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November 07, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Vast Transportation Advances
Foreseen By Conference here

Six-Lane Super-Highways
To Span North Aerica,
Says Michigan-Life Unit

9
1
F .#+
i

ned the prerequisites to a more ef- New York to San Francisco in eight
ective religious program for students hours by air: across the country ont
n the Michigan campus at a meeting six-lane, separated super-highways by,
f national student secretaries here cars travelling better than 100 miles
ast Saturday and Sunday. per hour.
At the Protestant student rally Sun- No Jules Verne dreams, such ex-I
[.y, Dr. Gould Wickey, General Sec- periences may become common oc-
etary, Council of Church Boards of curances in a year or two, possiblyi
Education, summarized the findings within a few months, according to
f the conference, and spoke on the foremost transportatipn technicians
opic, "Living With Others." who exchanged data and experiences;
The panel session on the Study of at the Michigan-Life transportation
;hristian faith concluded that the conferences here this week.
arious guilds on campus were failing Already tested and ready for pro-
o make their members better Chris- duction are multi-engine airliners de-
ians while at college, and decided signed to carry 40 passengers across
hat the method of presentation, rath- the country in three 1,000-mile jumps
r than the subject matter, was at through the rarified medium of the
ault. Leadership and more careful stratosphere. Hermetically sealed and
ong-range planning were seen as the electrically heated things of the past.
jest solutions of the problem. Superhighways PlannedI
Discussing "Social Action," another Phenomenal advances in highway
panel, resolved that every campus construction and fuels appear to fore-
;uild must take a stand on the cur- tell the future of automobile trans-
ent war situation, and must carry portation. Cross-county super-high-
ut its plan. ways with separated crossings and
divided lanes are not far from realiza-
ro Show 'American Wmay' tion.
High-test 100 octane gasolines have
"The American Way, a motion pic- been employed in ariplanes for some
ure, will be shown at a meeting of the time, and the adaptation of automo-
Washtenaw County Chapter of the biles to take advantage of the power
gational Aeronautic Association 2.t 8 increase and improved performance
.m. today in the Union. The general derived from these fuels is now on the,
>ublic is invited to attend. threshold of possibility. ;
To those less inclined to travel, tele-
vision will offer a comprehensive in-
sight into the important scenes and
events in the world as they happen.
AL BULLETSN That television is practical has been
demonstrated by the successes of sta-
tions now in operation. One major
hurdle remains to be taken: the trans-
ce of the University since Nov. 17, mission of television to points further
1915, may purchase an Annuity fromthan 50 miles from the transmitter.
h915 ma yn a e A nnuiationtoward Feat Not Impossible
he above-named Association, tward It iN not an impossible feat; en-
he cost of which the Regents would gineers already have several schemes
make an equal contribution up to in mind. One solution may be the
five per cent of his annual salary use of the new co-axial type cable,
ot in excess of $5,000, thus, within or possibly the use of high-fidelity
he limit of five per cent of the salary, relays cabins kept at ground level
>oubling the amount of the Annuity pressure will closely simulate condi-
purchased. tions in a comfortable living room,
3. The purchase of an Annuity 'whilespecially super-charged en-
mder the conditions mentioned n gines with variable pitchapropellers
(2) above is made a condition of em- take massive bites into the frigid, ran-
>loymrent in the case of all members fied atmosphere.
>f the Faculties, except instructors, High above terrestial storms and
whose term of Faculty service does clouds, these skyliners will take ad-
not antedate the University year vantage of layers of prevailing east-
1919-1920. With instructors of less west winds.
han three years' standing the pur- Railrods Push Ahead
chase of an Annuity is optional. Nor Will future travel be limited to
4. Persons who have become mem- airplanes. Not to be outdone by its
>ers of the faculties since Nov. 17, precocious challenger, railroads have
1915 and previous to the year 1919- pushed research facilities to the ut-
1920 have'the option of purchasing most in supplying a safe, fast and
nuities under the tniversity'scon comfortable means of transportation.
trnuitoresplun h i t c Among the latest developments is a
5. And person in the employ of the floating" railway passenger coach,
(Continued on Page 4) known as the Hill car. With three
Classified Directory

units already in production on the
West Coast, this latest innovation by
the railroads promises to set an en-
tirely new standard of comfort in rail
communication.
By supporting the four corners of
the car on tall coil springs, the fa-
miliar, nerve-wracking periodic clank
of wheel trucks over evenly-spaced
rail joints will become a thing of the
past.
Whatever the solution, one will be
found. We are still nowhere near tech-
nical perfection, Charles Kettering
challenged last week, there is much
yet in store for us; it is the falacy of
every generation to believe it has
reached the peak in perfection.
GIhb Is Questioned
On Relief Reports

