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September 19, 1939 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGt

Auditions For Band Membership
To Take Place Orientation Week

_I__I

Fall Program
Alpha Nu, Adelphi, Athena,
Zeta Phi Eta And Sigma
Rho Tau Are Available
Speech programs sponsored by the
department of speech and linguistics
and a variety of activities sponsored
by a quintette of extra-curricular or-
ganizations devoted to the cultivation
of eloquence and wit are offering
students opportunity to flount the
ancient poet's warning that "Silence
is Golden."
Organizations specializing in for-,
ensic activities on the campus are
Alpha Nu and Adelphi, both for men
of the literary college; Sigma Rho
Tau for engineers, and Athena and
Zeta Phi Eta for women students.
Honor of being the oldest of the
quintet goes to Alpha Nu, founded
in 1843 when 23 stalwart men com-
prised the student body of the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
On its roster of prominent alumni
are such names as Attorney General
Frank Murphy, Regent Junius Beal,
Prof. Gail E. Densmore of the speech
department, and Prof. Carl G. Brandt,
head of the engineering college Eng-
lish department. Most unique is Adel-
phi which models its meetings after
the sessions of the United States
House of Representatives. Each mem-
ber represents a state in roll call and
debate.
Largest of the speech societies is
Sigma Rho Tau, with an annual mem-
bership close to 90. Establishment of
a closer bond between members of
the technical professions and the
public is the purpose of the society.
Initiates of this group may be
seen during induction ceremonies
haranguing passing throngs in tat-
tered raiment from the historic stump
near the engineering arch.
Speech organizations are among
the few extra-curricular activities
open to first semester freshmen. Ad-
mission is usually granted after a
three to five minute try-out speech
before the active members.
Freshman Group
Previwes Set - Up
150 New Men Attend
Rendezvous Camp
One hundred and fifty healthy
freshmen men were back in Ann
Arbor this morning readying them-
selves for Orientation week after a
three-day preview of the University.
The 150 were chosen at random
from the ranks of entering students
and invited to be guests of the Stu-
dent Religious Association at the
annual Freshman Rendezvous Camp.
The camp is held at the University
Fresh Air camp, which is located on
he shores of Patterson Lake 25 miles
dsatfrom Ann Arbor.
During the three-day program the
Rendezvous men heard talks by
Coach Fritz Crisler, director of ath-
letics, Fielding H. "Hurry-Up" Yost,
and other big-wigs. Swimming,
games, mixer stunts and the learning
of Michigan songs were also high
spots on the program.
Discussion groups talked over such
University activities as athletics,
publications, religious organizations
and dramatics.
Officials say the camp was planned
with a two-fold purpose. It is in-
tended to bring freshmen, faculty and
upper classmen closer together in an
atmosphere of friendly cooperation
and t6 initiate the newcomers into
the adjustments and complexities of
Univelsity life.

With Coach Fritz Crisler's squad
hard at work and the season opener
onlya few daysaway hmuch interest
today centers on the University's
marching band, the famous Fighting
Hundred.
But while the marching band gets
most of the attention, there are also
two other bands-the First Regimen-
tal organization and the concert
band. The three have a combined
membership of over 200 players.
The University bands are conduct-
ed by Prof. William D. Revelli of the
School of Music. Membership in any
of the bands is determined by private
audition with Professor Revelli and
his assistants. Auditions will take
place during Orientation Week from
9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 1 to 5
p.m. every day on the second floor of
Morris Hall, corner of State and
Jefferson Streets.
Band Work Is Credited'
For the first time this year, band
may be elected as a credit course by
students in the College of Literature,
Science and the Arts. Students Tin
the School of Music may elect band
for credit also.
The University Marching Band is
a combination of the Concert and
First Regimental Bands and has a
nembership of 128. It is most active
in the fall during the football season
and plays for all the home games, of
which there are five. The Marching
Band accompanies the football team
on at least one out-of-town trip,
which will be taken to either Chicago
or Illinois this year, with perhaps a
second trip to Penn. Last year
the band played at Yale.
One of the most interesting fea-
tures of the work in the Marching
Band is that of the formations com-
mittee. Any bandsman who is in-
terested or who has an idea for a
particular arrangement is automa-
tically a member of the committee
which meets weekly during the foot-
ball season to consider and discuss
the formations to be used. A tenta-
tive plan for the game under consid-
eration, the product of the commit-
tee's deliberations, is passed on to
the drillmaster and his staff. This
group sets the formation up on a
table-top football field and decides

which of several methods of presen-
tation is the best from the spectator's
#viewpoint. The location of each man
and the method of getting the band
into and out of the formation are
worked out, a stencil is cut and the
formation is mimeographed. A copy
of each formation is given to every
man in the band.
The First Regimental Band plays
for the majority of the basketball
games during the winter, ROTC re-
views in the spring and other such
engagements, starting its activities
after the Marching Band has com-
pleted its football season and has
been dissolved into the other two
bands.
The Concert Band has a member-
ship of approximately 110 pieces and
is active throughout the concert sea-
son. It differs from the Marching
Band in instrumentation, employing
such pieces as alto and bass clarinets,
oboes, flutes, English dhorn and bas-
soons, which are unadaptable to grid-
iron 'performances. In general, the
brasses are decreased and the reeds
are augmented. The Concert Band
is equipped with a comprehensive li-
brary of symphonic literature.
All-Campus Varsity Show
Among the activities in which the
bands participate are the all-campus
varsity show, the annual Christmas
program, the annual Winter Concert
in Hill Auditorium, the reading clinic
of the Michigan School Band As-
sociation, various out of town con-
certs, broadcast series over Detroit
radio station WJR, basketball games,
annual Spring Concert in Hill Au-
ditorium, spring tour, community sing
during commencement week, Alumni
concert and Commencement Exer-
cises.
The University bands own a num-
ber of instruments including bass and
alto clarinets, oboes, English horns,
basses, French horns, baritones,
drums, tympani, and glockenspiels.
These are issued to selected students,
upon order from the conductor, by
the equipment manager. Uniforms
are issued to all members of the Con-
cert and Marching Bands upon pay-
ment of $5 deposit to the University
cashier.

