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May 19, 1940 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-19

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PAGE EIGHT

THE 1-1 1CTIT AN DAILY

S D.Q.Y. MAY 19. 1940

T~lE M1UsIIl a f. 1 4lIblAI L1NlA AY lBd

\ l' Alll " ITII\ R l il AiJ 2l1

V

Ii - -- --._.-..._.__-.---- .- - _______________________ ___________________________ .._______w__

I ANI)Y LE IVM ICIRECTORIY

Annual Session
Of Museums

Daily Reporter Rides The Rails
With Hobo Emperor Jeff Davis

1

._._ ________.___ . __a__.__, _ _ .._._. _ _. _ _ _ _ _ . _ _ _
.. .

JUNE (4AnDIATES ONLY!
fe a Pnent Pimmn
TiIF MAGAZINE
Fall Y-a---52 Issuess
$3.50 (instead of)$5.00
Mailed Anywhere
homer Hayden
715 Hill Phone 3582
- MOVING -
ELSIFOR MOVING
& STORAGE CO.
Local and Long Distance Moving
Storage -Packing -Shipping
Every Load Insured
310 W. Ann Phone 4297
l

handy Service
Ad verti sing
Rates
Cash Rates .
12c per reading line for one or
two insertions.
10c per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Charge Rates
i5c ipr reading line for one or
two insertions.
13c- p snr reading line for three
or more insertions.
Five average words to a reading
life. Minimum of three lines per
insertion.
CONTRACT RATES ON REQUEST
Our Want-Advisor will be de-
ii ;hted to 0assist you in composing
your ad. Dial 23-24-1 or stop at
the Michigan Daily Business Office,
420 Maynard Street.

STRAYED,ST, FOUND Group Planned
LS -A Mu Pi Eplon~r sorOrc oieityioygggyji g Move here~g
pin, probably near the Library.
Call 3318. Reward. 444 From Detroit May 241
£-OST-Fratcrnity pin with initials
BBK probably vicinity of Morris The 35th annual meeting of the
Hall. Finder please call 2-1405- American Association of Museums
Reward. 438 will be held jointly in Ann Arbor and
WANTED-TO BUY-4 Detroit, May 22-24, it was announcedj
yesterday.

I

interview Obtained On 11 Of'[wilight Limuite
Yields Facts About Character Of Tramp King

COLLEGE OULINE SERIES
"THE STUDE NT'S PRIVATE TUTOR"

ANCIENT HISTORY
ANCIENT, MEDIEVAL & MODERN Hst
BACTERIOLOGY, Pri.&G rat.of..

ery

BIOLOGY. General
CHEMISTRY, First Year College
CHEMISTRY, Organic.......
CORPORATION FINANCE *
ECONOMICS, Principles of
EDUCATION, History of .
ENGLAND, Hstory of........,
EUROPE, 1500-1848 , H,,ry of
EUROPE, 1815-1939 istory of
GEOLOGY Principesofo . .
GOVERNMENT, Ameican
JOURNALISM. Survey of .
LATIN AMERICA, H iory of
LITERATURE, English, To Dryden
LITERATURE. EnglshSince Mion,
MIDDLE AGES, 300-1500, History of..
NATURAL RESOURCES of United States .
PHYSICS, F Nst Year College... .
POLITICAL SCIENCE ....
PSYCHOLOGY, Educational . .
PSYCHOLOGY, General.. .. .
SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS; Oullines of.,
SOCIOLOGY, Prncp~e, of , 4r
STATISTICAL METHODS ..A. ,M
STUDY, IBestih~Io,I.,of...........
UNITED STATES, To 1865. History of
UNITED STATES. Since 1865, HistIory of,
WORLDO, Snce 1914, Hsory of
ZOOLOGY, General...,..

. $ .75
y . 1.00
1 .25
75
*1.00
.,1.25
-.75
. .75
.79
.75
.75
1.00
.75
1.00
1.00
1.00
I .00
.75
. .75
* .75
. .75
.75
* .75
*1.00
1.00
.60
.75
. '.75
w1.00

UNEXCELLED FOR QUICK
THOROUGH REVIEW
IWA HRM'S*
Bookstores
316 South State St.

