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November 22, 1939 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

TIHE M IEAHICA N D A LY A

WEDNESDAY, NO V. 22, 1029

Philharmonic
Group To Play
Here Monday-
Choral Union To Present
New York Orchestra;'
Barbirolli To Conduct
The New York Philharmonic-Sym-
phony Orchestra, which comes to Ann
Arbor for the first time in its history
to play in the fourth concert of the
current Choral Union Series at 8:30
p.m. Monday in Hill Auditorium, is
the result of the merger of two or- j
ehestras.
The orchestra, formed in 1930 by
the union of the 'old New York Sym-
phony and Philharmonic orchestras,
rose swiftly to prominence under the
baton of ace conductor Arturo Tos-
canini, who presided over the organi-
zation for several years. He was fol-I
lowedrby a succession of guest con-
ductors.
In 1937, the present conductor of
the Philharmonic, John Barbirolli
took over the baton. Barbiroli, an
Englishman, comes of Italian and
French background. He has con-
ducted the London Symphony Or-
chestra and the Royal Philharmonic
Society concerts, and has been perma-
z entconductor of the Scottish Or-
chestra and the Leeds Symphony.
Counting the years of the two sep-
arate orchestras, the Philharmonic-
Symphony is the oldest orchestra in
the United States and is the third
oldest in the world. It has grown
rapidly from a membership of 63 to
the present 104.
Gatward Addresses
* j"

Is She Next For Coogan

Engineering

Group

The Michigan branch of the Ameri-
can Institute of Electrical Engineer-
ing was addressed at 8 p.m. yesterday'
in the Michigan Union by W. A. Gat-
ward, chief engnieer of a Detroit
manufacturing concern.
Mr. Gatward talked on "The Manu-
facture of Nickle-Chrome Alloys and
their Uses in the Electrical Heating
Industry."}
r

Jackie Coogan, former child movi
star, said at Fort Wayne, Ind., tha
he would marry Harriet Haddo
(above), now playing in an ice re
view in New York, after his divorc
from Betty Grable becomes fina
in 10 months. This picture wa
made two years ago when she wa
playing in the film "Thrill of,;
Lifetime" which starred, among
others, Miss Grable.
Digging Undermined
By Zoning Ordinanc
Arthur Ross of Detroit, Tuesd
night requested the city council f
permission to continue the excav
tion for an underground 2,000 go
Ion gasoline storage tank at the gas
line station at 627 North Main Stre
Ross started excavation without b
ing aware that it was contrary
zoning ordinances, his attorneys sa
Work on the digging has been halt
awaiting action by the council.

LANDERS
--OR
LOWERS

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High Schools'
Debate Teams
To Meet Here
Winners Of Second Round
To Vie For First Place'
In Finals Next May
Debaters from more than 250 high
schools in Michigan will meet in the
second round of the season's elimina-
tion contests this week in a tourna-
ment which will bring the winners
to Hill Auditorium for the final con-
test early next May.
The question chosen for the 23rd
annual series of Michigan High
School Forensic Association tourna-
ments is "Resolved: That the Federal
Government Should Own and Oper-
ate the Railroads," Arthur Secord,
chairman of the society, :,aid yester-
day. The association is a division of
the TTniversity Extension Service.
Following the custom started by
their sports departments, the upper
Peninsula schools this year withdrew
their debate teams from competition
with those of the Lower Peninsula.
A new dark walnut column sur-
mounted by a gleaming bronze statue
of the spirit of education will be
presented by the association to the
two finalist teams this year instead of
the customary cup. To the two semi-
finalist squads will be given tro-
phies of the spirit of learning.
Gold Watches Donated
Gold watches, donated by the De-
tgoit Free Press, will be awarded to
each of thersix debaters who reach
the finals and dictionaries embossed
with the winners' initials will be giv-
en to each person who survives the
first series of eliminationicontests.
Certificates of participation are
awarded to each active debater in the
member schools.
In last year's final contest, Flint
Central debaters won a unanimous
decision over the Battle Creek nega-
tive team in the discussion of the
question, "Resolved, That the United
States Should Establish An Alliance
With Great Britain."
Flint Affirmative
The Flint affirmative, consisting
of William Siegel, William Pierce,
and Watson Pierce was coached by
Harold E. Hawley of Flint Central
High School. Stuart Main, Raymond
Davis, and Robert Gibson, coached by
John W. Postma of Battle Creek
High School, composed the negative
teami. Teamns of both schools had
been in previous finals.
Faculty Sleuths
Reveal 'rant'
As Opera Leadl
(C~otined from Pageo 1)
voice came from nowhere to an -
nounce, "I am Lee Grant"; who sup-
posedly told Coach Crisler how to
run the football team. As leader of
the freshman class he insisted that
the "pot" was a sign of nobility and
should be worn by all freshmen.
Fury Finds Outlet
Sophomore fury eventually found
an outlet on three suspected aids of
Grant-Tom Dalrymple, '43, Robert
Cavanaugh, '43, and Floyd Harrison,
41E. The three received a free hair-
cut-of the entire scalp, a brand new
paint job and pants-removing service
Dan Bursley finally "cracked" the
case by remembering that "Lee
Grant" was the name of the leading
character in the script of the Opera.
The handwriting survey had nar-

