100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 25, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAYMAT

HANDY SERVICE DIRECTORY I

ARTICLES FOR SALE
ENTIRE FURNISHINGS of beauti-
ful home for sale. Also furniture
for student rooms-No dealers-
can be seen anytime after 12:30,
1004 Oakland Ave. 468
LAUNDERING -9
LAUNDRY -- 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16

SENIORS!

IN

HELP WANTED
'IIP E-KNOCK IT OVER-TURN
IT UPSIDE DOWN. The KANT-
SPILL INK-WELL does not spill.
Sold in combination with beau-
tiful long-life fountain feed pen,
writing over 200 words with one
dip. Fast selling, profitable item.
Offices and stores, factories and
filling stations, secretaries and
housewives-they all buy. Full in-
formation by return mail Earn
some easy money during vacation.
Haarer & Company-Box 389 MO.
Lansing, Michigan. 470
STRAYED, LOST, FOUND- 1
GOLD ELGIN wrist watch. Call
2-4401, Rm. 324, Michigan House.
466
WANTED-TO BUY--4
BEN THE TAILOR--More money for
your clothes.' Open evenings.
122 E. Washington. 329

Order your Subscription
for the
Michigan Alumnus
NOW
$2.00 for 1 year

===-

=

w

Pens - Typewriters - Supplies
"Writers Trade With Rider's"
RIDER'S
302 South State St.

UI

: ?o '

Randy Service
Advertising
Rates
Cash Rate s
1Zc per reading line for one or
two insertions.
10c per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Charge Rates
15c per reading line for one or
two insertions.
13c per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Five average words to a reading
line Minimum of three lines per
insertion.
CONTRACT RATES ON REQUEST
our Want-Advisor will be de-
lighted to assist you in composing
your ad. Dial 23-24-1 or stop at
the Michigan Daily Business Office,
420 Maynard Street.
TYPING-18
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public--excellent work.
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 20
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., Phone 5689. 374
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
HIGHEST CASH PRICES paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
'NY OLD CLOTHING-PAY $5.00
TO $500. SUITS, OVERCOATS,
FURS, MINKS, PERSIAN LAMBS,
DIAMONDS, TYPEWRITERS, &
CASH POR OLD GOLD. PHONE
SAM-6304. SUNDAY APPOINT-
MENTS PREFERRED. 359
WANTED -TO RENT--6
WANTED-a house to renrt next
September-at least 13 rooms.
Call 2-1454. 469
SFOR RENT
FOR RENT: Living room-bedroom
suite with large private porch.
Singles at $1.75. 1022 Forest. Phone
2-1196. 464
SUMMER SESSIONS room & board.
$63 for 8 weeks-Theta Xi Fra-
ternity, 1345 Washtenaw, call
Alexander 2-4480. Grad students
preferred. 451
- MOVING -
ELSIIFOR MOVING
& STORAGE CO.
Local and Long Distance Moving
Storage -Packing -Shipping
Every Load Insured
310 W. Ann Phone 4297
MISCELLANEOUS -20
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run list-
ings of your vacant houses in The
Daily for summer visiting profes-
sors. Dial 23-24-1 for special
rates.
Boats, Planes Seek Body
MUSKEGON; May 24.-()- Boats
and airplanes were used today in a
search for the body of Charles Rich-
ards, 16, who disappeared with a com-
panion May 11 while on a fishing trip
on Muskegon Lake.

Campus Poll
Reveals Trend
Against War
((,-iillned from Page 1)
-ons between this week's poll and
he similar one conducted last Octo-
5cr a control question involving
membership in United States mili-
ary organizations was asked in both
>olls. There was only six-tenths of
)ne percent difference in the an-
wers, indicating that the cross-sec-
ion sample of students questioned
vas of similar composition in iboth
instances.
It was noticed in tabulating, Vic-
:ry said, that some students who
vanted to declare war didn't want
.o fight in it themselves.
Of those 12 percent (271) males
,nswered "yes" to the question of
leclaring war, 15 percent (5) said
hat they would actually refuse mili-
ary and non-combatant service "if
he United States enters the war
within the next year." Sixty-three
percent (17) declared they would
volunteer and the remaining 22 per-
-ent (5) would accept the draft.
Last October the anti-war senti-
ment at Michigan approximated that
hrcughout the nation as revealed
y the Gallup polls, but the same
can hardly be said today, Vicary
said.
Morrison Is Named
As Annual Tung Oil
Banquet Chairman
(Continued from Page 1)
1929 Professor Morrison was the
principal speaker and at a later din-
ner he was awarded the Tung Oil
Crown. The decision in this contest
is rendered by acclanation measured
by a sound recorded of high decibel
capacity.
This year's principal speaker will
be Gov. Luren D. Dickinson who is
scheduled{ to present his first cam-
pus address on "Character in Democ-
racy." "However," Professor Brack-
ett stated yesterday, "the Governor
has gone on record as finding the
extempore form of address most
practicable in his busy speaking ca-
reer and he might possibly decide
to talk on something else at the last
minute."
Trotsky Is Attacked
MEXICO CITY, May 24.-VP)-
Leon Trotsky was injured slightly
and a secretary-bodyguard was kid-
napped in an attack on Trotsky's
home early today by some 20 ma-
chine-gunners, incendiarists and ri-
flemen. The exiled Russian charged
they were sent by Joseph Stalin

