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May 17, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THlE MICHITGAN DX-TAV

FRIDAY, MAY - 7, -9.4

Hillel Will Hold
Annual Banquet
Ruthven, Fewer To Speak
t Ceremony Sunday
Hillel Foundation will celebrate its
13th anniversary on the Michigan
campus with a banquet in the Michi-
gan Union at 6:30 p.m. next Sunday
at which President Ruthven and
Rabbi Leon Feuer of Toledo will
be honored guests.
President Ruthven will give a short
address and Rabbi Feuer will give the
principal talk on "What is a Modern
Jew?" during the program which will
also feature the presentation of
awards and the installation of new
officers.
Hillel Cabinet will present a new
bronze plaque to the Foundation
which will be engraved annually with
the names of the 10 persons who in
the opinion of the director have con-
tributed the most to Hillel.

Benefit Tag Day
For Boys' Camp
To Be Held Here
Staging a state-wide drive to fin-
ance the construction of five cabins
at its summer camp near Albion, the
Starr Commonwealth for Boys will
hold its annual tag day here tomor-
row.
This is the first year in which the
proceeds will be entirely devoted to
the camp project. James Inglis, local
resident, has already endowed one
cabin, which is to be named in his
honor.
The Commonwealth, established
26 years ago, was planned for mal-
adjusted boys and whose home
environments were undesirable. Its
aims included the desire to give the
boys care, develop in them self-re-
spect, and create interest among
them for art, music and athletics.
A contingent of boys from the
Commonwealth will be stationed at
various points tliroughout the city
to sell the tags.
Local Redl Cross Group
Starts Two Day Drive
Contributions to the $3,200 quota
set for the Washtenaw County Chap-
ter of the American Red Cross' na-
tionwide 10 million dollar drive will
be accepted in three local banks to-
day and tomorrow, members of the
relief organization here announced
yesterday.
All other donations may be sent to
the local office, 600 Wolverine Build-
ing, Ann Arbor. Checks will be ac-
corded a written receipt.

German Troops In Belgium, Nazis Say

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MICH IGAN.
Unforgettable Adventure!
Reckless Romance!

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This picture, sent by radio from Berlin to New York, shows, ac-
cording to the German caption, Nazi soldiers in a military car as they
approached their position in Belgium. The caption called attention to
the damaged arch in the background, indicating it was the work of
Belgian demolition crews trying to check the invasion.

{t NS
gE
Isp.
iM RpN p

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

1i[

FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1940
VOL. L. No. iu5
Notices
Student Accounts: Your attention
is called to the following rules passed
by the Regents at their meeting of
February 28, 1936:
"Students shall pay all accounts due
the University not later than the last
day of classes of each semester or
Summer Session. Student loans
which fall due during any semester
or Summer Session which are not
paid or renewed are subject to this
regulation; however, student loans
not yet due are exempt. Any unpaid
accounts due at the close of business

also
DALIES FRANTZ
"Door Will Open"

11

on the last day of classes will be re-
ported to the Cashier of the Univer-
sity, and
" (a) All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the semes-
ter or Summer Session just complet-
ed will not be released, and no tran-
script of credits will be issued.
" (b) All students owing such ac-
counts will not be allowed to register
in any subsequent semester or Sum-
mer Session until payment has been
made."
S. W. Smith, Vice-President
and Secretary
To the Members of the University
Senate: There will be a meeting of
the University Senate on Monday,
May 20, at 4:15 p.m. in the Rackham
Lecture Hall.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary
Seniors: Interesting and instruc-
tive bulletins are published by the
University of Michigan several times
a year. These bulletins are mailed
to all graduates and former students.
In order that you may receive these,
please see that your correct address
is on file at all times at the Alumni
Catalog Office, University of Michi-
gan. Lunette Hadley, Director.
Choral Union Books: Members of
the Choral Union are reminded that
the deadline for the return of Choral
Union books and the $2.50 refund
expires today at 4 o'clock. After that
date no refunds will be-made.
International Center: All students
who have orders at the Internantiol
Center for pictures of International
Night should call for them at the
office of the Center as soon as pos-
sible.
Applications for positions as Assist-
ant Personnel Manager, Assistant
Purchasing Agent, and Assistant
Treasurer will be accepted at the
Treasurer's Office of the Michigan
Wolverine Student Cooperative, Inc.,
until Thursday, May 23.
The WPA Department of Corre-
spondence Instruction, sponsored by
the University of Michigan Extension
Service, will hold open house Mon-
day, May 20, in- its offices in the
South Department Building, North
University at Washtenaw, from 3 to 9
(Continued on Page 4)
Prof. Dawson To Speak
Prof. John P. Dawson of the Law
School will speak on "Civil Liberties
and the War" at Hillel's regular Fire-
side Discussion at 7:30 p.m. today.