rowed down to Cavanaugh, who was
hailed before the Dean and Dr. Rob-
bins. After submitting Cavanaugh to
a third degree, the Dean and the
Doctor burst out laughing and con-
sidered the case closed.
Credits Group
Heinen credited a group consisting
>f freshmen, led by Dalrymple, with
naking the hoax possible by con-
ributing many of the ideas as well
as most of the actual work. In the
group were: Robert Mantho, '43, Ed-
ward Taylor, '43, Richard Lee, '43,
Abbott Salter, '43, Fred Peterson,
42E, Carl G. Peterson, '43E, Mo-
hammed Darwich, '43, Dalrymple,
Harrison, Cavanaugh and Mrs. L, M.
Domm, their house mother.
Upperclassmen who cooperated
with Heinen are: Harry Howell, '40E,
who actually impersonated Grant
twice, Beatrice Snoke, '42, William
Small, '40A, John Mills, '40E, Mary
Ellen Spurgeon, '40, and Morton L.
Linder, '40,
When asked what difficulties were
ncountered in working the hoax,
Ieinen said, "We had trouble fooling
he fellows, but the girls were easy.
What is this I hear about JGP?"

/nItiWar Committee
Plans Series Of Talks
It was resolved at a recent execu-
tive council meeting of the Michigan
Anti-War Committee that the United
States should concentrate its efforts
on making democracy work in this
country before going out of its way to
interfere in foreign affairs, according
to William Meuhl, '41, chairman of
the committee.
Tentative plans were made for a
general meeting at which qualified
speakers will lay groundwork for a
series of talks outlining a positive
peace program for America.
A lecture on "Pan-Americanism and
the Present War," will be given at a
meeting in the near future, Meuhl
said, and will point. out the advan-
tages of relationship with South
America to help establish a perma-
ent peace.

Students Questioned
On Triple-Cut Rule
(Continued from Page 1)
missed any important points in the
course. Why not leave it at that?"
Virginia Keilholtz. '41: ''The pur-
pose of the regulation is to encour-
age people to stay in Ann Arbor
over the holidays, but it doesn't ap-
pear to have a great effect in that
direction. Many students leave any-
way, and I believe professors as a
whole are quite lenient."
Betty Pusch, '41: "No, and I be-
lieve we should have Friday entirely
off so that more people could go
home. What is Thanksgiving with-
out home and fireside?"
Frederick C. Osberg, '39E: "I per-
sonally am in favor of education if
you want to be educated, but there
is no point in forcing it upon us."

Prof. Slosson To Talk
At Community Forum
Prof. Preston Slosson, of the His-
tory Department, will discuss "The

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Christmas
Photographs
GIVE a Personal gift
this Christmas - your photo-
graph.

SENIORS, remember that you must have made
your appointment for your Ensian pictures by
Saturday, December the second.

