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May 24, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICIHIGAN DAIL XY

FRIDAY, MAY 24, 1

t_

German Commander

Jimenez Links Allergy Trend
With High Intelligence Quotients

Ann Arbor

I

I

Here Is
In

Today's

News

Dumond, Tapping Speak
Prof. Dwight L. Dumond of the his-
tory department and T. Hawley Tap-.
ping, general secretary of the Alumni
Association, addressed the University'
of Michigan Club of Niles last night.

For the Finest
DEVELOPING and
PRINTING
r ig Your i m to
GACH CAMERA SHOP
14 NICKELS ARCADE

General Walther Von Reichenau
(above), High Commander in the
field of Adolf Hitler's 'Blitzkreig
armies, said, after Allied forces
stiffened: "It may be that our
present movements will come to a
temporary halt. Weyand (the
Aliedg eneralissimo) has ordered
every one to stand his ground. That
may mean hard fights ahead."
Annual Session
For Museums
Group Planned
Ruthven To Give Opening
Address To Convention
Today; Sach To Speak
More than 200 delegates from mu-
seums throughout the country will
conclude their 35th annual Amer-
ican Association of Museums con-
vention today in Ann Arbor.
Arriving at 10:30 a.m. from De-
troit, where they have been meeting
for the past two days, the delegates
will be welcomed by President Ruth-
ven at a general session in the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
The session, which will feature a
symposium on study for museum
work, will be opened by Dr. Paul J.
Sach, associate director of the Art
Museum at Harvard University, who
will speak on the topic, "Education
Training for Museum Work." He
will be followed by Dr., Theodore
Sizer, director of the Yale Art Gal-
lery, Yale University, who will dis-
cuss university preparation for art
museums, and Dr. Carl E. Guthe,
director of the University Museums,
who will discuss university prepara-
tion for science museums.
The symposium will also include
papers by Helen P. Findlay, New
York; Katherine Coffey, Newark,
N. J.; Laurence P. Roberts, Brook-
lyn, N. Y., and Harold T. Clement,
Buffalo, N. Y.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN_
(Continued from Page 4)
ning. Election of officers and social
hour.
Graduate Outing Club will meet
Sunday, May 26, at 2:30 p.m. in the
rear of. the Rackham Building. An
outdoor program is planned, with
supper available if desired. All grad-
uate students and faculty invited.
Those interested in forming a sum-
mer session committee to continue
the Outing Club program through
the summer session, call Abe Rosen-
zweig at 8233.
Athena Speech Society members
should meet at 1:30 Saturday after-
noon in front of the W.A.A.. If un-
able to attend the picnic, call Jane
Sapp or Jean Ramsey.
Congregational Student Fellow-
ship picnic on Sunday, May 26, at
the island. Reservations should be
made before Saturday noon by call-
ing Pilgrim Hall, 2-1679. Everyone
welcome.

Darwinian C0oiCiept Helps
Prove Actial Existence
Of Relationship Theory
By ROBERT SPECKHARD
You may have hives in the morn-
ing, indigestion in the afternoon and
top the day off with an attack of
asthma, but you have a compensa-
tion-you are more intelligent-and
don't let some skeptic convince you
otherwise, because we've got facts to
prove it, Dr. Buenaventura Jimenez,
head of the Allergy Department of
the Health Service declared yester-
day.
The conclusion is the result of nine
years of data compiled from com-
paring standardintelligence tests
given to incoming freshmen and
records of the Allergy Department,
Dr. Jimenez said.
From the deailed life histories of
the freshmen and relatives and actual
tests given at the Health Service, the
Allergy Department statistically sep-
arates those who are not allergic
(Control Group) and those who suf-
fer from various degrees of hyper-
sensitivity in order of severity (Aller-
gic Group I, II, etc.)
The intelligence scores of these
groups on the standard tests given
in psychology, algebra, English, and
"How to Sudy" are then computed.
The probability that these tests are
true measures of intelligence is high,
but not perfect, Dr. Jimenez stated,
but the results of correlating allergy
and intelligence recorcs are so indica-
tive of a relationship as to rule out
error in the conclusion.
An example will best illustrate the
basis for Dr. Jimenez' conclusion
that allergic people have a higher
degree of general intelligence. On
the English test 44.9 per cent of Al-
lergic Group I scored in the lower
half on the test, while 55.1 per cent
had scores ranging in the upper half.
In contrast to this only 46.9 per cent
of the non-allergic Control Group
scored in the upper half on the test,
while 53.1 per cent were in the lower
half.
This same stratification exists in
all the other tests with very minor
percentage differences, indicating
that the differences are not of partic-
Diana Barr ymore
Makes First Visit
To College Class
(Continued from Page 1)
to get though," she said, "but there
wasn't any especial stigma attached
to it. Everyone knows his professors
in Europe. I think you're missing
something."
A more pronounced criticism was
leveled by Miss Barrymore at the
method of teaching languages-that
of emphasizing reading and syntax
in beginning classes. "You didn't
learn to read English first, did you?"
she asked. "You had people talk a
lot of words at you before you began
to understand everything they said.
"You ought to learn to speak first,"
she declared. "Certainly you'll make
atrocious errors, but you'll learn from
them, When I was in Italy I prob-
ably shocked everybody by my terri-
ble Italian, but I soon learned some-
thing of the language, just by using
it."
The benches? Wel. along towards
the end of the hour they had more
and more effect in strengthening her
determination to stay clear of
schools. Although she had the
French equivalent of "Pardon me"
on the tip of her tongue she finally
decided that "The show must go
on" and so stuck it out.

