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December 01, 1939 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

oks, Outlasting Christmas Season, Provide Gift Solu

tion

Best Seller Lists Offer Myriad
Suggestions To Would-Be Donor

Argyles Still Most Popular
A mong Christmas Gift
Ribbed Lisle In Various
Colors Also Rates High
On The List For Presents
They used to say of a certain mo-
tion picture star of short stature that
every season his pants went up an
inch and his heels went down an S
inch. ;a
A condition slightly similar has ?
persisted on this campus for sev-
eral years. For a long time pants .
kept going steadily higher until an
absolutee maximum of heighth was
reached, but those pants also left as
goodly distance between their bot-
toms and the ground.
From this has come the current
fashion, followed by many here, of;
wearing "high water" pants. Pants,
are now worn anywhere from touch
ing the ground (a pratcice followed
by the uninitiate) to high above the
boot tops. Thus a lot of sock is
shown, and there is occasioned, con-
quently, the necessity of paying more
attention to their choice.
Whereas., formerly, students wore
any kind of sick in any kind of way,
now they know their socks have a
large audience and, therefore, are

j

Hose Fashion Is Spinach' To Man
Donors Who Knew Styles Of The

Past

By HER VIE HAUFLER
They sent me out yesterday to dig
iup some notes on fashion, but the
only thing I could find was an old
man who scowled at fashions and
everything connected with fa-
shions.
"So you're huntin' the latest fads,
eh?" he inquired in a sarcastic tone.
"Well, I can show you a thing or
two, but it's probably nothing you
can use in any fashion article. I
don't like, fashions,"
I said, "Well, it is pretty hard to
keep up with them. They make you
dizzy."
"They're foolish, that's what they
are," he said pugnaciously. He picked
up a picture magazine there in his
shop. "I make my living from 'em
but they're foolish just the same."
Leafing through the magazine he
opened it at a feature section devot-
ed to quaint dresses of past decades,
the sort of article that is good for
a smile occasionally. There were
old photos of women proudly display-
ing great masses of fancy crinolines;
of bustled ladies with incredibly
small wastes, of smiling lasses with
hair-dos that might have come from
Dali.
"Just look at 'em," the old man
said. "They make you laugh, don't
they? That's what they're supposed
to do. But you don't see that here
are some of the loveliest women of
their ages, the proudest and most
sought-after beauties of their de-
cade.
"See how they're beamin' and smil-

[have of them. That's what fashion
did for them.
"Now just imagine the resentment
a man must feel toward fashions
when he realizes that someone who
means a lot to him has become a
laughingstock simply because they
got on the fashion bandwagon back
there a decade or so ago. Thinly how
the kinfolks of these ladies here in
the magazine must feel."
He waved his hand as if to dismiss
me, "Go on and write about your
fashions," he said. "Tell the girls
to wear these long wool socks that
aren't anything but eyesores, though
they're the fashion all right. Tell
the boys to wear these flat hats that
look like cheeseboxes with a brim.
"But me, I can't tell you anything
about fashions."
Billfold Gifts Adjusted
To Recipient's Penury
Always pleasing as a gift, the bill-
fold is welcomed by any man.
If the giver wishes the receiver to
think that he is respected, he should
buy a very thick and pretentious bill-
fold. Thus, the proud receiver will
think that others think he is a "big
man." Such a feeling does much
good to the heart of anyone.
University Seal Popular
A gift desired by most Michigan
students is the University's seal, ap-

quite discriminating.
This year, as has been the case of
late, students still lean toward ar-
gyle plaids with a host of new pat-
terns and colors enlivening the pic-
ture. This type can be found to
match almost any suit and pocket-
book, with materials ranging from
cheaper weaves to imported wools.
New this year are pastel colors
and ribbed knits in camel's hair and
cashmeres.rAlso popular are Eng-
lish and French lisles of all colors.
Dark solid color ribbed hose are
always good while the man who
dresses formally on occasion can do
wel with an adequate supply of
solid black silk hose. There are also
sport hose of various sorts that make
desirable gifts. These include ordi-
nary sweat socks, colore dtop skat-
ing and skiing hose and long heavy
wool hose for wear with high top
boots.
Persons purchasing hosiery for
others should endeavor to find out
correct sizes, asp many recipients of
incorrectly sized sox neglect to ex-
change them and merely do not wear
them, it was said by a retailer.
The wearing of garters has gone
up in accordance with the high pants
custom and stores, this season offer
a great variety of multi-colored ones.
While the elastic type hose top is
still popular, garters are being worn
more than ever. They can be had
are available in single grip or double.
King Has Impeccable
Taste, Asserts Tailor I
Harry Benson, tailor to His Majesty
King George VI of England, has a
few opinions -on the current trend in
men's fashions. Stripes are here to
stay, he 'says, as well as the three-
button jacket.
His Majesty's own tastes, declared
Benson, are impeccable. "Of course,"
he says, "His Majesty is conservative
in dress, but let it not be said that he
is old fashioned. Well turned-out
Englishmen never are. Moreover,
such men care little for style as such.
They want to be 'properly dressed'
rather than 'well dressed'."
In London the Anthony Eden Hom-
burg seems to be another favorite
destined to survive the fickle currents
of fashion. As one Mayfair hatter
has said, "That hat has become too
firmly established to be blown off by
a political breeze . . . the way we
make them."

this year in plaids of all colors and
also in solid colors and stripes. They
Most young men prefer the single
grip type because of the greater
freedom afforded.

stdnsih nvest' el p
in', proud that the camera is catch- propriately worn on key or watch
in' those new dresses of theirs. They chain. With the old type watch chain
were beauties and their outlandish making a solid comeback, it makes
clothes ruin any appreciation we a good watch charm.

L
£4 "portng"Gift
Ffrom MOE'S
t
C. C. M. SKATES
with the finest tempered steel blades made
for men, women, and children. A fine gift
for the hockey player or social ,skater.
~3
-i 9
BADMINTON AND SQUASH
rackets for use throughout the indoor sport 9
season. Finest frames and silk or gut
strings. Exercise that will keep you fit all
winter.
BASKETBII o n jris
eq~pnent, shoes, trunks,sox and e
We have a large selection of fine leather
basketballs. Join in one of the most pop-
ular winter games. A fine gift for young
gnen
4 KII]MG
is rapidly becoming a leading
outdoor winter sport. A fine
pair of skis, ski shoes or poles as
well as wool pants, sox or cap,
make fine Christmas gifts for
r gmen or women,

N

We Are H eady
for Ck it nas
A ROBE is an ideal gift
and so practical! Full Selec-
tion. $4.95 to $10.95
1 Cocktail Coats-$6.95
Could you think of anything
he would enjoy more than a
JACKET? Ours is the largest
selection ir town.
A SWEATER is just the
thing for him. Ours are all

i.

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