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December 10, 1939 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-12-10

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DEC. 10, 1939

PAGE SIX SUNDAY, DEC. 10, 1939

Bill Gail's Band Will Play For "Capricorn Capers"

k.1

Ede Righ

deal Hober, 'Messiah' Singer'
Is Iraressed With Ann Arbor

Gives H er

Comparison mention the subject of music. Here

1.v_ _ .

Of College Campuses
Seen On Many Visits
By FRANCES MENDELSON
An amazingly low throaty voice
characterizes Miss Beal ilober, the
guest soprano who will sing in Han-
del's "Messiah," which is being pre-
sented today in Hill Auditorium.
Miss Hober, a tall, Junoesque,
blonde woman with a disconcerting-
ly boyish grin, could use nothing but
superlatives at the merest mention.
of Ann Arbor and the University. "I.
have been to Detroit before," she said,
"but never to Ann Arbor. I didn't
know what I was missing. This place
is, fascinating, simply fascinating."
Miss Hober compared our campus
which, she confided, she has thor-
oughly inspected in her every spare
moment since she arrived, to that of
Yale University. Both, she admitted,
are lovely places, but Yale doesn't
even compare, in her estimation, to
Michigan.
Praises Union
Even the Union, where Miss Hober
was staying, came in for its due share
of praise. The interior monastic
type of architecture, she said, gives;
one he impression that he is any-
where but on a Middle-western cam-
pus. "There is one thing I can't;
understand, however, and that is why
they won't let women enter through
the front door. I tried leaving
through it and a man stopped me. I
was perfectly furious for a minute,"
Miss Hober admitted with a rueful
smile. "Oh well," she said philosophi-
cally, "It probably boosts the men's
ego to make the women use the back
entrance, and I certainly won't be
grudge them their fun."
It was not until Miss Hober had
thoroughly exclaimed the virtues of
the Michigan campus and its "very
cute students," that she would. even

again, her first comments were di-
rected toward the University. The'
University orchestra, according tol
Miss Hober, sounds as good, if not
better than most professional ones.
"And I have heard and sung with a
good many orchestras," she added1
with her abrupt smile.
Has Love For Music
As for Thor Johnson, the conductor
of the University orchestra, Miss
Hober could find no new words of
praise. "He is nothing short of won-
derful-it is a great pleasure to work
with a man of his ability and charm.
It makes a lot of difference, to a
guest soloist especially, whether the
conductor is pleasant or just an old
grouch."
MissgHober said that she could not
remember any particular incident
which started her on the career which
has made her one of the leading so-
pranos of the day. She has always
loved music, she said, and as far back1
as she can remember, she has loved
to sing. "I can never remember hav-
ing had any other ambition than to
be a great singer," Miss Hober added.
Has Been Guest Artist
Within the past few years, Miss
Hober has sung as guest soprano with
an impressive number of orchestras.
Last winter she had several engage-
ments with the Detroit Symphony,
and she also sang with the Boston
Symphony and the New York Phil-
harmonic orchestra. Here recent
tours have also included the Phila-
delphia Symphony, the Rochester
Philharmonic, and she has performed
in Pittsburg and Midland.
At the present time, interupted only
by her trip to Ann Arbor, Miss Hober
is working on a solo recital which she
is to give Jan. 19, in Town Hall
in New York.
-Goodfellows-Monday -
Hunter College is doing special re-
search on the study habits of its
undergraduates.

