting.
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church:
Sunday: 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion;
11:00 a.m. Morning Prayer and Ser-
mon by Mr. Kenneth Morgan, Direc-
tor of the Student Religious Associ-
ation; 11:0 Oa.m. Junior Church;
11:00 a.m. Kindergarten in Harris
Hall; 7:00 p.m. Student Meeting in
Harris Hall. Miss Ida Jenks will
speak on "Paul's Correspondence."
On Sunday, Jan. 21, Prof. Leroy
Waterman will speak on the topic,
"How Much of Jesus' Teaching Do
We Get in Spite of Paul?"
The Zion Lutheran Church will
hold its worship services Sunday at
19:30. Sermon by Rev. E. C. Stell-
horn.
Trinity Lutheran Church will hold
its worship services on Sunday at
10:30. Sermon by Rev. H. O. Yoder.
The Ann Arbor Society of Friends
will hold a meeting for worship (based
on silence) at Lane Hall from 5:00 to
6:00 p.m. Sunday.
The Michigan Christian Fellowship
meets Sunday at 4:30 p.m. in Lane
Hall. Mr. C. Stacy Woods, General
Secretary of the Inter-Varity Chris-
tian Fellowship, will be the speaker.,
Disciples Guild (Church of Christ):
10:45 a.m., Morning Worship, Rev.
Frederick Cowin, Minister.
12:00 noon, Student's Bible Class,
H. L. Pickerill, leader.
16:30 p.m., Discussion program,
"My Religion and What It Means to
Me," followed by social hour and re-
freshments.
Alumni Secretary Returns
From Southwestern Trip
T. Hawley Tapping, general secre-
tary of the Alumni Association, will
return to Ann Arbor today, after a
month's sojourn in the southwest.
During his absence he held meet-
ings with Univ4rsity of Michigan
Clubs in Chicago, Phoenix, Los An-
geles, El Paso and Memphis. Friday
he addressed a meeting of the Fifth
District of the American Alumni
'ouncil inChicago.

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Student Writers May, Receive1
FI&,nail -w d*m'Ply
lt---Nva r s; F

Student-written musical plays pro-
duced on campus this yearxor last
may bring their authors rich finan-
cial rewards and a possibility of
Broadway or Hollywood production
under the terms of a recently an-
nounced contest under the auspices
of the American Society of Com';os-
ers, Authors and Publishers.
For the purpose of the competition,
the country has been divided into
eight regions according to the natur-
al geographical and scholastic sub-
divisions, and in each of the regions,
the ASCAP Fellowship will be
awarded to the students who produce
the best script and music for such a,
college play.j
Adjudgment .gf the merits of the
plays produced in the respective re-
gions will be by a committee of three
chosen from the leading college
teachers in the field of music, drama
and creative writing in each of the
regions.
Several plays which were produced
on campus last year or are to be pro-
duced this year are apparently eli-
gible for the contest. The Union
Opera, "Four out of Five," was writ-
ten by Max Hodge, '39, while he was
a student here, and the music is all
student written. Last year's Junior
Girls' Play was written by Richard
McKelvey, then a graduate student,
with several students contributing
the songs. No script has yet been
accepted for this year's JGP, but it
and the music will probably be the
work of students.
The author and composer of the
best play in each region will be
awarded an ASCAP Fellowship ofI
$720, to be used by him in assistingI
the continuance of his work at any

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EdAucational institution which he may
subsequently decide to attend.
In addition, the winning plays from
the eight regions will be given a read-
ing and careful consideration by a
group of leading Broadway play pro-
ducers and also a group of the out-
standing Hollywood photoplay pro-
ducers.
Included with Michigan in Region
IV of the competition are Ohio, In-
diana, Illinois, Tennessee and Ken-
tucky. The final date for submis-
sion of scripts to the respective judg-
ing committee in each region will be
March 15, and final judgment will be
made by the respective committees
not later than May 15 .

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... a shoe with rll the grace and
beauty of the classic opera pump, made
"smoother" ... more perfect-fitting by
is elastcized "spat vest." Tiny tip't
toe... dainty stitched rows... in BLACK

$4.95

TARLIT

HOUR

e~EM C HE ~ N U A I ~1 V 1l:fY!VR1I-l1.