Scholarship's Place in Theatre
Contested By Sherman, Holland

Acting Does Not Require
Too Much Intelli gence,
Dramatist Asserts
"Tell stage struck students the the-
atre doesn't require too much intel-
ligence; as a matter of fact, it may
be a drawback," quoth Joseph Hol-
land, male lead in the Dramatic Sea-
son's "Winter's Tale", yesterday,
A graduate of the University of
Richmond, besides the London Royal
Academy of Art, Holland is qualified
to judge the worth of scholarship in
his field.
"I acquired good training in dra-
matics at school, of course," he ad-
mitted, "but I have seen the 'know-
it-all' complex ruin too many young
scholars' chances before the foot-
lights. The capacity for reaching

inportiance Of Education
In Career On Stage
Is Given Support
"University students might be in-
terested in kmowing that scholarship
will be invaluable to them in the the-
atre," declared jovial, moon-faced
Hiram Sherman in an interview yes-
terday.
With only one year at the Uni-
versity of Illinois to his credit (his

HIRAM SHERMAN
objection to compulsory ROTC cut
short his college career), Sherman
spoke from a wealth of experience
garnered on Broadway and on tour
throughout the country.
"Actors who enter their field with-
out 'book larnin' are handicapped by
having to study backgrounds for the
interpretation of every period role,"
he explained. "There is such a thing
as applying one's self to the theatre
too academically, of course, but this
fault lies more with drama critics
than actors."
Sherman, who is playing a role in
"The Winter's Tale" this week, took
part for a time in the Federal The-
atre venture.

Big Ten
Highlights...
ly GEORGE SALLADE
The Big Ten, although overcome
with spring fever and of dread final
exams, had its full quota of special
events this week.
Minnesota spent the week making
plans for a new student identifica-
tion system which will be similar to
the one used at Michigan. Each stu-
dent will carry a card with his signa-
ture and picture. At the same time
all loyal Gophers were engaged in
hot pre-convention battles for con-
trol of the state delegations to their
Mock Political Convention.
The real news from Northwestern
University concerns a new education-
al plan for engineers. A fund of sev-
en million dollars is being donated
to finance it. The plan consists of
a division of the semester into seven
week periods. The first period will
be devoted to study in the class room
while the second seven weeks will be
spent working at jobs in which the
principles learned in the class room
are applied.
The University of Chicago's Round
Table hits the headlines this week
for its unusual broadcast. The pro-
gram was not only on the air waves
but for the first time was on a com-
bined radio and television program.
Ohio State gets this column's or
anybody's four bells for having the
most unusual Queen. It seems the
local Veterinary Fraternity didn't
like the original May Queen selection,
so they selected Jean Scott, grand
champion and Belgian Mare, as their
May Queen.

>::
w..
r
t

JOSEPH HOLLAND
emotional depths seems' to be the
more important requisite."
Holland, blue-eyed, of impressive
stature, and possessor of a booming
Shakespearean voice, did not, despite
his viewpoint on intelligence, mean
to discourage students from trek-
king to Broadway.

WARM-WEATHER
cooking is

.i

A ll
jbo

/.

>,
.{,
.

M N I N N N N IM., .

You will like the tempting thirst-quenching flavor of
your favorite brand of Beer and Wine better from-
THE BEER VAULT
303 N. Fifth Ave.
IDEAL TEMPERATURE CONTROL
Ideal Service in Your Car
DIAL,8200 FOR DELIVERY

rnat

e more p.aiani

/Or yourie[ all]f r

Attu l41

T E modern way of prepar-
ng meals is cool and pleas-
ant ... as easy as plugging in
your electric toaster, Simply
put a whole dinner into your
electric cooker at one time,
and go out for the afternoon
while the meal is cooking.
When you come home your
dinner is waiting, perfectly
cooked and ready for the
table.
Spend extra hours
out-of-doors

F

tLi UU fit al1. tl le fILeCL)'OLt

ithi we eenin. .

YiOU

lleal'oy

g ood /oo] an] corjetia I

a im oiptere.

MODERN GAS COOKERY IS
AVAILABLE TO FRATERNITY
AND SORORITY HOUSES, TOO

II

7'/we fi/lehel /otel

126 East Huron Street

Phone 4241

i

An electric cooker brings you
freedom from the kitchen,
more leisure time to spend out-
of-doors. You'll enjoy the
cleanliness and convenience of
this up-to-date cooking
method. But you'll also marvel
at the deliciously different
FLAVOR of foods cooked elec-
trically.
Electric cooking is healthful
waterless cooking. Important
minerals and food values are
SEALED-IN ... meats and veg-
etables cook to melting ten-
derness in their own juices.
Your electric cooker will roast
a 15-pound turkey or a whole
ham. It will bake pies, cakes,
biscuits. It will steam and stew.
And it is economical to use.

You'll like the TIME-SAVING, FOOD-SAVING, and FUEL-SAVING that these
modern gas ranges, built specially for volume cooking, will bring to the fraternity and
sorority kitchen. You'll like the flexibility - the capacity - of these sturdy, compact
ranges, for you'll find they can adequately t;ike care of the cooking for the big crowd
on a Homecoming Day, or just as efficiently handle the cooking for the few around the
house during a vacation week. As have many others, you'll discover that the kitchen
keeps much cooler - the thoroughly insulated ovens see to that. And baking or roasting
is done without guesswork by the time and temperature method with the accurate oven
heat controls. mine broiling and griddle facilities are ready for instant use. The large
top burners give just the right heat for any type of top cooking - nstantly!
INVESTIGATE NOW THE ADVANTAGES THAT GAS WITH THESE
GARLAND RANGES OFFERS.

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan