100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 1939 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E MICHIGAN DAII

hilharmonic Group Has Made
Music For Almost 100 Years

y Famous Conductors
wve Guided Destinies
N.Y._Symphony
history of the New York Phil-
nic-Symphony Orchestra is a
of uninterrupted music mak-'
zce the days, almost a century

en.the telephone, airplane and
vere undreamed-of 'miracles.
years the Philharmonic wasj
a rival, and, laid the founda-
the development of musical
New York.
from the pioneer work of,
lier men who 'served as con-
the two men who shaped
sical destinies of the Phil-
ic were Carl Bergmann and
*e Thomas. The latter, ac-
to Huneker, "did more for
al music in North America
ny previous conductor."
Seidl Succeeds
was the logical successor to
followed later by Emil Paur,
Damrosh, and then a,. series
conductors from all parts of

Symphony Has
* Amusing Notes.
Famed Photos
Autographs And Picture,
Adorn Walls At Offices
Of Philharmonic Grout
In the Philharmonic-Symphony
offices in the Steinway Building are
many autographs and pictures o:
famous musicians, as well as two
very amusing notes written by fam-
ous musicians.
On one of the walls is a note writ-
ten by the temperamental Russiar
,omposer, Wienlawski, in 1854 to his
publishers. The note reads: "Gurk-
haus! Gurkhaus! Gurkhaus! If you
don't send me proofs of my sonata
[ will write to the Emperor Nicholas
to send you to Siberia! Woe to you.'
'The other letter was written by
Richard Wagner in 1878. Wagner
wrote: "Inasmuch as I need a very
capable young musician as my as-
sistant, I have decided on Anton
Seidl. It will be necessary for him
to sLudy a great deal in order to play
my orchestral sketches. It will also
be necessary' to break him of his born
laziness", Seidl later became one of
the leading conductors'of his day and
conducted the Philharmonic for nine
years.
Beethoven, Wagner and Liszt were
the favorite composers mentioned in
Joseph Pulitzer's will when, in 1T11,
he left a bequest of $50%00 to the
orchestra. The first two are stil
leading -favorites but Liszt is some-
what out of fashion today.

6the system of engaging
ductors was abandoned. For
three years the Rusian,
afonoff was at the head of
estra. For the 68th aid
ns the services of the cele-
>mposer-conductor, Gustv
vas procured; from 1911-
ugh 1919-1920 Josef Stran-
ed the orchestra alone.
Pulitzer's will in 1911 pro-
i bequest of $500,000 to per-
orchestra, to place it on a .
pendentnbasis, to increase
per of concerts in the city
d rates, and to give, hear-
his favoritecomposers -

r.
>.
l
r-

JOHN BARBIROLLI
the Philharmonic-Symphony made
an historic visit to Europe in the
spring of 1930. It played 23 concerts
to sell-out houses in 15 different
cities including Paris, Zurich, Milan,
Rome, Florence and Munich. Other
cities in which concerts were given
were Vienna, Budapest, Prague, Ber-
lin, Brussels and London.
For ithe next five years Toscannini
returned regularly, to the Philhar-
monic but such other famous conduc-
tors as Erich Kleiber, Bruno Walter,
Otto Klemperer, Artur Rodzinski and
Sir Thomas Beecham also officiated
during this period.
The season of 1935-36 was the last
for Toscannini who, with 11 years of:
unparalled music-making behind him,
gave up the task he found too heavy
for him to the famous young English
conductor, John Barbirolli.

pphony was
armonic Or-
with it Wil-
rved as con-
years. Dur-
Eurtwaengler
as a guest
to the Sym-
I as conduct-
the Phi'har-
e New York
a which had
direction fii
ad succeeded
.rosch, foun-
t 1885.
ry of the or-
891 Carniege
a Music Fes-
Symphony
a. The fo-
nphony par-
s first New

Concerts
ncerts for Young
ited in 1897 and
16 by a -econd
children.
dtra went abroad,
rchestra to make
nvitations of the
countries visit-
under Damrosch
France, Monaco,
.nd and England.
on of Tosranini
Expert
us Fields

ARTURI RUBINSTEIN
For more than a quarter of a century, this
popular Polish pianist has been building a
world-wide reputation among musicians.
Mr. Artur Rubinstein will return fQr his
second engagement for the Choral Union
concerts this year.,
WEDNESDAY - MARCH 6
-I

*1
7
7
YF
e
f
Dt

C

)RA

JN

(

-A

,,,',

again presents

,, * .

The greatest names

III

inMVusic

,I

I I"

i

1-

Tuesday, October 24
SERGEI RACHMANINOFF

Pianist

N

Monday, November 6
FRITZ KREISLER

Violinist

I I

. . . . . .0

Monday, November 13
ALEXANDER KIPNIS

" ds :" r 40

BaA

Monday, November 27
NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC-
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
JOHN BARBIROLLI, Conductor
Monday, December 4
JUSSI BJOERLING . . .

Tenor

."

/

Thursday, December 14
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
SERGEI KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor
Monday, January 15
KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD . . . . . Soprano
Thursday, January 25
ROBERT VIROVAI . . . . . . Violinist
Wednesday, February 14
BARTLETT and ROBERTSON. . Pianists
Wednesday, March 6
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN.. . . . Pianist

1.

11

1I

.1

,11,1.

I

things are
violinist.

true of
For in-

as fine a pianist as he is a
in the opinion of many.
a painter too, having studied
famous atelier of Julien, in
.ce gave up his violin career
and planned to become a
eaks Latin and Greek With
irst professional tour was
America when he was four-
frequently mistaken for
n's football coach.

I

is

SEAkON TICKETS... 120- 1 - 88-$6
Please make remittances payable to University Musical
Society, and mail to Charles A. Sink, President, School
of Music, Ann Arbor.
MAIL ORDERS filled in advance in sequence.
OVER-THE-COUNTER SALE
of unordered tickets to be announced later.

1I

/

11

I

4

BARTLETT & ROBERTSON

The blendig of two personalities and
two instruments in programs of deep
interest, rake their joint appearances,

II

1I

i

events, rather than mere

cohcerts.

,:I.,

1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan