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October 26, 1939 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICTIGAN DAILY

Changes Shown
In Catalogues
Of 1843, 1939
Collection At Rackham
Building Features Old
Arts, Sciences Booklet
The difference between the six-
page catalogue of the Department of
Arts and Sciences of the University
of Michigan in 1843 and the 300-page
announcement of the College of Lit-
erature, Science and the Arts of 1939
is more than one of size, as an exam-
ination of the catalogues in the
Michigan Historical Collections at
the Rackham Building will show.
The six-member faculty taught
courses in Chemistry, Minerology,
Geology, ' Philosophy, Mathematics,
Greek, Latin, Zoology and Botany, in
addition to directing its charges mor-
ally by enforcing the University regu-
lation decreeing:
Must Attend Public Worship
"Every student is required to attend
Public Worship on the Sabbath, at
such one of the Churches in the Vil-
lage of Ann Arbor as his parent or
guardian may direct."
The admission requirements in-
cluded no complicated filling out of
blanks or health examinations. Stu-
dents needed only a sufficient train-
ing in grammar, geography, arithme-
tic, Virgil, Cicero, Andrews and Stod-
dard's Latin Grammar and Sopho-
cles' Greek Grammar. The appli-
cant's character and good intentions
had to be vouchsafed by a responsible
person.
Carefully Calculated Estimates
Since fees and expenses were the
most important items then as they
are now, the catalogue listed care-
fully calculated estimates. The ad-
mission fee was $10 (no mention was
made of football coupon books) and
other expenses were judged to aver-
age between $70 and $100 per year
with the addition of "$7.50 a year for
incidental expenses and the services
of the Janitor." No charge was made
for tuition.
Although the student adviser sys-
tem had not yet been devised, there
was no difficulty in choosing sub-
ects, for the entire four year course
of a1l students was planned uniform-
ly.
Listed with their names and home
towns, the enrollees of 1842-43 in-
cluded 11 juniors, 19 sophomores, 23
freshmen, and 17 preparatory stu-
dents, a grand total of 70.
GREATER VALUES!
FALL
Tailored by Michaels-Stern
Priced and up
Other fine makes
Priced $2.50 up
TO POATS
from $2350 up
Don't delay. Buy now before
prices rise.

Genuine Pigskin Gloves ..$2.50 up
New Jayson Shirts...........$2.00
Wool and Leather Jackets ....$6.50
Bradley Sweaters........... $2.00 up
Holeproof Hose.........35c to $1.00
DSTINCTIVE . AAN$ k A
116 EAST LIBERTY

'City Of Flint' Transported To Russian Port By Germans

Russians Are Obliged To Release
'City Of Flint,' Preuss Declares

The American government owned freighter "City of Flint," shown here as she reached Halifax Sept. 13
with Athenia survivors, was reported riding at harbor at Murmansk, Russia, a prize of the German cruiser
Emden. The Germans -accused the freighter of carrying contraband.
v ividNSto Related Of Atdnic Storm
Th at Tossed Liner, 'President Harding'

By HERVIE HAUFLER

L

A passenger's view of what old"
salts call the worst storm to hit the
North. Atlantic in 50 years is being
told here by Mrs. William E. Under-
down, of Barton Hills, who was
aboard the liner President Harding
last week when it limped through the
storm en route from England.
Mrs. Underdown left New York
Aug. 17 on a tour of Europe ,with
Prof. and Mrs. Louis C. Karpinski.
Mrs. Karpinski was injured during
the storm.
Mrs. Underdown was on the star-
board deck when a mountainous wave,
herald of the storm, rolled over the.
ship. She relates that the captain
afterwards stated that he was on the
bridge of the vessel, fully 70 feet:
above the surface of the water, and
that he had to look up to see the
crest of the wave.
Like Sudden Auto-Crash
"The impact of the wave was some-
thing like a sudden auto-crash," Mrs.
Underdown observed. "I was thrown
out of my chair onto the railing. The
deck pitched to about a 45-degree
angle, and we could do nothing until
the ship had levelled off somewhat."
It was during this first impact, she
believed, that the young cabin-wait-
er, Paul Johnson, was washed over-
board. -On the starboard deck where
Mrs. Underdown was, a priest took
command and quieted the frightened
passengers.
In describing the impact of the
wave later, officers of the liner, ac-
cording to Mrs. Underdown, stated
that it seemed certain for a moment
Grad OutingClub,
To Elect Officers
Election of officers for the Gradu-
ate Outing Club will take place at
2:30 p.m., Oct. 29, at the Graduate
Outing Club Room in the Rackham
building, Abraham Rosenzweig, mem-
ber of the temporary executive com-
mittee, announced yesterday.
Following the business meeting, the
club will drive to Portage Lake, and
hike up Peach Mountain. Any grad-
uate students are invited to come,
said Rosenzweig.
Last Saturday there was an over-
night hike to Camp Takoma at Clear
Lake. Twenty-seven members par-
ticipated in the outing chaperoned
by Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wallace of
Ann Arbor.
Club Smoker Postponed
The smoker, planned for Friday
night at the Union by the Chicago
Club, will be postponed until the
night before the Minnesota game,
Friday, Nov. 10, Ralph J. Kelly, '41E,
president, announced yesterday.

