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February 28, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-02-28

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StIE ll i icf lN M

Lessor beams
I Talk Here
Centrifuges

5-

tg Eanployed By University
Since 1888, Recalls Presidents

i
1

Glamor Girl Rbel s

'echniques Of Producing
High Rotational Speeds
Is Lecture Topic M onday
High speed centrifuges will be dis-
ussed by Prof. J. W. Beams of the
niversity of Virginia at 8 p.m. Mon-
ay in the Amphitheatre of the Rack-'
gn Building in the third series of.
cientific lectures sponsored here by
he society of Sigma Xi, national
cientific honor fraternity.
Discussed by Professor Beams will
e the latest techniques in produc-
ig high rotational speeds and some
f the applications of recently de-
eloped ultra-centrifuges. A descrip-
on of air-driven} as well as electri-
ally-propelled centrifuges and their
articular adaptations to tchical
roblems, such as the concentration;
fisotopes, the purification of bio-
gical materials and .the determina-
on of particle and molecular size
rid weight.
Professor Beams is professor of
hysics at the Rouss Physical Labor-
ory, University Station, at the Uni-
etity of Virginia aind has included
konrg lis researches the measure-
ent-of very short time intervals, the
err effect, electrical discharges and
he ultracentrifuge.
uUnds For Project
Are B ing Received
Final payments are now being re-
eived by the Alumni Association of-
ce here for the Alumni 10-Year
roject of the University of Michi-
an Club of New York City.
This project, organized just 10
ears ago, is the Faculty Salary En-
ownent Fund, to be used by the
oard of Regents to enlarge faculty
geppnsations, where merit is evi-
sit:
More than $200,000 were pledged
o the fund, T. HawleS Tapping, gen-
:al secretary of the Alumni Associa-
ip, recalled. He added that while
jany pledges were long ago paid in
0l, "nal payments are now being
ebied from a great many others.

By WILLIAM NEWTON
George J. Lutz, Sr., 82 year-old fore-
man who has been employed by the
University since 1888, said yesterday
that he has one most-cherished pos-
session after more than 51 years of
continuous service in the buildings
and grounds department.
That possession, he remarked, is
the memory of at least a speaking
acquaintance with every president of
the University since President Hai-
en.
"It certainly was a lucky day for
me when I got my job here," Lutz
continued. "I have enjoyed my work,
I have met some wonderful men and
I have seen the University grow from
a little school on what is now called
the "campus" to a gigantic institu-
tion that spreads over a large part of
Ann Arbor."
The size of the University is the
most noticeable change since 1888,
Lutz continued: back in the old days,
everyone knew everybody else, but
now there are too many people-pro-
fessors and students alike-to per-
mit anyone to keep track of very.
many of them.
"I started my work as a janitor,
though I was really a painter by
trade," Lutz recalled. "Four or five
other janitors, commandeered during
the summer months, were able to take
care of all the University painting,
under my supervision. Now I have
44 men working full-time under me,.
all of them painters."
Class spirit ran high in the earli-
est days of the University, Lutz com-
mented. One morning in 1912 he
was called from bed shortly after
dawn to perform emergency repairs
on the flag-pole of the campus. High-
spirited students, he said, had raised
a banner bearing the numerals of
their class to the top, then cut the
halyards. "And I had to shinny up
that slippery pole to get the flag down
and install new lines," Lutz said.
The students of the University have
changed very little in 51 years, Lutz
stated. The men seem younger, he
said, but that may be because of the
moustaches they used to wear. "The
coeds? Oh, I figure there have al-
ways been lots of pretty girls here.
They're still pretty darned good-look-
ing, but I guess I've grown used to
them since 1888," he explained.
The most exciting of his experi-
ences, Lutz said, occurred the day he
witnessed one of the last body-snat-