Speech Department
,rfo Sponsor Contest
Six speakers will be chosen tomor-
row to compete for the title of best1
public speaker in Speech 31 sections
in the second intra-departmental
contest of the semester to be held
at 4 p.m. Wednesday in the Natural
Science Auditorium.
Students in each of the 17 speech
31 secitons nominated one of their
numbers to take part in' tomorrow's
elimination series. Members of the
speech department faculty will pick
the six contestants for Wednesday's
finals.

Prof. Bartlett
To Talk Today
OnMalayans
Prof. Harley Bartlett of the botany
department will speak on "The
Malayan Peoples" at 7 p.m. toelay as
the feature of the International Cen-
ter's weekly Sunday evening program.
The regular supper will be given at
6 p.m.
Professor Bartlett will again appear
at the Center at 7 p.m. tomorrow when
he is scheduled to present his motion
pictures on Sumatra.
The past week's activities at the
Center were highlighted by the for-
mation of the latest campus student
organization, Al-Thaqfa--a society of
those students and faculty members
who are interested in the study of
Arabic culture and language. Poli-
tical and economic controversial ques-
tions will have no place in the dis-
cussions and debates of the group,
according to Ismail Khalidi, Grad., of
IJaffa, Palestine, one of the new
group's organizers.
Thursday's program at the Center
will include the regular tea and the
renewal of the Center's Speech Clin-
ic designed to aid foreign students in
acquiring more ability in English con-
versaton.
The Unversity's Little Symphony
orchestra, under the direction of
Thor Johnston, will be .the main at-
traction at the last program of the
semester, appearing at the Center's
Guest Night, to be held at 7 p.m. next
Sunday in the Union Ballroom. Stu-
dents at the Center may bring friends
to this program, which, because of the
large number persons attending, will,
force the elimination of the regular
supper.
Prof. Siosson To Keynote
State YMCA Conference
Ann Arbor will be host to 300 mem-
bers of the first state-wide conven-
tion of the Michigan Young Men's
Christian Association here Friday,
with the Union as conference head-
quarters.
Prof. Preston W. Slosson, of the
history department, will be one of
the speakers. Others who will par-
ticipate in the program are Dr. Har-
din Van Deursen, of the music school,
and Lloyd L. Olsen, a member of the
Ann Arbor Y.M.C.A.

Whatever

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LOVELY DRESSES
for those special

COLLEGIATE SHOE SHOP

nings to which you've
been looking forward.
. 0 -

In ade
eve-

Ee

your type -

Sweet, suave, or sophisti-
cated - we've the dress
to complement you and
your mood!
Above: A soft, floating danc-
ing dress with moulded bod-
ice, a tiny, tiny waistline
sparkling with a sky-full of
"star" rhinestones.
Right: A beautifully cut gown
of faille taffeta in black and
aqua.
FORMAL WEAR from
$16.95 to $29.95

_... .. .. ._ _ _ ,. l.i

4

EveninS and Dinner
GO WNS and WRAPS

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.

pecia tat

$14.95

§ormery to $29.75

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£snart tZijcoepie4

NAGE'

for a girl with head-in-the-clouds, feet-on-the-gro
Head in the clouds over ducky-wucky new clothes and what they do fT
feet on the ground about prices. Young things these days are good m
their spending money. They know full well that Collins is the store for yon

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HE gay season's on, and here
are clothes that will mow down
all your rivals . . . . . Bewitching
Fashions with loads of Glamour
and heaps of style. Priced to clear.
DRESSES in crepes, taffetas, nets,
chiffons, and velvets. Sizes 11-20.
WRAPS of velvets and soft wools

a

Up to

a'

Black - White, Red,

Blue, and

combinations. Sizes 12-18.
EVENING BLOUSES and
JACKETS, rmetal and sequin
$5.95 values at $2.00.
EVENING BAGS at $1.00.

40o
SAVINGS
on
All Fur Coats
CONVENTENT TERMS

7
3
-K
4G

und
or you, but
"anagers of
ung people.
that alkim-
*end. $4.00

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4{ 7{
SUITS . .. $12.95 and up
Shadow plaids

.4k)

PASTEL FELTS
and STRAWS.
$2.95 and up
New Spring BLOUSES
$2.95 and up

PRINTS for-
portant week-

I

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