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November 02, 1939 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MITCHIGAN DAILY

Transportation
Advances Are
Stressed Here
Conference Will Continue
Today With Symposium,
Speakers And Luncheon
(Continued from Page 1)
special Samples of Science program
presenting short discussions by six
University scientists in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre last night.
The structure and function of the
University's 100 ton cyclotron were
presented in the opening talk by Prof.
H. R. Crane of the physics depart-
ment. Professor Crane pointed par-'
ticularly to its use as a tool to pry
the inner mysteries of nuclear physics
and in producing artificially radio-
active substances.
Prof. Ralph A. Sawyer, of the phys-
ics department continued with a dis-
cussion of the work accomplished by
himself and Prof. H. B. Vincent in
the development of high speed meth-
ods of quantitative spectral analysis
of iron and steel.
Prof. Ernest F. Barker of the
physics department then outlined the
research carried out here in the field
of infra-red spectroscopy. Especially
helpful in this work are the diffrac-
tion gratings produced by the ruling
machine developed here.
Turning to the field of astronomy,
Prof. Robley C. Williams of the
astronomybdepartment described his
method of applying aluminum coat-
ing to mirrors. This process, which
is carried out under a vacuum, re-
cently won Professor Williams the
Lonstreth Medal of the Franklin In-
stitute.
In a speech illustrated by slides,
Prof. Jesse Ormondroyd of the en-
gineering mechanics department de-
scribed the 200-inch Mt. Palomar tele-
scope for which he had charge of de-
signing for the mounting.
Prof. Robert R. McMath, director
of the University's McMath-Hulbert
Observatory on Lake Angelus, con-
cluded the series with a discussion
and motion pictures of the storms
and other phenomena on the sun's
surface as studied at the Lake Ange-
lus observatory. Shown in the
astronomical movies were solar cy-
clones, whirling masses of atomic gas
as high as 150 thousand miles above
the sun's surface.

Premier Mussolini Shifts His Cabinet

Debate Coach
CallsMeeting
ornan Varsity Debaters1
Will OrganizeTuesday
Women varsity debaters will organize
at a meeting called for 7 p.m. next:
Tuesday in Room 3209 A.H. by Mrs. i
Frederic O. Crandall, women's de-
bate coach.
The first activity for the debaters
this year will be a round-table dis-
I cussion Dec. 8 and 9 at Ohio State
similar to the one held at Northwes-
tern last year. Four women will be
chosen from the tryouts to work on
the topic "Should Anti-democratic
SOrganizationsbe suppressed in the
United States?"
After the two-day discussion, the
participants from the Big Ten schools
will present their conclusions on the
topic in a radio broadcast.
Last year Betty Jane Mansfield,
'39, Mary Frances Reek, '40, Mary
Virginia Bush, '41BAd, and Janet
Grace, '42, traveled to Evanston for
the first discussion group ever held.
on the question, "Resolved: That
Married Women Whose Husbands
Are Gainfully Employed Should Not
Work For Compensation."

Enrollment Rise Seen
In Literary College
Alnost two ioiusand students are
1OW registered in the college of Lier-
aue,, Science and the Arts, an in-
'I'ease of more than a hundred over
last year's total, according to a bulle-
tin issued by the Registrar's Office.
This year for the first time Prof.
Charles M. Davis, Director of Admis-
sions with Advanced Standing, has
included in the total students admit-
ted to concentration with less than
sixty hours credit. Also included are
sixty-six students admitted in this
manner by Prof. Arthur Van Duren,
Jr., Chairman of Academic Counsel-
ors.
Most students are concentrating in
the field of Economics
Catholic Students Issue
First 'Chapel Chronicle'
The first number for this year of
The Chapel Chronicle published by
Catholic students, was issued this
week. Besides news of coming events
in the Newman Club, it contains a
brief selection from John Henry Car-
dinal Newman's 'Idea of a University'
and a discussion by John Murphy of
3cholastic philosophy which is the
philosophical basis of Catholicism.