Prof. Barnes
Predicts End
OfEngland
Foresees 'Defeat By Nazis
From Without, Fascists
From Within' In Lecture
(Continued from Page 1)
chance of their maintaining the old
social system.
Barnes named Soviet Russia and
the United States as the only two
nations remaining who can "bridge
the gap between our institutions
and our science by civilized means."
For the U.S. to do this, however,
"she must stay out of war at any
cost," he explained.
"This is no Holy War, as we are
told. All the nations involved are
guilty in one degree or another; but
Hitler has more blood on his hands.
"Great Britain is our most dan-
gerous enemy today, because we are
'suckers' for her propaganda. Ger-
many is not likely to attack us, and
John Bull is almost certain to pull
us in the battle if the war continues
much longer."
A "civilized victory" is impossible
after this war, Barnes asserted. If
Britain and France win it will mean
fascism, and if Germany wins it will
be a triumph of militarism.
"America's policy should be 'Let
American save America and let God
save the King'."
Britain is maintaining the balance
of power in Europe.
Professor Barnes noted that the
3000 miles between the United States
should be used as a defense barrier
against European aggressors, not
as a. protection of Europe against
the United States.

Big Ten
Highlights.. .
By GEORGE W. SALLADE
With most of the Big Ten occupied
in last minute cramming for the too
soon to come finals, activity was at
low ebb throughout the conference
this week.
Northwestern and Ohio State were
still under the influence of queenitus
The Buckeyes after much confusion
had four members of their depart-
ment of psychology pick seven candi-
dates for May Queen. Northwestern,
with less difficulty than Ohio State,
finally got around to having the
official coronation of the lucky girl
selected as their Queen of the month.
This week's student opinion poll
was taken at the University of
Wisconsin while over 5,000 grade-
school students were engaged in a
songfest at the local field house.
Madison's intellectuals were asked
what books they would take with
them to a desert island. The
Bible was chosen first with
Shakespeare running a poor sec-
ond. Curiously enough only nine
of the first 50 picked were on the
list of 100 classics of St. John's
College.
Indiana University was making
plans for Parent's Day and the Con-
ference of Higher Learning during the
past week. Two hundred schools will
be represented in the conference, and
its aim is to coordinate the work of
universities and local civic organiza-
tions more closely.
Minjnesota, still recovering
from the onslaught of more than
1,504) mothers on Mother's Day,
is now preparing itsef for the
38th Annual Engineers' Day and
the 25th Annual Agricultural
Royal Day. Two thousand en-
gineers will have a holiday while
their counterparts in the Agri-
cultural College also engage in
festivities. With all this gaiety,
campus politicians were engaged
in the grim business of planning
a Mock Political Convention.
Competition for the state delega-
tion chairmanships was very
keen.
Iowa gets the week's four bells for
being the first school to schedule
special events for the Summer Ses-
sion. Plans are already being made
for many events. The Second Art
Fe:,ihal with purely local talent will
be open to summer students from
July 14-18. Drama, music and art
will be featured. Previous to this a
fcrum on current affairs will begin
on June 14.
Theta Xi's Triumph
In Fraternity Sing
(Continued from Page 1)
Chi Omega's vocalizing was ac-
claimed as most spirited by John
DeVine, '41, secretary-treasurer of
the Interfraternity Council, sponsor
of the Sing. The Chi Omegas were
given flowers by Nielsen's green-
houses for the best cheering, while
Collegiate Sorosis and Alphi Omi-
cron Pi shared the Nielsen award as
backers of the Theta Xis.
Cups were given the three winning
fraternities for permanent posses-
sion by Van Boven, Inc., the Milk
Dealers' Association of Ann Arbor
and the Burr, Patterson and Auld
Company. The rotating Balfour tro-
phy went to the winners of first
place until next year's Sing.