(Continued from Page 1) ,

swering directly to Prosecutor Rapp's
questions, Gibb revealed that he had1
never given receipts to the townships
for their relief checks, believing that
the cancelled checks were sufficient
receipt. B-ut when Rapp referred to
the cancelled checks totalling the $5,-
547.52 that Gibb is charged with em-
bezzling, the former county clerk was
unable to say what happdened to the
money on those checks.
"Probably it's still in the county
funds," he said. "I don't know."
To several other questions by Rapp,
he resorted to "I don't know" or "I
can't account for that" as his only
answer. When Rapp pointed out dis-
crepancies between the amount on the
relief checks turned over to him and
the amount he had forwarded to the
county treasurer, Gibb was unable to
account for the difference.
In one instance, he stated that he
had turned all the money over;, on
another, that "he must have made a
refund to the township, and on still
another, "I can't tell you and I can't
explain it."
At the morning session, Attorney
Conlin finished his questioning of
Gibb, pointing out that (,here was
$5,283.25 in fees due the former clerk
from the county. Gibb testified that
he had filed the claim after he had
resigned, and that he was making
it again, because "when you've got
your back against a wall, you're going
to fight."

Parent Group
Opens Annual
Session Today
Conference Will Consider
Community Problems;
Jay Allen Will Lecture
(Continued from Page 1)
Parents and Teachers, will preside.
Clark E. Higbee, judge of Probate,
Juvenile Court, will speak at the
luncheon on "Limitation on Commun-
ity Control."
The afternoon- session at 2 p.m.
in the Lecture Hall of the Rackham
Building will feature an address en-
titled "The Coming Michigan Youth
Survey" by Clark Tibbets, lecturer
in sociology and director of the In-
stitute of Human Adjustment at the
University.
Conferences will follow his address
at 2:30 p.m. They will -consider:
"Personal Adjustment and Character
Training;" "This Side of the Court;"
"Guidance Problems in High School;"
"A Michgan Experiment with aBoy's
Club;" and "Vocation Problems of
Youth."
T'hursday's Session
The Thursday session will consider
"The Community - Its Enduring
Values." Dean W. W. Whiteh;iouse of
Wayne University and pr. Earnest
Chave of ,the Chicago Divinity
School will be the featured speakers
in the morning session.
A panel, entitled "How May We
Effectively Share in Youth's Search
for Values" will take up the after-
noon.
The evening session will consist of
a dinner discussion by student par-
ticipants on the question "The Com-
munity Youth Would Pke to See."
Jay Alien Featured
Jay Allen, war correspondent and
roving reporter for the Chicago Tri-
bune and London News Chronicle,
will highlight the Friday session
which will consider "The Commun-
ity-Its Search for Facts." He will
speak at 2 p.m. in the Lecture Hall
on "Propaganda in the News aid How
to Spot It." He will lead the forum
"When Instructed-When Propagan-
dized" immediately following.
The morning session Friday in-
cludes an address by BarcIay Ache-
son, associate editor of the Hleader's
Digest, on 'Fr'eedom, the Mental
Climate for Progress."
The Institute will then adjourn at
4:30 p.m.

We carry a complete line of
ARROW SHIlRTS and TIES
The Foremost Clothiers in Washtenaw County
DOWNTOWN - Next to the Wuerth Theatre

Why Gordon was Elected
1,499,673 to 8

I'd

/7
//
fir,
: :.

LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Soxdarned.
Careful work at low prices. 16
ACE HAND LAUNDRY-Wants only
one trial to prove we launder our
shirts best. Let our work help you
look neat today. 1114 S. Univer-
sity. 19
BUDGET BUNDLE
6 lb s. 97c
12c each additional pound
Everything Everything
Included Finished'
SUNSHINE LAUNDRY
Formerly Sam's Home Laundry
Dial 6964
Free Pick Up and Delivery 42
EMPLOYMENT - 13
3 YOUNG MEN, age 18 to 21, college
men preferred, free totravel to
Florida, Texas, and California and
return. Transportation furnished,
drawing account $75. Mr. Burton,
at Allenel, 10:30 to 1:00. Apply in
person only.
MISCELLANEOUS- 20
SPECIAL-$5.50 Machineless Per-
manent $2.50; $3 oil cocona $1.50;
end permanent $1. Shampoo and
fingerwave 35c. Phone 8100, 117
Main. 36
NOTICE-The fraternity which bor-
rowed the cross-cut saw from Sid
Hammil during freshman week
please return. 'Call 5174. 63
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13

In every campus poll
the Arrow Gordon wins
in-a walk. Six reasons why:
1'. Its basketweave, fabric is sturdy and a
bear for long wear. In white, colors,,
patterns.

and fancy

2. Its Arrow collar is packed with tailoring perfection
and authentically styled for college men.
3. Being Sanforized-Shrunk (its fabric shrinkage is
less than [%). A new shirt free if one ever shrinks.
4. The Mitoga cut is
- shaped to fit the torso
(broad shoulders - nar-
row waist).
5. Its anchored buttons-
take a 40 lb. pull.
6. Its birthright is Arrow-
and that means in sim-
ple language, smarter
style, better' fit, and
longer wear.
Join the Arrow landslide for as little as $2.

I0, ARROJI7SHJiTs
COLLARS ... TIES ... HANDKERCHIEFS . . . UNDERWEAR
1- -

ARROW Gordon
famous whereve A R R 7 shirts are nnwn.

I

11

7

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