CAA Flight Training
To Begin Nov. 10,
Delayed by legal snares in the gov-
ernment contracts to assisting air-
ports, the Civil Aeronautics Author-
ity flight training program will not
begin until Nov. 10.
Ground school for the 50 students
who qualified for the training has
already begun, but actual flying will
be postponed until the government
approves the contract with the Ann
Arbor Airport.
Once started, the flight training
will be speeded up to permit the coin-
)letion of the course in June, 1940.
C AA rules have been changed to al-
low for six in.tead of three 30-minute
training periods per week.
Foresters Hear Bartlett
Prof. H. H. Bartlett of the Botany
department spoke on "A Trip
Through Formosa" at the second
meeting of the Forestry Club held ai
7:30 p.m. yesterday in room 2054 N.S.
He related his experiences as the first
white man to cross the Island of For-
mosa. On his trip he was accom-
panied by a military escort.

Prosecution Rests
In E.M. Gibb Trial
(Continued fromr Pagei
menting his testimony Irving ReiMer,
accountant for the Ann Arbor Sav-
ings and Commercial Bank. Ralph
Savage, Edward Zahn, George Camp
and Benona E.' Pryer, tellers from
the same bank, identified the deposit
slips from which Gibb had deducted
cash, and thus failed to turn over the
full amount.
Prosecutor Rapp declared after the
trial that this testimony was a com-
plete refutation of Gibb's explanation
that two checks totallnig $5,724.01
from Ypsilanti City and Ypsilanti
Township had been stolen. Gibb
made his statement last April when
the shortage in relief funds was first
discovered.

A sudden re-organization of the Fascist regime by Premier Mussolini
gave Marshal Rodolfo Graziani (left) the position of chief of the
Italian Army general staff. Lieut.-General Achille Starace (right) was
shifted from, the secretaryship of the Fascist party to chief of the
general staff of the Fascist militia. Several of the minitsers involved
were credited with pro-German sympathies.

Business
as usual during
alterations
GACH CAMERA SHOP

,

°111

Television Set To Be Displayed
Tomorrow At Hill Auditorium

ENSIAN

By KARL KESSLER
Four tons of delicate scientific
equipment which arrived here yes-
terday heralded the Ann Arbor pre-
view of modern television.
Consigned to the special public
denonstration to be given at 8:15
'p.m. tomorrow in' Hill Auditorium,
the tangle of tubes, cameras and re-
ceivers is being uncrated and set up
in Hill Auditorium under the super-
'vision of Harold J. Markley and Wal-
ter L. Lawrence, service engineers
from the R.C.A. television labora-
tories.
Extremely essential in the success-
ful transmission of television is the
full illumination of "the subject. For
this purpose, batteries of floodlights
of the type used in the making of
motion pictures are being set up in
Hill Auditorium. Under the intense
illumination provided by these flood-
lights, the iconoscope -or picture-
camera is able to pick out the details

of the image and transmit the picture
to the receiving sets.
Since television utilizes an ex-
tremely wide band of broadcast fre-
quencies, about four times as wide as
the whole broadcast band, the light-
carrying electric impulses cannot be
effectively transmitted over ordinary
wire. For this purpose, special coax-
ial-type cables have been shipped
here to carry the image impulses
between camera, syncronizing unit
and receivers.
The electric "eye" of the camera
is a ladle-shaped glass tube about
two feet long. Within this tube is,
a flat screen about four by six inches
in size on which, the sensitizing ele-
ments are impregnated. It is on this
senstive screen that the light image
focused there by the camera is con-
verted into electrical impulses. These
impulses aire then amplified and
transmitted to the receivers.

PICTURES

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111111

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Stationers, Printers, Binders, Office Outfitters
112 South Main Street Phone 4515

Studio: 319 EAST-HURON
Opposite The Daily News

Dial 5541
Established 1890

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