Woman Student
Will Be Chosen
To Sing Solos
Assembly Representatives
Selected In Dormitories
As Heads Of Ticket Sale
Bill Gail and his orchestra have been
Sengagedto play at "Capricorn Ca-
pers," the dance sponsored by the
Dormitory Board of Assembly to be
given Saturday, Jan. 6, in the League
Ballroom, Victoria Gellatly, '41, gen-
eral chairman, announced last night.
The soloist, who as yet has not been
selected, wilL be a woman in the
University.
Tickets for this dance, to which all
independent women have the privi-
lege of inviting the men, will go on
sale Monday in all the dormitories,
Miss Gellatly stated. Special Assemb-
ly representatives have been appoint-
ed in each dormitory to be in charge
of the sale.
Captains in charge of ticket sales
in each of the dormitories are: Helen
Newberry, Ellen Redner, '40; Betsy
Barbour, Johanna Skurla, '42; Mosher
Jordan, June Frederick, '41; Martha
Cook, Betty Lyman, '41; Adelia
Cheever, Christine Chambers, '42A;
Alumnae House, Betty Lou Witters,
'41Ed, and Ann Arbor Independents,
Norma Ginsberg, '41. League houses
will be represented by one woman
from each house.
There will be important meetings
of the publicity and decorations com-
mittees, Miss Gellatly stated further,
at, 3 p.m. tomorrow in the League.
Central committee will meet at 4:30
p.m. tomorrow in the Undergraduate
office of the League.
The theme of the dance is centered
around the signs of the zodiac, in
keeping with the beginning of the
new year and what will follow during
the year. Fortune tellers and astrolo-
gers will be one of the main attrac-
tions at the dance.
This dance is being given by the

Military Styles Popular

Third Ruthven
Tea Scheduled
For Wednesday
Social Committee Names
14 ' Assistants; Invites
Nine Campus GroupsI

t
a
1

MWOWWW WWWWWWDormitory Board in order to raise
Stheircontribution for the assembly
treasury.
A 1/2 OFF on Dark Shades -Godfelows-Monday -
(Wines, greens, black, brown) , Combination Program
Will Be Given By Guild
24 of f on Ma ny others "The Origin of Christmas Carols"
will be the subject of a combination
musical and discussion program to
Take home LARKWOOD hosiery in holiday boxes be held at 6:15 p.m. today by the Rog-
for Christmas giving. Two pair boxed . . . $2.00 er William Guild, the Baptist stu-
dent organization. The affair will,
PARKA HOODS and matching mittens take place at the Guild House, and
for holiday sports. Ruth Enss, '41SM, vice-president of
the organization,,will direct.
Other officers of the group this
/ ' ' Syear are Russell Van Cleve, '40E,
V president; Christine Chambers, '42A,
Shop of Distinctive Aiillinery secretary; and Harold Goeller, 42E,
E4ftreasurer. Adviser to the group is
613 East William 4 Doors Off State Rev. Chet Loucks, of the Baptist
I Church.

Fellowship To Give Party
Congregational Student Fellowship,
will sponsor a Christmas party for
22 underprivileged boys from Perry
Center at 5:45 p.m. today at the
church. A fee of 40 cents will be
charged members for the supper and
for entertaining the boys. Among
the entertainments will be movies,
games and Santa Claus.
WAA SPORTS SCHEDULE
Basketball Tournament: Zone
VII vs. Zone III, Ann Arbor Inde-
pendents vs. Palmer House at 5:10
p.m. Monday; Mosher vs. Alpha
Epsilon Phi, Martha Cook X vs.
Phi Sigma Sigma at 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday; CollegiateaSorosis vs.
Gamma Phi Beta, Chi Omega vs.
Alumnae House at 5:10 p.m. Tues-
day; Alpha Delta Pi vs. Zeta Tau
Alpha, Delta Delta Delta vs. Zone
VIII at 5:10 p.m. Wednesday:
Kappa Alpha Theta vs. Betsy Bar-
bour, Jordan vs. Kappa Delta, at
4:30 p.m. Thursday; Delta Gam-
ma vs. Pi Beta Phi at 5:10 p.m.
Thursday.
Bowling Tournament: Individual
tournament will be played" from 3
to 6 p.m. tomorrow at the Wom-
en's Athletic Building alleys.
Badminton: 7:15 p.m. Wednes-
day for men and women, 4:30 to 6
p.m. Friday for women students.
Dance Club: No meeting this
week.
Swimming Club: No meeting this
week.
Outdoor Sports: No meeting this
week.

