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October 08, 1939 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-10-08

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THE MICHIGAN -DAILY

Yankees

Take

Third Straight Series Game

New York Hits
Four Homers
Off Thompson
Keller Leads Powerhouse
With Two Circuit Clouts;
Victory Goes To Hadley
CROSLEY FIELD, Cincinnati, Oct.
7.-( P)-The New York Yankees' pow-
erhouse, after travelling in low gear
before masterful pitching for two
days, broke loose its home run light-
wing today to smash the Cincinnati
Reds, 7 to 3, for the third straight
victory in the 1939 World Faries.
With tne pitching giving way to
the attack on both sides for the first
time in this series, the bombing
squad from the Bronx blasted four
home runs-two by Rookie Charley
Keller-and gave a strongly partisan
crowd of 32,723 home-club rooters a
display of the dynamite which has
made it famous in its last three
straight world championship tri-
umphs
Yanks Get Five Hits
In near mid-summer weather that
had every one of the jam-packed
stands a mass of shirt-sleeves, the
Yankees made only five hits to ten for
the National League kings-but they
didn't waste a one, as Rookie Junior
Thompson served his "boom boom"l
ball to them in just the right spots
in the first five innings.
Keller clouted his first four-bag-
,ger after Frankie Crosetti had
walked in the' opening inning. ThEn
clouting Charley drew a pass with
two out in the third, and Joe Di
Maggio snapped out of his series hit-
ting doldrums with a towering smash
that soared high over the 383-foot
mark on the center-field fence and
into the street beyond.
Rolfe Singles
Red Rolfe singled with one away
in the fifth, and was promptly
brought around by Keller's sec6nd
four-bagger, a hard-hit drive that
landed about 10 rows back in the
right field bleachers. DiMaggio only
managed an infield fly in this frame,
but catcher Bill Dickey, up right be-
hind him, crashed a homer deep into
the bleachers, some 37 feet away.
That was the end of¢ Junior, the
22-year-old right-hander, who didn't
have anything even closely resemb-
ling the stuff shown by his pitching
mates, Paul Derringer and Bucky
Walters, who lost the first two games
in New York, despite heroic hurling.
That, too, was the end of the
Yankees' assault, for Lefty Lee Gris-
som and Young Lloyd (Whitey)
Moore handcuffed them completely
all the way through the last four
innings. Not a Yankee reached base
in that time, and only three of them
managed to hit balls out of the in-
field.
Three In A Row

IN THIS CORNER

College Grid Scores
EAST

~By MIEL Fl/VELWR

I

New Difficulties. ..
Games cometh and games goeth
but a coach's troubles abideth forever.
The State game yesterday indicated
that reserve line troubles are almost a
thing of the past. Reuben Kelto
Bill Melzow, Bob Ingalls and Joe Rog-
ers played a lot of football. For this
the coaches are thankful. But now
the staff' starts worrying about the
second 'team backfield. On offense
they were 'distinctly 'uncolossal. Dave
Strong, after two brilliant weeks in
practice, had a bad case of fumble-
itis. Dave Nelson showed a lot of
stuff, Walt IKitti blocked nicely but
as atbackfield they didn't function
smoothly
Fred Trosko's return will be great-
ly appreciated by all concerned.
The Wolverines were a badly
bruised lot after the game. John
Nicholson, who was carried off
the field on a stretcher after col-
liding with Bill Kennedy of State,
was limping with a groin injury.'
A hurried examination revealed
tha nothing serious would re-
suit although he was taken 'to
the hospital for a more thorough
exam and will stay there over-
night.
Paul Kromer and Forest Evashev-
ski playdd through the entire game
with injuries about which the coaches
knew nothing. On the first punt tht
Kromer caught he injured his'knee.
"I couldn't rin at more than half
speed for the rest of the game," he
said. When asked if he'd be' out of
any games, Kromer replied, "Hell no.
I don't practice four weeks to sit on
the bench the rest of my life." It is
feared, however, that a ligament may
be torn in his knee and x-rays will be
taken today.'
Evie was hurt on the first kick-off.
"I couldn't breath when' I stood up
straight," said Eie, wihb; inicidentally,
was the last man out of the dressing
room after the game. The One-Man-
Gang didn't appear to be injured on
the field. He was all over the place
on defense; he made three successive
tackles, two of which were on the
othei 'side of the line. And besides, he1
caught passes for two touchdowns.
Aside to Forest Evashevski: Is
there any truth to this story? Did
you know Michigan scored that
second touchdown 'hen Hfarmon
went off tackle? One official said
there was no touchdown and asa
result did you call a rushing play
to "try to score? 'How surprised
were you when you found the rest
of the team go back for the next
kick-off? Please let us know.
We wait on your answer,
Eli ScoutingCorps.. .
Seated in the Press Box as Yale
scouts were Clint Frank, all-Ameri-
can back from Yale two years ago and
Jerry Ford, one of Michigan's great
centers Frank, who hasn't been in
New Haven for six months, said he
"had no idea how Yale is this year."
But he did have definite ideas about
Michigan. "It's a better team than
they had last year-and what an of-
fense!" When asked what he thought
of Harmon, he responded, "what do
we all think of Harmon. He's great!"
Ford had more to say about the
Michigan offense and Evashevski.
He too thought it was a better
team than last year and thought
that the signal calling of Evie
in the first half was one of the