qIGHEST CASH PRICES paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown,512 S. Main Street.
146
ANY OLD CLOTHING-PAY $5.00
TO $500. SUITS, OVERCOATS,
FURS, MINItS, PERSIAN LAMBS,
DIAMONDS, TYPEWRITERS, &
CASH FOR OLD GOLD. PHONE
SAM-6304. SUNDAY APPOINT-
MENTS PREFERRED. 359
TYPING--18
ITYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., Phone 5689. 374
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
HELP WANTED
COOK OR COUPLE for small fra-
ternity starting in fall. State ex-
perience, references, salary. Box 5,
The Daily. 445
EARN during vacation, $5.00 and up
daily selling article appealing to
housewife. One at least and per-
haps more for every home. Write
/for information to Slp-Lok. Inc.,
53%2 West Huron Street, Pontiac.
Michigan. 442
ARTICLES FOR SALE-3
FOR SALE-Girl 's bicycle, balloon
tires. New last summer, $16.50.
Call evenings-2-3559. 439
FOR SALE-From owner, Franklin
Olympic car; good running order;
good tires; also outstanding for
winter. Phone 2-3515. 449
A BARGAIN you can't duplicate---40
scenic acres overlooking beautiful
valley-including well built six-
room house--only four miles from
Ann Arbor-Sacrifice for cash,
$2500. Call owner evenings-6196.
FOR RENT
TO RENT for Summer seven-room
furnished house. Available June
15. Call 2-3643. 428
FOR SUMMER: 3-room furnished
apartment for two or three per-
sons. 515 Church. Phone 4373. 447
FOR RENT--Cottage, Portage Lake.
Five rooms. Clean, well furnished,
electrically equipped. Ph. 2-1405.
448
425 SOUTH DIVISION Apartment
for graduate students or business
people-also a single room--phone
2-2352. 440
WOMEN STUDENTS: Very pleasant
rooms in approved house for sum-
mer term opposite Rackham Bldg.
917 E. Huron. Phone 8671. 443
LAUNDERING-9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16
MISCELLANEOUS- 20
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run list-
ngs of your vacant houses in The
Daily for summer visiting profes-
sors. Dial 23-24-1 for special
rates.
hI

The convention will open in Detroit
Wednesday, and will come to the Uni-
versity of Michigan Friday. The
opening session of the convention will
feature a symposium on the "New
Public Museum." Meeting in Annj
Arbor the delegates will visit the Uni-
versity Museums, and discuss the
problem of study for museum work.
Arrangements for the convention
are being made by Clyde H. Bur-
roughs, secretary of the Detroit In-
stitute of Arts; Fred L. Black of the
Edison Institute; Miss Margaret M.
Borayton, curator of the Detroit
Children's Museum; Robert T. Hatt,
director of the Cranbrook Institute
of Science; Arthur S. Hampton, cur-
ator of the Detroit Historical Soci-
ety, and Carl E. Guthe, director of
the University Museums.
The symposium on the "New Pub-
lic Museum" will include a talk byl
Mr. Edsel B. Ford, son of Henry
Ford and chairman of the Arts Com-
mission of the City of Detroit, who
will talk from the angle of a trustee.
His address will be followed by
speeches of a director, a curator and
an instructor.
New Publicity Head
David Lachenbruch, '42, was ap-
pointed chairman of The Daily Pub-
licity Committee of Congress, Inde-
pendent Men's Association, at a spe-
cial meeting yesterday.

(This was written after a trip from
Jackson to Ann Arbor with the King
of the Hoboes, by his favorite mode
of travel.)
By DAVE LACHENBRUCH
The Twilight Limited puffed into
the Jackson depot arbout five minutes
late. I had arranged to meet King
Jeff Davis at the eastern end of the
platform and ride as far as Ann Arbor
with him. He was coming from Mil-
waukee and heading for the Hoboes
of the World Convention in Windsor,
Ontario.
When the engine wheezed to a stop,
I was confronted by a jovial, oldish-
looking man whom I mistook for the
engineer. "I'm Jeff Davis," he an-
nounced. I introduced myself and
looked at the train for the first time.
"This is a passenger train," I ex-
claimed. "How long do you think it
would take, son," he explained toler-
antly, "if I rode from Milwaukee to
Detroit on the freights?"
As the train started to pull out,
Jeff pounced up onto the front plat-
form of the first passenger car. He
held out his hand and I scrambled
after him. We crouched for a while
on the car platform listening to the
engine pick up steam and gazing at
the coal heaped up on the tender in
front of us. Presently Jeff shouted:
"We're going up onto the tender--
it's more comfortable." We jumped
across the gap between the car plat-
form and the tender and climbed a
short slender steel ladder.
We were sitting on a flat ledge
behind the coal pile. I was holding
on tightly with both hands, while Jeff
calmly rolled a cigarette. "This is
the water tank," the King explained.
I was just beginning to enjoy being

jounced about when Jeff started to
migrate again, this time to the top
of the coal pile. "Come on," he
shouted, "I think we hit a scoop
around here." I reached for my pen-
cil and yelled, "Where?"
My question was answered abrupt-
ly. There was a terrific din in my
ears. I realized that I was being
drenched with an enormous amount
of water at considerable pressure.
My first thought was that a fire hose
was being squirted full force in my
face. "That's the scoop," Jeff ex-
plained. "You see, the scoop's on a
hinge in the roadbed, and when the
train comes by the force of the air
splashes the water up into the tank.
Yoare sitting on the tank."
Without even saying "tanks," I
climbed in my moistened state to the
top of th coal pile where Jeff was.
We were getting near Ann Arbor and
the Emperor suggested that I'd het-
ter "hop off" when the train slowed
down. I couldn't jump, so he pushed
me and I landed in the grass, shocked
but uninjured. I could hear him
taunting me from the tender. "Give
my regards to Mademoiselle Yvette,"
he was shouting.
He went on to Detroit and is now
in Windsor, but the whole campus
will have the opportunity to hear
him discuss "A Hash on Life" at 8
p.m. next Tuesday when he speaks
in the Union.

