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December 10, 1939 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-12-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

StiNly. DEC. ifi,,19

Engineering Faculty
A re Invited To Vie
Fo'
For 'Spoof uncup9
Wheni the sixth annuial "Rohast" of
the Michigan branch of the Amer-
can Society of Mechanical Engineers
is held this Wednesday at the Union,
the professors invited will 1ieed their
wits about them.
For immediately after the 6:15
p.m. roast is concluded a "roast-

master" wl beher calling forK
nominations" for thednow-famed oussevitz y, Non-Conformist
"Sofuncup" which is presented
Will Conduc t S1m hn Here
b i .% fi i f m tu g ' a p a b j e o f t a kd n g a " y r. ,v ' i
Di'. Serge Ko lI>.ss viW~~lv siusun lin or~r-rof 1hi; .mnzgiipfg
8ix men are nominated by students .on the Boston Symphony's program lie fiu8 t i d secoiil viofliis on his
who rise and recite past classroom (Thursday in Hill Auditorium of a left; he has experimented with, but
foolishness committed by them. It one-movement American symphony .never adopted, the flat stage; he has
is then the roastmaster's pleasure to and of a Prokofieff fantasy, "Peter interpreted symphonic literature in
direct about four questions at each and the Wolf," is simply another such a manner as in one instance to
"roastee," to discern how calm and llandmark in the trail of nonconform- draw the statement that he made
collected he can remain under verbal ity that the prominent conductor has the orchestra "go through hedges
fire. Ifollowed during his 55 years. backward,' and in another instance,

Housemothers
Defend Moral's
Of Cole ge Gtiis-
Daily Interviewer Finds
Campus Personalities
Aroused By Indictment

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DESIGN for READING

MY LIFE
by HAVELOCK ELLIS . . . . . . . .
JAZZMEN
by FREDERICK RAMSEY, Jr., and
ChARLES E. SMITH.. . . . . .
CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY
by W. SOMERSET MAUGHAM . . .
THE NAZARENE
by SCI H OLEM ASCH........ .

$3.75
$2.75
$2.50
$2.75

First indication that the Russian-
born artist would be no mere tradi-
tionalist came when, as a young man
in the Petrograd Conservatory, he
chose for his required instrument the
double bass while almost every other
young virtuoso inevitably stuck to
the violin.
The next step off the beaten road
came when Dr. Koussevitsky formed
his own orchestra in Petrograd, took
it to Moscow, and as missionary for
Russian music, traveled with it in
1909 for 2,000 miles up the Volga in-
to the rural heart of Russia, agitat-
ing the peasantry only with Beetho-
'ven and Scriabin.
When Dr. Koussevitsky came to
the Boston Symphony in 1924, his
first move as conductor was a suc-
cessful attempt at restoring balanced
programs and a fuller season's rep-
ertory by abolishing the "soloist" sys-
tem. His predecessors at Boston had
begun the movement, but it was only
with his coming that the bait of solo-
ist lists stopped dangling in front of
prospective subscribers. True, in-
strumental and vocal artists may
appear with the orchestra fromh time
to time, but only when the particular
program demands them. No longer
is the program based on audience-
appeal.
In his 12 years with the Boston
Symphony, Dr. Koussevitzky has nev-
er lost this distinct quality of unpre-
dictability. He has changed the seat-

THE LIFE OF GREECE
by WILL DURANT . . . . . . . . . $3.95
':A distinctive book is the best Christmas gift
for everyone on your Christmas list.

THE BOOK
Opposite Angell Hall . . . Phone 5930

ROOM'