best he'd ever seen. (So did
Fi'hk)'""Yale;" he said, "will ba
about the same as last year. We'll
have a good line and a poor back-
field. We miss Dick Humphreys
who did 'so well against Michigan
last year and Anderson who is in-
eligible. He" was our whole of-
fense. You play HarvArd next
year, don't you? Well, they're
going to be tough then. They
came up with a great freshman
team last year and now have
seven sophomores playing with
them."
Both of them went a little haywire
when the half time score of the Yale-
Columbia game was announced yes-
terday. And both were 'pointing
fingers when State completed that
;ouchdown pass over Harmon's head.
You can look for a lot of teams
preaching "get behind Harmon on
passes.
Incidentally, that touchdown
pass 'might 'not have been Har-
mon's fault. He took the first man
that came into his territory but
Davis, the second man, broke fast
and took it past the Gary Ace'.
Charley Bachman, State mentor
had nothing but praise for Michigan,
"Better than last year," he said, "but
reserves are weak. That Harmon
gave us the most trouble. And Eva-
shevski. Why, he's great, great."
* * * * .....
Without taking any credit away
from Bob Westfall, who turned in a
whale of a game and showed that he
belonged in the "charm" backfield,
one of the reasons he ran so well was
that State was over-shifting to the
strong side to prevent those end runs
by Harmon or Kromer. They were
more worried about the Touchdown
Twins than they were about Wolver-
ine fullbacks. They learned when
Westfall burst through the short-side
to set up the first touchdown.
The same thing was true of the
pass from Kromer to Harmon in
the flat that figured in the first
score. State had over-shifted
and as a result was out of position.
for the weak-side attack.
One of the impressive things about
this Michigan backfield is, in spite of
the individual brilliance of its com-
ponent parts, the way it acts as a

Army 9, Centre 6
Harvard 20, Bates 0
Dartmouth 34, Rampden-Sydneyf
Navy 14, Virginia 12
Pittsburgh 20, West Virginia 0
Maine 24, Rhode Island 0
Georgetown 25, Roanoke 0
New York U. 43, Penn Military
Alabama" 7, Fordhamn 6
Cornell 19, Syracuse 6

f

6
0

Boston U. 13, Franklin and Marshall 7
Army 9, Center 6
Louisiana State 26, Holy Cross 7
Yale 10, Columbia 7
Brown 20, Amherst 14
Manhattan 6, St Bonaventure 0
New York City College 19, Buffalo 0
Rutgers 20, Wooster {Ohio ) 0
Penn State 13, Bucknell 3
Princeton 26, Williams 6
New Hampshire 15, Northeastern 6
Penn 6, Lafayette 0
SOUTH
Tulane 12, Auburn 0
Tennessee 40, Sewanee 0
Kentucky 21, Vanderbilt 13
Mississippi 41, S.W.~ Tennessee 0
W. Kentucky Teachers 20, La. Tech 7
N. Carolina 13, Virginia Tech 6
Duke 37, Colgate 0
Clemson 25, 'N. Carolina State 6
Richmond 7, Washington and Lee 0
Virgina Military Inst. '2, Davidson 0
MIDWEST
Notre Dame 17, Georgia Tech 14
Iowa 32, Indiana 29
Nebraska 6, Minnesota 0
Oklahoma 23, Northwestern 0
Texas 17, Wisconsin 7
Ohio State 19, Missouri 0
Michigan 26, Michigan State 13
Chicago 12, Wabash 2
Butler 34, Indiana State 0
Ohio Wesleyan 33, Depauw 6
Kansas" 14, Iowa State 0
Carnegie Tech 6, Temple 0
Ohio U. 14, Western Reserve 0

I:
C
C
I:

Butler 34, 'Indiana State 0
Ohio State 19, Missouri 0
Oberlin 12, Rochester 0
Bowling Green 9, Wayne 0
Ohio Wesleyan 33, DePauw 6
Virginia Military 2, Davidson 0
Toledo 20, St. Mary's (Texas)
Akron 13, Illinois Wesleyan 6
West. State Teachers (Mich)I
Miami (Ohio) 0
Alma' 35, 'Olivet 6

12

6,

init., Everybody blocks for every
body else. It's a team back-field.
Ed Frutig, who confounded exper
by playing much better defensive
than offensively, took out three me
on one play when State tried to tur
his end. Two were of the State inte
ference and the third was Frutig him
self. He also tripped the ball-carrie

hr ______

AJ
PLANE

unouncig a
W and Better
I V.EL SERvIcE
-BUS

New York (A.L. AB
Crosetti, ss ...........4
Rolfe, 3b .. .........4
Keller, rf...........3
DiMaggio, cf........4
Dickey, c...........3.
Selkirk, lf.........2
Gordon, 2b.. ......4
Dahlgren, lb........4
Gomez, p...........1
Hadley, p...........3
Totals ...........32
Cincinnati (N.L.) AB
Werber, 3b ...........4
Frey, 2b .............4
Goodman, rf ........5
McCormick, lb .......5
Lombardi, c.........3
ZZ' Bordagaray .......0
Rershberger, c.......0
Craft, cf.............4
Berger, If ............4
Myers, ss...........3
Thompson, p........1
Grissom, p ..........0
Z Bongiovanni .......1
Moore, p............1

R H
10
1 1
3 2
1 1
0'0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0

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2
0
2
2
5
3
3
9
0
1

A
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Totals .........36 3 10 27 10
Z Batted for Grissom in 6th.
ZZ Ran for Lombardi in 7th.
N.Y., (AL. )...202030000
Cin. (N.L.).......1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Penn Takes Early Lead
To Defeat Lafayette, 6-0
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 7.-(IP-
Pennsylvania capitalized on a quick
kick to shove over a first period
touchdown and open its football sea-
son today with a 6 to 0 victory over
Lafayette before 30,000 at Franklin
Field.
Frank Reagan's boot caught the
Maroon secondary up close . and
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five. Sam Moyer's return punt car-
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