chings in this state. It was in 1905
or 1906, he recalled, when one morn-
ing he saw three men ride up to the
old Medical Building in a buggy. Two
of them lifted the third out and threw
him into a window of the basement,
where cadavers were kept, then drove
off hurrieudly, he said.
A little later the sheriff )f a neigh-
boring county appeared and arrested
the men when they returned to the
building, he continued. They had
robbed a fresh grave the night before,
he said, and had driven more than
40 miles with the corpse sitting be-
tween them in the buggy. Shortly
after this the State passed a law
providing the University with cadav-
ers for medical work, relieving every-
one at the University of a great deal
of worry and trouble, Lutz conclud-
ed.
Smt To- g Gie
- mun1110 lve
Talk On Christ
Religious LectureTo Be
Third In Series
"Christ, Natural or Supernatural?"
is the general subject to be discussed
by Wilbur M. Smith of Chicago at
the Michigan Christian Fellowship's
meeting at 4 p.m. Sunday in the
Grand Rapids Room of the League.
Dr. Smith, a member of the Ameri-
can School for Oriental Research and
also of the Victoria Institute of Lon-
don, has already given two lecture
on this subject here. He is known as
an author, editor and compiler of
Sunday School data.
The Michigan Christian Fellow-
ship is a group composed of inter-
denominational Christian students at.
the University. It holds meetings
throughout the school year on relig-
ious subjects. -
Prof. Slosson To Speak
On World Events Trends
Taking as his theme, "This Mad
World," Prof. Preston W. Slosson of
the history department will lecture
at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the Rackham
Amphitheatre under the auspices of
Pi Lambda Theta, honorary women's
education .sorority.
From his analysis of the present
international conditions between the
United States and Japan and from
general current events, Professor
Slosson will venture to predict what
the succeeding trends in world affairs
will be.

Remember all those pretty pic-
tures of Brenda Frazier, the glam-
or debutante? Well, here is Miss
Frazier in revolt. This picture,
made recently at a New York hotel,
shows the glamorous Brenda look-
ing distinctly NOT pretty for the
camera.
The Wrong Films,
Blut All1 A Mistake;
Flynes Apologizes
James Hynes, '40, was apologizing
last night to all the people who came
to see the Michigan Ski Club's mo-
tion pictures of Sun Valley. Some
dissatisfaction, Hynes understated,
was expressed at the fact that the
films shown last night in the Rack
ham Auditorium were duplicates of
those shown some time ago.
The whole thing was a ghastly mis-
take, Hynes said, and will be recti-
fied soon. A wayward press agent is
to blame, but the new films will be
sent here and shown as soon as pos-
sible. Ih addition to the Sun Valley
film which should have been shown
last night, there may be a feature
length picture showing Austrian ski
champs in action. The longer film's
showing depends largely upon wheth-
er or not clipper ship service between
this country and Europe continues,
for the reels must come from Austria,
Hynes said.
Cam.pus men Attend Meet
Head football coach Herbert O.
"Fritz" Crisler and*T. Hawley Tap-
ping, general secretary ofs the Alum-
ni Association, attended a meeting
of the University of Michigan Club of
Cleveland yesterday.

Classified Directory]

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
12c per reading line (in basis of
five average words to line) for one

reading line for three or
rtions.
m of 3 lines per inser-

These low rates are on the bps
cash payment before the ad is
serted. If it is inconvenient fpr
u to call at our offices to make
nyemnt, a messenger will be sent
pick up your ad at a slight extra
arge of 15c.
For further information call
-24-1, or stop at 420 Maynard
reet.
TYPING-18
NG- Experienced. Miss Allen,
8 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
-416. 34
LAUNDERtING -9
[NDy - 2-1044. Sox darned.
reful work at low prices. 1q

TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
illins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
WANTED -TO BUY-4
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. MaIn Street.
146
FOR RENT
FOR MEN-Modern front room;
innerspring mattress; oil burner;
$3. 901 Packard. 301
STRAYED, LOST, FOUND -1
LOST-Hamilton wristwatch, leather
strap. Finder please call S. D. Mar-
riner at the Law Club. 298
LOST - Abercrombie-Fitch wrist-
watch near Allenel or League. Re-
ward. Call Paul Smith, 4917. 296
MISCELLANEOUS-20
WANTED-Girl to share 3-room
apartment. Close to Campus. Call
2-3569.
ARTICLES FOR SALE-3
FOR SALE: Red cocker puppies. Lit-
ter registered. Two males, one fe-
male. Phone 6367. 292

I

PROF. TEEQUIZ syays:-

I

I

UESTION: When are
rates lowest?
ANSWEI: Every night
day Sundays.

long distance telephone
after 7 o'clock and all

T

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A Michuigan Produ .. Since 187;'
SCOTCH SODA SASPAR]ILLA

With reduced rates in effect nights and Sundays on
calls to most points, you can keep in touch with home
and friends easily and economically by telephone. Rates
to points not shown below will be found on page 5 of
the telephone directory, or can be obtained from "Long
Distance" (dial 0).
RATES FOR THREE-MINUTE NIGHT AND
SUDAY STATION-TO-STATION CALLS
ANN ARBOR to:

LIME RICKEY
' GINGER ALE

PIX UP
SOFT DRINKS
(all flavors)

At Your Loa Dealer

Shows Daily at 2; 4 - 7 -9 P.M.

rr11r ii 1

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