ular abilities but of general intelli-
gence.
As far as a theory to explain this
phenomena, one must be tentative,
Dr. Jimenez said. Other work in
this direction has been done, how-
ever, and a theory has been evolved
explaining the relationship between
allergy and intelligenec that the data
proves does exist.
The frame of reference for the
theory is the Darwinian concept of
evolution through variation and in-
heritance. The theory itself is a
cellular explanationy
A person who inheitits the activity
to become specifically sensitive to cat
hair, pollen, food protein, or some
other offending agentrhas a body that
is made up of cells which are huper-
irritable or hyperactive compared
with the normal. The brain cells of
the allergic person may also be ir-
ritable or hyperactive compared with
the normal, which might account for
the hyperactive mind of the allergic
person.
Dr. Jimenez conceives of these peo-
ple with the variation of hyperactive
body and brain cells as being in ad-
vance of the main evolutionary
stream. Hyperactive brain cells re-
sult in greater mental activity (high-
er general intelligence) but hyper-
active body cells result in hypersen-
sitiveness or allergy. Those who are
more intelligent must suffer by be-
ing allergic.
Whether persons who are allergic
can adapt their hyperactive body cell
variation to our environment and
thus eliminate or reduce their aller-
gic condition is problematical, Dr.
Jimenez declared, but meanwhile
they can console themselves with the
thought that they are the more in-
telligent vanguard in the evolution-
ary stream.
New Glee Club
Heads Named
James Berger Will Serve
As Business Manager
James Berger, '41, will serve as
business manager of the Varsity
Men's Glee Club for the 1940-41
season, it was announced yesterday
at the annual Installation Banquet.
Berger, who had been elected vice-
president for the coming year, re-
signed that position after the an-
nouncement. The post will be filled
through a special election.
Other newly elected officers in-
stalled were Charles Brown, 41,
president; Cary Landis, '42, secre-
tary, and Robert Lovell, '42, trea-
surer. Prof. David E. Mattern of
the School of Music is director of
the club.
Following the banquet at the
Union, Glee Club members toured
the campus on the second half of
their traditional spring serenade,
singing to the wonen of Couzens
Hall, Mosher-Jordan, Stockwell Hall,
Kappa Alpha Theta, Collegiate Sor-
osis, Chi Omega, Kappa Delta, Al-
pha Phi and Gamma Phi Beta.
SENIORS!
Order your Subscription
for the
Michigan Alumnus
NOW
$2.00 For 1 year

Dr. Francis B. Vedder of he Uni-
versity's School of Dentistry has been
elected the new president of the
Washtenaw District Dental Society.
Dr. Vedder is secretary of the dental
school and professor of crown and
bridge prosthesis.
George Spalding, 18 years old, a
member of Co. K of the National
Guard was arrested Wednesday night
for allegedly looting desks in the
Armory office. The arrest was made
by Capt. Garnet J. Burlingame.
Spalding confessed stealing a total
of $45 from officers' desks.
* * *
Contributions for the Washtenaw
County Red Cross drive to raise $3,200
for the war relief fund continues to
flow in as the need appears to be in-
creasing. $1,280 has already been
collected.
The confession of two Ann Arbor
youths, 16 and 17 years old, that they
had held up Mrs. Lula C. Donegan
and her daughter while they were
eating lunch at their home on March
30, was reported by the police yes-
terday.

Pens - Typewriters - Supplies
"Writers Trade With Rider's"
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Phone 8270
Be SatisfiedWithA MICHIGAN DAILYClassified

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