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November 09, 1939 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-11-09

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PAGE EIGUT
Prizes Offered
In Aeronautics
Essay Contest,
Contestants To Write On
Flying's Cultural Value,
E. T. Martin Announces
Robert H. Hinckley, chairman of
the Civil Aeronautics Authority, has
offered $500 for prizes for the winning
entries in an essay contest, on the
subject of "The Cultural Value of
Flying," Edward T. Martin, '41E,
president of the National Intercolle-
giate Flying Club, announced yester-
day.
President Ruthven; Grover Loen-
ing, honorary president of the NIFC;
Maj. R. W. Schroeder, vice-president
in charge of safety of United Airlines,
and Charles F. Horner, president of
the National Aeronautical Associa-
tion, will judge the essays, which
must run in length from 1,000 to 1,-
200 words.
Any person holding a pilot or stu-
dent pilot certificate issued by the
CAA may submit an essay in the com-
petition for the three awards of $300,
$100 and $50, for first, second and
third place, respectively. Essays must
be addressed to the NIFC, in care of
the National Aeronuatic Association,
Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C.
Entries must be in the hands of the
judges by Dec. 1, 1939, and none will
be returned unless return postage is
enclosed.
By June McKee
Though it had to throw off throes
of sleep before its early morning air-
ing, "Collegiate Quiz" must have
sparkled Saturday. Or perhaps it
was "Hanky Panky's" innate perki-
ness. Anyway, since its fifteen min-
utes over WJR, a hundred fan let-
ters have deluged Morris Hall.
So far, seven states and Canada
have requested Hanky Panky lists.
Ministers, collegians, librarians, and
potential lives-of-the-party have
written for hankies to give. Young
and old, humble and haughty, those
concerned with the social success of
clubs in schools and churches, of
metropolis and township-from Oke-
mos to Sugarcreek--have succumbed
to Hanky Pany's spell.
Plans are now afoot for compos-
ing a H.P. song, and ingenious insti-
gators Soenksen, Chown and Silcott,
are even evolving a wall map where-
upon the writing audience will be
virtually thumb-tacked.
More Mail Gleanings .
The incoming Morris Hall mail
brings other tidings, too. Most lately,
that of one more student settled in
broadcasting--Kay Schultz, Grad.
After eigh teen auditions during the
summe.'-rom which little resulted
but discouragement, she found it
"not much fun," forcing herself into
station after station "always to be
told you're good, but they've nothing
for you."
Cae then the long-distance call
that summoned her whizzing to the
services of KMMG, at Grand Island,
Nebr. . . . She describes "Nebraska's
Friendly Station" as typically wes-
tern, even to the "hog and cattle
reports." For the nonce; Kay is help-
ing build up friendly public rela-
tions through work as receptionist,
and continuity writer.
Airing Addenda . . .
Today, in the WJR program of
radio reading and drama at 3:30 p.m.
more will prevail of original plays

and dramatic adaptations of famous
stories and poetry. Catherine Dolch,
Grad., cares for the announcing.
Lamarr Rescued!
Poster Recovered
From Student Fans
"Eestacy" melted into disappoint-
ment yesterday when a life-size re-
production of exotic Hedy Lamarr
Was removed from the living quar-
ter's of two students.
When the glamorous Hedy's last
starring vehicle appeared in Ann Ar-
bor, two students, wending their
weary way homeward from the lo-
cal beer parlors, caught a glimpse of
the attractive advertisement and
were immediately conquered by de-
sire. While the usher was looking
the other way they stole into the
lobby, and, released from all inhibi-
tions, purloined the appealing poster.
All went well for about three weeks,
until their landlady, not apprecia-
tive of "Joe College" pranks and pos-
sessed with a puritanical sense of
duty, telephoned the theatre man-
ager.
When the students arrived home
after a hard day at Angell Hall, their
disillusionment at finding the prized
possession missing was indescribable.
The mystery, however, was solved
by a little note, neatly typewritten
and tacked to the wall where the
sign had been. It proclaimed:
"The sign ways taken out of the
suite by two men who told me they
came from the M----- Theatre and
had been trying to locate it for a