AoCAMPUS CHURCHES

Open House . .

Friday, September 22

Services

Of Worship .

..Sunday, September 24

.. n

THE ANN ARBOR CHURCHES
New students are urged to get in touch with their
churches as soon as they have settled at the University.
The churches listed on this page have planned special
meetings for their students on the first week-end of

ST. MARY'S STUDENTS CHAPEL
William and Thompson
Friday, 8:00 P.M. - Open House in Chapel Audi-
torium.
Sunday Masses - 8:00 and 10:30 A.M.

the school year.
A complete list of the Ann Arbor Churches may,
found in the Freshman Handbook.

be

fl

CHURCH OF CHRIST (DISCIPLES)
Tappan and Hill
Friday, 5:00 P.M. - Picnic Supper.
Meet at the Guild House, 438- Maynard, rain or
shine.
Sunday, 10:45 A.M. - Morning Worship Service.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State andVWilliam
Friday, 8:30 P.M. - Informal party, games and
dancing.
Sunday, 10:45 A.M. - Morning Worship Service.
Sunday, 6:00 - 8:00 P.M. - Reception, Supper and
Program:

.11 . al

HEAD OF THE CLASS

Sunday, 6:30 P.M. - Disciples Guild at the
Introducing the Guild to new students.

Church.

of '43

. . . . . . . . .0

I,

It's a wise teacher who can instruct a class in
Practical living .. . So if you've learned that the
Swellest way to eat - and the most reasonable -
is to come here for your meals, you can be sure
you ve learned life's most enjoyable lesson.
OUR TAP ROOM has a distinct college at-
mosphere - our dining room has excellent facil-
ities for fine dinner parties.
THE FOOD that we serve you is only the best
and the most reasonable prices of any place in
Ann Arbor prevail!

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
Friday, 6:00 P.M. - Steak Roast at the Church.,
Sunday, 10:45 A.M. - Morning Worship Service.
Sunday, 5:30 P.M. - Guild Meeting and Supper at
the church.

FIRST METHODIST EPISCOPAL
C HJRCH
State and Washington
Friday, 6:15 P.M. - Dinner at the Church.
Friday, 8:00 P.M. ---Party

Sunday, 9:45
Hall.

A.M. Class for Students at Stalker

Sunday, 10:40 A.M. - Morning Worship.
Sunday, 6:00 P.M. - Wesleyan Guild Meeting at
the Church. Presentation of the Student Conhcil.
Sunday; 7:00 P.M. - Fellowship Hour and supper.

,

A\ L LE NEL

HOTEL

A

Fll~~--- -~~li

IF YOU

WRITE,

WE HAVE IT!

- A-

ZION AND TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCHES
Trinity Church, East William and Fifth
Zion Church, East Washington and Fifth
Parish Hall, 309 East Washington
Friday, 8:00 P.M. - Open House at the Parish Hall.
Sunday, 10:30 A.M. - Worship Services in Zion and
Trinity Lutheran Churches.
Sunday, 5:30 P.M. - Lutheran Student Association
at Parish Hall. Social Hour.
Sunday, 6:00 P.M. - Supper served by the ladies of
the churches.

":

_rl

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Catherine and Division
Friday, 8:00 P.M. -Informal Open House at Harris
Hall; Episcopal Student Center, State and Huron.
Sunday, 8:00 A.M. - Holy Communion
Sunday, 11:00 A.M. - Morning Prayer and Sermon.
Sunday, 7:00 P.M. - Introducing the Episcopal
Student Center at Michigan, Harris Hall.

Headquarters
for Student and Office Supplies,
Typewriters, and Fountain Pens

New L. C. Smith
and Corona, Roy-
al, Remington,
Underwood noise-
less portable
typewriters in all
models
Reconditioned and Used Office and Portable
Typewriters of all makes bought, sold, rented,
exchanged, cleaned and repaired. SPECIAL
RENTAL RATES to students. Ask about our
easy Rental-Purchase Plan; it will save you
money.
Buy where you may compare all standard
makes in a complete range of prices.

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Nationally Advertised Makes-
WAHL, EVERSHARP,
PARKER, SHEAFFER,
WATERMAN,
and Others
Broken assortments
1 3 to 1/2 Regular Prices
Service Work a Specialty
STUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES
LOOSE LEAF NOTEBOOKS,
CORRESPONDENCE STATIONERY

Sunday, 6:45S
speaker.

P.M. - Association Meeting with

*#

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Friday, 8:00 P.M. - Open House for students at
the Roger Williams Guild House, 503 East Huron.
Sunday, 10:45 A.M. Morning Church Service.

H ILLEL FOUNDATION
ast University and Oakland
Sept. 19-22, 8:00 A.M.-10:00 P.M. - Open House.
Sept. 22, 7:30 P.M. - Yom Kippur Services at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre (Michigan League). Sermon
by Dr. Isaac Rabinowitz.

F

Sept. 23, 10:00 A.M. - Yom Kippur Services at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Sermon by Dr. 'Isaac
n -h-hxit

E iii

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