to be approved as a staunch upholder
of "academic decorum."
But, most confounding of all to '
most people, he has "dared" to in-
clude on his programs the works of
new American composers, in the
face of criticism smiilar to "I refuse
co pay more than a nickel forsub-
way noises." Recently in New York
he directed the Boston Symphony in
a full program of contemporary
American music, including a concerto1
for violin and two symphonies.
- Goodlelows-Monda y ---
elby To Talk
OnlHealth Here
Lecture To Be On Aspects
Of Industrial Medicine
Discussing "The Relationships of
General and Special Practice in In-
dustrial Medicine," Dr. Clarence D.
Selby, medical consultant of Gen-
eral Motors, will offer the third in
a series of extra-curricular medical
lectures sponsored by the medical
school at 4:15 p.m. Thursday in the
Lecture Hall of the Rackham Build-
ing.
Dr. Selby began his career in 1901
when he served as demonstrator of
histology in Western Reserve Uni-
versity, Cleveland. In 1902, he served
as an assistant to the Cleveland bac-
teriologist. After interning in 1903,
he became resident pathologist in St.
Alexis Hospital, Cleveland.-
Moving to Toledo in 1905, he be-
came visiting surgeon at St. Vin-
cent's Hospital. In 1920, he was
appointed chief of staff and held
that office until 1926.
Public health offices held by fir.
Selby include Commissioner of Health
from 1916 to 1918, consulting hy-
gienist to the U.S. Public Health
Service from 1918 to 1919, and secre-
tary of the section on preventive
medicine and public health of the
AMA in 1920.
He was appointed medical consul-
tant to General Motors in 1935. In
addition to serving as medical con-
sultant, he as a visiting surgeon at
Flower Hospital, Toledo.
--Goodfelows-Mon day -
Clancy To Speak Here
Denis Clancy of Hillsdale will speak
at a luncheon of the Ann Arbor
League of Women Voters at 12:30
p.m., Dec. 13 in the League. Mr.
Clancy will speak on'the subject "The
Problem of the Crippled Child in
Michigan," and will answer ques-
tions in the discussion period that
will follow.

"In my day, of course, the dean of
women and the dean of men would,
have taken firm steps," wrote a sor-
ority sponsor in an indictment of col-
lege girls' morals in Liberty maga--
zine of Feb. 2.
The author pointed out the change
that has taken place in moral atti-
tudes since "her day." She described
four or five specific immoral situa-
tions, and then said, "We were neith- [
er prudes nor puritans, but we held
some very positive ideas about the
value of a reputation for modesty, vir-
tue and integrity."
Various campus personalities, when
approached on the subject, expressed
attitudes ranging from indignation
to almost passive disregard.
Haven't' Dropped At All
Mrs. Byrl F. Bacher, assis;ant dean
of women, said, "I think a lot of
people do a lot of talking about things
like thiA but I don't believe college
morals have dropped at all. A lady
is always a lady."
Commenting on the author's state-
ment that the college students phi-
losophy seems to be one of consum-
mate opportunism, Mrs. Bacher said
that she doesn't believe that that is.
the attitude of society at large. This,
attitude isn't any different from that
of our day or our mothers' day, she
said.
When students think about the fu-
ture, Mrs. Bacher commented, they
may not be as serious about it as
their parents were, but that is due to
the fact that everything we do now
receives less pondering. "What I ask
for is not more morals but more time
to think," she said.
Nothing Of That Type
Mrs. H. M. Roberson, housemother
at Collegiate Sorosis, commented that
it would be fitting for the sorority
sponsor and author to tell where she
came from. "I've been here a long
time, and I've never seen anything
of that type," she said. The only
difference in today's students, she
said, is that they are a trifle too
frank, they are not quite as fine as
they used to be. A lot of things they
talk about would be better unsaid,!
she remarked.
Mrs. Leona B. Diekema, house
mother at Martha Cook, commented
that she thought specific, not general
instances were considered by the
writer. Students today have less re-
gard for conventions, she said, but
conventions also change. This does
not necessarily justify the adoption
of any of these conventions, however,
she remarked. There is less attitude
for reverence among today's students,
she said. That's what is wrong to-
day. There is little regard for the
sanctity of word and deed.

ment.
name
they
it --
floral,
light,,
tialed,
such
colors.

You
it,
have
plain,
dar
and mss :.
lovely
Fort

CHRISTMAS ANGEL FOR AN
ANGEL! And this is no bluff.
To be exact it is one of Helena
Rubinstein's gentlest aromas for
the girls of your heart. QUARRY
has had experience
{ in knowing what
one should buy in
the line of perfume
-you wouldn't be
sorry if you took
their advice. It
comes in two sizes.
Match your own purse, and also
in an attractive box which would
look so nice under the Christmas
tree. It is a charming, tantalizing
Slumber Song, night perfume.
Just perfect for inducing sweet
dreams. And what a heavenly
fragrance. Christmas Angel is
waiting for you-at Quarry.
* * *
MERRY CHRISTMAS TO
YOU from GAGE! And I'm sure
a gift from Gage would make
someone else have a Merry Christ-
mas too. One of their good look-
ing handkerchiefs would make
such a useful and personal gift.
Don't forget people like to' be
practical. And they have such a
large assort-