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Chinese War Admiral's Son
Studies At Ann Arbor Ifigh
Peter Hsun Eoyung Says he says-and has taken up boxlrg
} and swimming. One of his hobbies
China's Spirit Against is to acquire aworking knowledge of
Japanese Will Win War American slang, and he grins with
pleasure whenever a slang phrase
By HER"VIE HAUFLERcomes up in the conversation.
Peter Hsun Eoyung, 16 years old, "I am going to make a speech on
did not want to talk about himself. China soon," he said, "when I teach
"Maybe I am the son of the Admiral Sunday School for one day at the
of the Chinese Navy," he said, "but Unitarian Church. I spoke a few
that doesn't matter. I want to talk weeks ago at the Congregational
about China." Church."
He shifted his school books there Both Peter and John or "Butch,"
in the office of Ann Arbor High are very serious about the business
School and leaned forward intently. of preparing for a career. Peter,
"Some people have said China will be by carrying extra work, expects to
slave to Russia," he said. "I want complete high school in two years and
to say this is not true. China loves enter the University to study naval
peace, independence and liberty and architecture and engineering. Later
we are fighting for our independence he hopes to enter a British naval
just as America once fought for academy. Mary plans to study in
hers." Italy after completing her work here.
A typical American high school stu- "Yes, I was born in Shanghai," he
dent passed and yelled, "Hiya, Pete." admitted, "and I've studied in Lon-
Pete waved abstractedly and con- don and ten years in Nanking and
tinued, "China will win the war. Just I've had a year of miiltary training.
as Confucius believed, we have a But I don't matter.
material and a spirit philosophy. Our
material program is to work for aid.Ex
And the spirit of the people, especial- Labor xpert
ly the young is-how you say it?
-very 'hot' against the Japanese.
We will win the war." To eak ere
These are the thoughts of young
Peter as he studies to equip himself Seidman To Discuss Peace
for the time when trained technical
experts will be needed to rebuild At Noonday Luncheon
China. Here in Ann Arbor with him
are his sister Mary, 15 years old, Dr. Joel Seidman, field secretary
studying in University High, and his and special lecturer for the League
brother John,9, known as "Butch" to for Industrial Democracy, will dis-
the students of Angell School. cuss "Prospects for Peace" at 12:15
Peter has not heard from his father p.m. today at a luncheon in the
who is commander of the now de- Union sponsored by the Liberal Action
funct Chinese Navy and one of the Club.
advisers on the war councils of Gen- Dr. Seidman has had long experi-
eralissimo Chiang Kai-Shek, for ence with social and labor problems,
many weeks. having served as a member of the
Meanwhile Peter finds a lot to at- research staff of Editorial Research
tract his attention in American stu- Reports in Washington, D.C., as
dent life. He has become interested well as holding the post of instructor
in football-"I root for the team," in trade unionism at the Brookwood

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THROUGH
LOOKING
The F
Presented

THE
G LA SS
Show
by

Club To Hear Speaker
The possibilities in the motor trans-
port field from an employment view-
point will be the subject of a talk by
Mr. Samuel Houston of the Interna-
tional Truck Co at 7:30 p.m. today
in Room 1213 East Engineering Build-
ing of the Transportation Club.
HENSIAN PlC

Must be taken b)
Dec. 2nd. Seniors
hove your sitti n
before the Holida
Rush begins . . .

Labor College. He was also director
of the college for some time.
During the last eight years he has
contributed to economic journals and
is the author of "The Elements of
Trade Unionism," "Introduction to
Labor Problems" and other books
dealing with labor problems.
Dr. Seidman's talk is one of a
series of lectures planned by the Lib-
eral Action Club.
wT UaRES 540
MISDial 53541

Ann Arbor

stores

are ready to

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

present to a waiting audience of

Michigan women

a preview

of

the outstanding styles for the

year

1940- in

a fashion show,

319 East Huron, opp. Daily Ne

entitled "Through the, Looking

Glass."

nAnnouncement..
FOLLET T'S
hove installed o
GOL D STAMPING'
MCH INE -
an Added Service for
FOLLETT customers.
IT IMPRINTS: NAMES.. INITIALS. . MONOGRAMS
in colors or in 22 karat gold.. . on .

C7'Lusic

by

4

BILE GAIL and his orchestra

Lea gue

flallroom

PEN, PENCILS, STATIONERY,

and LEATHER GOODS

60 Sheets Imprinted
50 Envelopes
PERSONALIZED
STATIONERY
Only
$1.00Af

60 Sheets Imprinted
50 Envelopes
FRATERNITY
and SORORITY
Greek Alphabet
STATIONERY
Only

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER'. 10th
3:15 to 5:o30

11 sO% w wnt

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