Daily at 2-4-7-9 P.M.
IStarting Today!

German House
Arrangem ents
Are Completed
Summer Center To Offer
Opportunity For Study
Of Language, Culture
Opportunity for studying and ab-
sorbing German language and culture
will' be afforded to summer school
students of German by living in the
summer Deutsches Haus, a German
language center, Dr. Otto Graf, di-
rector, announced last night.
The center's social director will be
Mrs. Ruth L. Wendt, present lan-
guage counsellor of the University
women's residence halls, and world
expreienced traveler and linguist.
The Deutsches Haus as in previous
years will take over one of the cam-
pus fraternity houses for the sum-
mer. It will be the center of an
extra-curricular program which will
supplant the work in the German
classes. The center offers an oppor-
tun ty for students to perfect them-
selv(s in the language and to come
in contact with the culture.
The German Department, sponsor
of this project, has arranged through
the Dean of Students and the Dean
of Women to have living accommo-
dations for men and dining facilities
for both men and women in the
Deutsches Haus. Faculty and gradu-
ate students will assist Mrs. Wendt in
directing the conversations at the
meals, the social program, lectures,
music halls, picnic and dramatic ac-
tivities. German is to be the language
of the center as much as possible.
Suomi Club To imeet
The Suomi Club, organization for
students of Finnish extraction, will
meet at 7:30 p.m. today at Lane
Hall. A wiener roast will be held
at Three Islands.
In case of inclement weather, the
meeting will be held at Lane Mall,
accordeng to oivo Liimatainen, '4iE,
presid'ent of the club.

Technic Urges
Lighting Study
By Engineers
Continuing their drive to improve
lighting facilities in the University,
the Michigan Technic, which was is-
sued Wednesday, contained an edi-
torial advocating a complete study
of campus lighting facilities by an
illumination engineer.
Only in that way, the Technic
noted, can steps be taken to solve
the individual problems in the dif-
ferent University buildings.
Criticizing again Michigan's light-
ing. the Technic praised the move in
the "right direction" made by the
University in improving the lighting
in the first floor study hall of the
main library.
"Unfortunately," the editorial de-
clared, "steps like the above will win
no races for the older buildings as
it is impossible for cables (such as
are in the West Engineering build-
ing) to carry one watt more of elec-
tric power than they are now pass-
ing."
City Tax Levy Cut
A city tax levy which is expected to
be 12,000 dollars less than last year
and mean that the tax rate of Ann
Arbor will be at its lowest since 1921
has been approved by the aldermen
acting as a committee of the whole
and will be submitted to the city
council for adoption Monday night.
Caps, Gowns & Hoods
For FACULTY and GRADUATES
Complete Rental and Sales Service
Call and-inspect the nation-
ally advertised line of The
C. E. Ward Company, New
London, Ohio.
All rental items thoroughly
sterilized before each time
used, complete satisfaction
guaranteed. Get our Rental
Rates and Selling Prices.
VAN BOVEN, Inc.
Phone 8911 Nickels Arcade

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UNUSUAL
OCCUPATIONS

-Extra Added
"ISLES OF
THE EAST"

NEWS OF
THE DAY

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MASTERWORKS
by
SZIGETI - KIPNIS - FEUERMANN
GIESEKING - CASADESUS - PETRI - EDDY
CHICAGO AND MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONIES
DON COSSACK CHOIR
BARTLETT AND ROBERTSON
POPULAR RECORDINGS
by
31LNNY GOODMAN-KAY KYSER - GENE KRUPA
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Brought back by popular request
BILL HITTIR

$3 9

and his
1-Piece Band
from DEARBORN
Playing
A Return Engagement
at the
III~IIIT

w Here's a hot weather tip from the dare-devils who "burn

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___!? _t. ...w._.......nt,:.., - - +--L. That. e-Apn their fart rnnl by I

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