sle. Don't worry with hair trouble
while you are home. Time's fleet-
ing-don't get caught napping!
SIX MORE DAYS TO VACA-
TION, then you'll go to the sta-
tion. But don't go home empty-
handed, for yourself or your
friends. Get that shopping over
here, and DILLONS is the place.
Their suggestions include sweat-
ers, stockings and jewelry. The
jewelry is very nice. Gold is the
predominate color, it matches so
well and dresses
anything up. They
a have necklaces,
belts, cameos, loc-
kets and bracelets.
Could be? As
for stockings they
have 2, 3 and 4
thread, all prices and all colors.
'Tis well to choose carefully for
sleek legs are such an asset these
days. In the sweaters, they have
the regular run. An embroidered
one had long sleeves and was hea-
vy for skiing. Don't forget, it's
Dillons.
TRAVELING TIME IS HERE
AGAIN. And here's CALKINS-
FLETCHER again with hints for
you. Don't be bothered with lit-
tle cosmetic articles, collect them
in a compact and handy case and
your trouble will be gone. They
have some lovely
ones. With rubber
lining and big roo-
my pockets, it's just
the thing. And for
you snifflers, they
have something
new and so much
nicer. A case for tissues. It is
flat and would fit most any place.
Don't fret with traveling, make
it a joy-be fully equipped.
*' * *
QUALITY AND QUANTITY,
'tis new and different, but that is
what the CAMPUS SHOPPE gives
you in sweaters. As for quality,
who does not appreciate the fine-
ness of lovely, cashmere sweaters?
Soft and warm, good looking and
lasting. What more could one

iii

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GR ENE'S
will

women we
suggest the
plain white, dainty hanky with
initial. These are what they like
to carry at bridge parties, etc.
Thenthe colors for the younger
ones, for they like to complement
their costumes. They are just the
thing. Get them at Gage.
* * *
CALL UP, CALL UP, WHERE-
VER YOU ARE! The number,
7561-the place, the RAGGEDY-
ANN BEAUTY SHOP. It's worth
your while fo'r they are now fea-
turing their Holiday Special, per-
manents.'I'll wa-
ger 'tis time for
many a girl to
see her hair cur-
ly again. And
don't you want
to be miserable
,during the win-
' , '" ter days to come
with your hair
- hanging down.
- Now with a bar-
gain and with fine operators at
your convenience, take advantage.
Get it done before the holiday tus-

ing of the

ask? And Angoras,
those fluffy bits which
flatter you so,. need I
say more? As for
quantity, you're all
fixed there too. Here
I am not only speak-
numbers in stock, but

I

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A

in the numbers of colors which
are represented. Every color in
the rainbow, and such unusual
ones too. Any girl would be proud
to wear a sweater from the Cam-
pus Shoppe.

/

JC

VI

[ Im IM",

your GLOVES!
We have a small sewing machine
'specially designed to sew up glove

v

Sho
:4 FOLLI
UseI
Chec
c Your
Gon
"iiFictioni.

!) at

III'

rips and nothing

else . .

. so your

this
[k List for
r Guide to
I Giving:

off'
4
fit
a

-O "''nom

IYO NS 4L
-I
4 -
\ s
'Si

. e

!1
f
r
tAIL
t *.
AIZM

Gloves

can be stitched with the

same glove stitch the manufacturer
uses.
Dial 23-23-I
NIn rb arw n n hicLuiih anu A l i p

I

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CHILDREN OF GOD.......... .
CHRIST IN CONCRETE ...... .
CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY........... .
DR. HUDSON'S SECRET JOURNAL.
ESC A PE .........................
IT TAKES ALL KINDS.,.......... .
KITTY FOYLE ...................
MOMENT IN PEKING ............ .

.. Fisher
di Donata
. . Maugham
.... Douglas
. . . Vance
... Bromfield
.... Morley
Lin Yutang

$3.00
$2.50
$2.50
$2.50
$2.50
$3.00
$2.50
$3.00

...Non-Fiction -.-.-.
AUTOBIOGRAPHY ....................Milne $3.00
COUNTRY LAWYER .. . .Partridge $2.75
DAYS OF OUR YEARS.. ........ .. van Paassen $3.50
I LOST MY ENGLISH ACCENT ...... Thompson $2.00
INSIDE ASIA . ........................ Gunther $3.50
NOT PEACE BUT A SWORD ............ Sheean $2.75
REACHING FOR THE STARS........ Waln $3.00
A TREASURY OF ART MASTERPIECES. Craven $10.00
CHRISTMAS CARDS
2 for 5c; 5c; 10c and 25c

I onilorrow -
THE ANNUAL
GOODFELLOW ISSUE
of
The Michigan Daily
Will Be On Sale
All proceeds from single copy sales and
n nr *. e icnn twill n ivcon in +.Inrnr,, I rkn

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