President and Mrs. Ruthven will
open their home to students again
from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday for the
third Ruthven tea of this year's series,
with the social committee in charge
of arrangements.
Groups especially invited to the
tea are Phi Delta Theta, Martha1
Cook, Pi Beta Phi, Sigma Chi, and1
orientation groups 28, 33, 50, 81 and°
79.
Women who will pour at the tea1
are Mrs. George Cod, Mrs. G. J. Dyke-
ma, Suzanne Potter, '40, and Kath-
erine McIvor, '40. Assisting will be
Betty Ann Chaufty, '41; Suzanne
Bentley, '42; Mary Haydn, '42; Claire
Reed-Hill, '42; Helen Rigterink, '41;
Betty Lipton, '41; Jane Griswold, '41;
Janet Hiatt, '42; Jean Luxen, '41 and
Barbara Booker, '41.
Mary Minor, '40, chairman of the
social committee, said that all mem-
bers of the committee must attend,
and she urged that they arrive on
time and stay until 6 p.m.
Those whose last names begin with
the initials A-H will be in the dining
room, and those from H-Z will be
in the receiving line.
All students are welcome to attend
the tea, although the groups men-
tioned above are extended a special
invitation by the committee.
Be A Goodfellow
B allet Director
To Speak Here
Lincoln Kirstein Will Give
Talk On Dance History
Lincoln Kirstein, arector of the
Ballet Caravan and dance critic for
the New Republic, will present a lec-
ture illustrated by slides on "History
of the Dance" at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow,
at the Women's Athletic Building.
Included in the slide series will be
rare paintings based upon a collec-
tion at the British Museum, and up-
on ancient vases and wall paintings,
also at the museum.
"Kirstein has written the most
scholarly piece of work in the field
of dance history in recent years,"
commented Miss Bloomer, director of
the Dance Club. Among his works are
"Dance, a short history of Theatrical
Dance," which is his best known piece
of research. "Blast at Ballet," written
in the style of the 18th century
pamphleteers, is a corrective study for
American audiences. Much quoted
is its comment "All Americans think
that Russian Ballet is one word." On
the press now, and to appear very
soon is his latest book, "The ABC of
Ballet."
Kirstein, a graduate of Harvard
University, has been endeavoring
through his books and through his
Ballet troupe, to prove that the art of
dancing is not one to be excluded
from the American curriculum of
theatrics.
The program is to take the place of
the Annual Dance Club Christmas
presentation. All members of the
University interested in the subject
are invited to attend.

Candidacy Bids
For Three Dance
Events Are Filed
Approximately 50 petitions were
turned in for candidacy on the Frosh
Frolic and Senior Ball dance elections
before yesterday's deadline, accord-
ing to Carl Wheeler, '40E, head of
the Men's Judiciary Council. The
petitions of the Business Administra-
tion school were turned in in the
orm of two party tickets, he said.
All three elections will be held
Wednesday. Voting in the business
school elections will be held from
10 a.m. until 12 noon, and dance elec-
tions from 1 to 5 p.m. A member of
the engineering school will be gen-
eral chairman of the both dance
committees in accordance with a ro-
tating system.
-- Goodfcllows--Monday --
To Give Christmas Tea
Pi Lambda Theta, educational
sorority, will give a Christmas tea in
honor of the faculty of the School of
Education from 6 to 7:30 p.m. today
in the University Elementary School
Library.

I
ME ET T HE NEWEST
N EMO
There's something new in smart
corsetry: ANGLE-PULL elastic!
Its diagonal "pull" not only re-
stans the diaphragm . .. not
only maoulds your waist and hips
itfahio nalns..i alo
posture. A smart girdle for a
smart girl.

9



mm omomwmw

V-

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BOB GACH
HAS YOUR PICTURE

4

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BE SURE TO STOP at the
GACH CAMERA SHOP and
look over the pictures taken
at the dance last night.
Keep a photo record of
your college parties.
Nickels Arcade

All sizes 25-30

.. $350

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MOTHER, SISTER,
COUSIN KAY, GIRL FRIEND
AND AUNTS - ALL SAY:-

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