Clark Speaks
On Difficulties
Of Job Misfits
(Con tinued from Page 1)
ing and guidance can do much to
develop these qualities."
Stressing personality and appear-
ance in job qualification, the seniors
of Jackson High School conducted
a forum on successful vocational
preparation. The forum pointed out
the importance of physical and men-
tal aptitude in vocational planning,
marking particularly the value of
choosing a preferred type of work.
Statistics showing that every man
spends 5 to 10 years before making
the final choice of his life work were
cited as proof of a need for more
vocational guidance training. The
speaker warned that in choosing a
vocation one should not think of it
in terms of a well-known personage
who has made a success in that par-
ticular field, but should think of it
in terms of one's own chances for
success.
s

li

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

out for yourself.

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Arms Budget Will Not Reduce
Social Spending, Smithies Says
By CHESTER BRADLEY bad public policy to allow sections
The U.S. economy can withstand of the economy to profit from the
the strain of the increased arma- national emergency.
ments appropriations recommended Furthermore, it will be advisable,
to Congress by President Roosevelt as recovery advances, to finance the
Thursday without reducing the so- bill for arms to an increasing extent
cial service expenditures, Prof. Ar- by taxation rather than by borrow-
thur Smithies of the economics de- ing, Professor Smithies pointed out.
partment declared in an interview if sound policy is to be followed.
yesterday. Finally, if the government is tor
Professor Smihies added that no become the chief customer of a
j11stifiea ion exjs<l.S for the elimina- sizable section of American indus-
tion of a single item of useful pub- try, it will incur added responsibility
ic works projects or for reducing for economic stability in the future,
the relief payments of those unem- he said.

- w
FROM- jr
X

(Continued from Page .5)
horn will speak on "The Trinitarians'
Responsibilities."
First Methodist Church: Morning
Worship Service at 10:40 a.m. Dr.
Charles W. Brashares will preach on
"Second Choice Lives."
Stalker Hall: Student Class at 9:30
a.m. at Stalker Hall. Prof. George
E. Carrothers will lead the discus-
sion on "Qualifying for Leadership."
Wesleyan Guild meeting at 6 p.m.'
at the Church. This will be Installa-
tion of the Student Council for next'
year. Dr. Brashares will speak. Fel-
lowship hour and supper following
the meeting.
The Michigan Christian Fellow-
ship will hold its regular fellowship
meeting at 4:30 p.m. today in the
Fireplace Room of Lane Hall. All
students are invited to attend.

America's Most
FORGOTTEN MAN
The Carpet Beater
. . . and rightfully so, because
with our new equipment we caxi
do much more efficient work.
AMERICAN RUG
CLEANING WORKS

Y EISJN'S
207 S. Main Street

We Deliver

Phone 8115

I,

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ployed who are not directly or indi-
rectly absorbed by the expanded
arms industries, simply to finance
the arms program.
The arms program is likely to
operate as a powerful stimulus to
recovery. which will in turn affect
the political situation this fall, Pro-
fessor Smithies said. Unemployment
will be considerably lessened, so that
decieased relief expenditures will
'end to offset the adverse effect of
the heavier arms budget.
Three chief dangers in the in-
creased arms program were foreseen
by Professor Smithies. First, it is

'77
/4 >~

Cotton flays are here aga

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COLLINI

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Stripes Forever
t
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LASTEX PANTIES
stled by
You're ready for active or spec-
tator sports in this clever action-

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47,2

Coo/ (nd Reres/nA
summer suits of "MOUNTAIN AIR"

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F~' :; > r
_.,o-".a^
/' ott 3
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;i f
f
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t
ry

No more worry
to wear, now t
are "in." For
there's nothing
ciously cool, yet
styled cotton.
materials you'l
spun rayon, do
voile, eyelet
pique, batiste,
able linen, sha
seersucker. Stc
at COLLINS for
able summer!
$4.00 to

/
'6
S>1
about .what /
hot cottons
worm dray's
like a deli-
beautifully /
Among the
I find are
atted swiss,
embroidery,
non-crush-
rkskin, and
Eck up now
o comfort-
X19.95

KEEP COOL as a cucumber in these
-1piecers. Styles and colors to wing
you into summer with compliments
hom your friends. Of spun rayon
with white raindrop pattern on pas-
tvls or navy, or solid sun-drenched
tones. Sizes i-20.
Others of soun non-crush linens and

795
Sketched
from

COTTONS
featured
at
COLLINS
from $4.00 to $19.95

frce pantic. RUIIpr-oof crotch.
lightly boned to prevent rolling.
Self-edged top and bottom give
smooth lines. $3.50.
Also in foundation, $5; girdle

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