_
I

Served from 12 Noon to 3 P. M. and 5 P. M. to 8 P. M.
75c (plus tax)
Choice of ONE
Chilled Tomato Juice Head Lettuce Salad, Dressing
Cream .of Chicken Soup Chilled Grape Juice
Branch Celery Mixed Olives Sweet Pickles
Salted Nuts
Assorted Rolls or Bread
Choice of ONE
Stuffed Michigan' Turkey with Chestnut Dressing
Roast Alma Duckling with Apple Filling
Broiled T Bone Steak
Choice of TWO
French Fried Potatoes Mashed Potatoes Fresh Peas
Mashed Hubbard Squash dButtered Boiled Onions
Choice of ONE
Mince, Pumpkin or Apple Pie Vanilla Ice Cream
English Plum Pudding

Taproom

e.1 s? UAA"t..iALAA"PW1I Al 1'WA!!'.L $ . ..v ... ,.

t Photographer
332 South State

Coffee Tea Milk Sweet Cider

Hot Chocolate

UNION TAPROOM
FOR MICHIGAN MEN

Dial 5031

I'

I

Swee's

106 East Washington Street
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Phones 9690 and 2-4431

Underlying Issues in.the Present
World War", at the Ann Arbor Comn-
munity forum at 8 p.m. Monday in
the Ann Arbor high school auditori-
um. A question and anmwer. period
will follow the address.

YOU, TOO, CAN BE
& QUARTERBACK.

"1

a

. _ i

WE 0
WEDNESDA"Y
LUNCHEON MENU
INDIVIDUAL CHICKEN PIE
with Vegetables
Salad Buttered Rolls
25c
CUT-RATE DRUGS
PRESCRIPTION SERVICE
MODERN FOUNTAIN
COSMETICS
1225 South University.

150? Doesn't matter. You cant Pult
* You only weigh c150e ex la-right---
or Pass? Okay. But can you call the next Plas?Notret
in 30scnswt the mob howling in you easIor
Dam es ach Elmer ayden reveals how quarterbac
pamirac lhe bag with tactical kulduggerY-.
pull miracles of bt America's greatest quarter-
tolsdoes of yarns aboutAeia' ly work--and
backs .. .shows you the tricks that makeplays w os '
fail. Grandstand dopesters.

I

by ELMER pAYDEN

r
" [V1i
::
t
-
,.
-

ON,

IF I GO T WORK
yoURUSBAND?

"You don't care, do you, Lily, my
pet? Mike ,doesn't mean anything t
you any more, does he?" h
nye Lily had fought to put this
long years ye er never
man out of her heart and mind,
mentioning his name because the sound
of it hurt. Mike, Mike,mhdi o
hae to turn up now? ..A modern ro-
of a girl cheated out of love.

'L

4 'fit ..
^.
;.
r . ~
: :, .

0

"I Never MentionYour Name"
by iiTliLYON

:

A New Story by
MARJORIE KINNAN RAWLINGS

i -- -

Eleanor Hazzard Peacock,
M.E.
I n/erna/ionally Rec coatnized
Singer, Teacher, Leclurer
Vocal Studio
"I i gldtoend ore. wr

AND, , , in the same issue MacKinlay Kant brnog
you an emotional short story of the War oH
y so f bobeing evacuated from London, How IPP Y
eof aboy bngeauThDrs Re-
o d . A prohibition article, TheDry
t Cou doth eW ar s yS tanley H igh - --A tim ely radio dis-
turn to the wars, by aletAed aan Picks
ptch from Shanghai from Hallett Abend, Japan pcc
oPLcUSm.hangS serials by Nordhoff and Hall,
on -Uncl Sa... " oemSPost Scripts and
'n.. f_ editorials, poes

Author of "THE YEARLING"

Some women never do learn the best way to hold a man is to
let go-at the right moment. Will Dover's steatopygic wife
sagged the scales at 220-but it was her heavy hand that
got her in trouble! (Plenty of chuckles in this one!) A short story.

S11

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