i

that the ship would turn over and
roll down the steep slope of the[
wave. The captain ordered the of-
ficers on the bridge to lash him to
the pilot's wheel.
Order Passengers Inside
Other officers ordered the passen-
gers inside-it did not mattei where,
whether into staterooms or tourist-
class cabins. In the larger rooms
the furniture broke loose and crashed
into the walls with every sway of the
boat, until it sounded as though tne
entire ship were breaking up.
In their quarters, Mrs. Underdown
related, the passengers sat on the
floor and tried to hold on to keep
from slipping from one wall to the
opposite with each pitch of the liner.
One man, with scientific thorough-
ness, determined the angle of pitch
of the vessel by watching the fluid
in a thermos jug.
Mrs. Underdown lauded the spirit
of the crew, narrating how officers
went from cabin to cabin to inform
the passengers that the President
Harding was holding up and that
there was no grave cause for alarm.
The ship's cooks prepared breakfast
as usual, despite the fact that one
cook, in trying to make coffee, was
scalded.
Shortly after embarking, Mrs. Un-

derdown said, the liner received an
SOS call from a sinking freighter.
On the way to the stricken vessel,
however, the President Harding was
stopped by a German submarine,
which signalled the location of two
boatloads of English sailors, victims
of another sinking.
35 Sailors Rescued
The liner rescued the 35 sailors
and continued on toward the scenef
of the first disaster. On arrival
there, however, the President Harding
found only the fiercely burning hulk
of the freighter. 'Two British de-
stroyers arrived soon after and could
find no trace of the crew. Wishing
to hunt out the submarines in the
vicinity, the British officers asked
Capt. James R. Roberts, master of the
President Harding, for information
of any subs he had seen. But the
Captain, abiding by the Neutrality
Law, Mrs. Underdown explained, re-
fused to tell of the liner's encounter
with the German craft.
Gibb Accounts
Checked Again
County Treasurer Reveals
$5,547.52_Shortage
By WINSTON H. COX
For the second time during the
trial of Emmett M. Gibb, former
county clerk, who is up on an em-
bezzlement charge of $5,547:52, Prose-
cutor Albert J. Rapp showed that
Gibb's records in the welfare fund
between January 1936 to April 1939
had a shortage of $5,547.52.
Charles E. Crittendon, county
treasurer, was on the stand most of
the day testifying that the county
treasury's records which were checked
separately from the county clerk's
records as given by J. Martin Renipp,
accountant in the county clerk's of-
fice, tallied with the one's given by
Rempp and Rapp and that all three
showed a shortage of $5,547.52.
Rempp was the only other witness
yesterday. He was called back to
answer questions pertaining to Crit-
tendon's testimony. Rapp said that
J. D. Whitman, State auditor, will be
on the stand Friday to give evidence
on the audit he made in the investi-
gation last spring. Whitman is fr6rn
the Auditor General's office in Lan-
sing.

or
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f
I

Student Sues
For $25,000

.!

1

Reiss,
Hurt

University Golfer,
In Auto Accident

f

Lynn C. Reiss, jr., a member of the
University golf team, has filed a
$25,000 damage suit in Washtenaw
County circuit court as the result of
an accident a year ago in which he
suffered serious injuries, it was re-
vealed yesterday.
Reiss, who is not attending the
University this semester but plans to
reenroll in February, is seeking that
amount of money from H. B. Stow-
man & Sons, Van Buren county, and
Robert Thomas, also of Van Buren.
Represented by 'John B. Kirk law
firm of Ypsilanti, Reiss charges in a
warrant which was filed in court
Tuesday that injuries inflicted on him
in a truck-automobile accident Oct.
15, 1938, have caused him "great
suffering and pain" and will give him
"pain and inconvenience in the fu-
ture."

VI

hr if

'Pormalc&ear
FULL DRESS SUITS
$35.00
TUXEDOES $24.50
VESTS .$4.50
SHIRTS $2.50
TIES 65c - $1.00,
HOSIERY 50c - 75c
STUDS and LINKS

Ali

- ,'
/ j i
-~

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CONTIIV1PO

11

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