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September 19, 1939 - Image 33

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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A&XAMIM aww"Mimm"Ir- wrwvm-

'Lit' Students

Take General

Degree Study

To Enter Advanced Work,I
60 Hours .Of Credit; 'C'
Average Are Required
Students in the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts who are
studying for the degree of Bachelor
of Arts or a similar degree, do not
"major" in the subject of their choice,
as is the case in many schools, but
take first a General Program, usually
for two years, followed by a second
or Degree Program, usually requiring
another two years.
To enter the Degree Program, usu-
ally at the beginning of the junior
year, the student must have passed
at least 60 hours of work with an
average of "C" or better. Failure to
attain this minimum scholarship re-
quirement usually makes it necessary
for the student to .withdraw perma-
nently from the College. A further
requirement for admission to concen-
tration is the completion of 6 hours
of English Composition, or its equiv-
alent.
At the conclusion, then, of his
sophomore year, when in the ordin-
ary course of events the student has
earned 60 or more hours of credit
with at least a C average, he becomes
upon filing the necessary application,
a candidate for a degree. At this
time, he must select either a "degree
program" or a "department of con-
centration."
Each student's credit for gradua-
tion, comprising his entire course of
study in all four years in the College,
must include not less than 30 hours
of study in his department of con-
centration, or in such courses of study
as are acceptable to his concentration
adviser.

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Students.

to the tune of

The

Traditional

MichAln-
l(lan

Song
s

s

ai,
j ~~t t®g back to on
to Dear e "Abo
to ilandthle Oney I
h to 01 of the Mpent
to On
obactoArbor ro~i
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gback to. cr allthe
(10
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anothe a lttile fun' elife
nte frf ri~octry o
a f ea
III he lof o

I

Gym Schedule
For Freshmen
Is Announced

l

Announcement of the year's pro-
gram- of compulsory gymnasium
classes for freshmen was made re-
cently by. Dr. George May, director
of Waterman Gymnasium.
All freshmen except those enrolled
In the two-year R.O.T.C. course will
be required to attend the six hygiene
lectures, given during the first three
weeks of the school year, and the
weekly gym classes. However, those
taking part in any athletic squad
work are excused during the time
that these squads are in active prac-
tice. Immediately on the disbanding
of these squads, the student is re-
enrolled in his gym section. The only
athletic squads open to freshmen at
the beginning of the fall term are
football, swimming and track.
Lecture groups on hygiene meet at
the same hours as regular gym section
assignment, that is, at 3, 4 or 5 p.m.
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday of .the first three weeks of
school. A member of the Health
Service staff will be the lecturer. At
the end of the series of lectures, an
examination will be given.
Following the lectures, on Monday
of the fourth week, the regular gym
sections will meet. Each class will
be divided into five parts, each study-
ing one sport, boxing, wrestling,
basketball, track and field or gym-
nastics. The five groups will be ro-
tated every three weeks.
The second semester's work in-
cludes well-known games, tennis,
golf, handball, volleyball, badminton
and others. After spring vacation
freshmen will be permitted to elect
any outdoor sport they wish. In this,
they will be required to attend two
hours per week for the remaining six
weeks, but at any time they choose.

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4

STUDENTS'

LET'S

BRING

our clothes to the

The

Traditional

Michigan

Cleaner

Lecture Series
Is Given Free
Include Scientists, Scholars
And Public Men
Distinguished scientists, scholars
and public men are included on the
program of the University Lectures,
an annual series of about 30 lectures
sponsored by the University.
All lectures are open free to stu-
dents, faculty members and interested
townspeople.
Each lecture is related to the in-
structional program of one of the
departments of the University.
These talks, formerly presented in
Natural Science Auditorium, are now
usually given in the Lecture Hall or
in the Amphitheatre of the Rackham
Building.
Many of these lectures are illus-
trated by motion pictures, slides or
recordings.
Among the interesting men on the
program last year were Roland D.

9
Micro clea n
N UNDER THE MICROSCOPE
Ann Arbor's Foremost Dry Cleaner
rements PROMPT SERVICE on Short Notice

KNITS BLOCKED to measur

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R F PE A U IC G IlIA I h lw11 Abp s n u~l~ t L ' A I ( r TT 1 Z--- D I I II

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