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May 12, 1940 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-12

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E

THlE 1M(4IIGAN DAIL.Y

SUNDAY, MAY 12, 1940

w ws UNI)A " Yi . . 1'41

Student Senate Allies Must Stop Nazi Lowland
Hears Warning Drive To W in, EIi rm nn ays
From Smithies ByJAY McCORMICK i his Api i into Denmark and Nor -

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iN

iT

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Economics Professor Says
Civil Liberties Must Be
Preserved By Sltidents
Students should turn their eyes, in
these times of war, to ;ie problems
confronting democracy on campus,
Prof. Arthur Smithies of the econom-
ics department maintained yesterday
in the Union at the semi-annual
Student Senate luncheon.-
The main problem facing students1
today, according to Professor Smith-1
ies, is one of civil liberties. Racial3
and religious prejudices evidenced on
campus should be fought, he con-!
tinued, stressing the point that as1
war comes closer there is more of a
tendency to gag political minorities.
Blakeman Gets Gift1
Robert Reid, '40, new president of
the Senate, presented a gift to Dr.t
Edward Blakeman, counselor in re-i
ligious education, on behalf of thec
group.I
James Duesenberry of the ecanom-
ics department, retiring speaker of
the Senate, was presented a StudentE
Senate pin. He explained that if thex
Senate wants to be bigger and better1
it must work tirelessly and thank-1
lessly. "The one big success" of the1
Senate, he stated, has been the parley
plan.E
Riechard Condemns Fatalism t
Hugo Reichard, Grad., vice-presi-1
dent of the Senate, condemned the
prevalent fatalism on the part of the
students concerning the war. "Some
of us," he said, "are beginning to
resemble summer soldiers and sun-
shine patriots."
Reichard explained that events are
moving faster in this war than in the_
last. Roosevelt has broken the silence
in a most ingenious way," he main-
tained, referring to the President's
message before the Scientific Con-
gress Friday as the "smooth, calcu-
lating phrasing we've been waiting
for" to send America down the road
to war.

"The war can very well be lost by way.
Britain and France in the next few The technique which Germany has
days," Prof. Howard M. Ehrmann of employed, the lessons she has learned
the history department said last night as she has gone ahead in her pro-
discussing Germany's latest move in-graand the thoroughly weak struc-

to Holland, Belgium and Luxem-
bourg. If the Nazi invasion of these
lowland countries is not stopped and
driven back, the Allies will be in a
very critical situation, Professor Ehr-
mann added.
Possesion of air bases in Holland
and Belgium will enable Nazi bomb-
ers to strike with ease at England,
the British navy, and at shipping in
the English Channel and the North
Sea. Furthermore, Professor Ehr-{
mann said, the occupation of Bel-
gium will place Germany in a stron-
ger position to attempt the turning
of the Maginot Line.
This move into the low countries
has been expected ever since the war
began, Professor Ehrmann pointed
out, owing to the strength of the Mag-
inot and Westwall lines. But the time
of the attack, and vether it would
precede or follow an invasion of Hun-
gary and Rumania was not known.
The Germans have enjoyed a long
series of successes ever since they
reintroduced military service in
March, 1935. Since that time they
have moved ahead, to the reoccu-
pation of the Rhineland in March,
1936, into Austria in March, 1938, the
Sudetenland in September of 1938.
the rest of Czechoslovakia in March,
1939, Poland in September, 1939, and
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 5)

ture of the European state-system
have been responsible for the Nazi
success to date, Pi-ofessor Ehrmann
said. The technique includes spread-
ing dissension within states which
have been marked for the Blitzkrieg.
playing national groups against one
another, utilizing pro-Nazi groups in
such countries, then the Blitzkrieg
itself, sudden but final invasion, with
the aid of motorized troops, mechan-
ized units, and air forces.
Using this lack of internal soli-
darity as an opening wedge, Germany
has succeed in taking Austria, Czecho-
slovakia, Poland, Denmark, and Nor-
way without the opposition that
mitht have been expected, Professor
Ehrmann stated, adding that so far
the news dispatches do not show any
such division of national loyalties in
Holland or Belgium in the face of
the latest invasion.
Hillel Program
Honors Ruthven
Rabbi Feuer Will Speak
On The 'Modern Jew'
President Alexander G. Ruthven
will be the honored guest and Rabbi
Leon Feuer of Toledo the principal
speaker at Hillel's Bar Mitzvah ban-
quet, commemorating the thirteenth
anniversary of the Hillel Founda-
tion on the Michigan campus at 6:30
p.m. Sunday at the Michigan Union.
Rabbi Feuer, president of the To-
ledo B'nai B'rith and of the Jewish
Community Council of Toledo, will
speak on "What is a Modern Jew?"
President Ruthven and Kenneth
Morgan, director of the Student Re-
ligious Association, will deliver short
addresses.
Samuel Grant, '40, will serve as
toastmaster during the ceremonies
which will also feature the installa-
tion of new officers and the presen-
tation of awards for outstanding
achievement during the past year.
Hillel Keys will be awarded to 24
junicrs and seniors who have done
outstanding work at the Foundation,
and the winner of a $150 scholar-
ship, given by the B'nai B'rith Wo-
men's Auxiliary of Detroit, will be
announced.

FIRST SPOT PICTURE OF HAVOC OF TOTAL WAR-Furiously burning after a German bombing attack, these buildings on the outskirts
of Schiphol Airdrome, at the south edge of Amsterdam, Holland's larges t city, are shown as their f lames bespeke results of Hitler's total war. This
exclusive picture, the first spot picture on the triple blitzkrieg into the Iow countries, was sent by telephone from Amsterdam to London and then
by radio to New York.

7:30: Women's League Chapel.
First Church of Christ, Scientist:
Sunday morning service at 10:30.
Subject: "Adam and Fallen Man."
Sunday school at 11:45.
Trinity Lutheran Church will hold
confirmation services at 10:30 a.m.
May 12. Sermon entitled "Confirm-
ation-A Door Opened Which No Man
Can Shut."

Stason, Simes To Attend
American Law Institute
Dean, E. Blythe Stason and Prof.
Louis M. Simes, both of the Law
School will attend the annual Ameri-
can Law Institute as the delegates of
the University May 14 in Washing-
ton, D.C.
Dean Stason will go to New York
City following the Institute, where he
will address the annual meeting of
the University of .ichigan Law Soci-
ety.
SEN IORS!
Phone Your
CAP and GOWN
ORDERS
at once
Moe's Sport Shops
6915 7296

c
1
f

Zion Lutheran Church: Sermon
ntitled "Pentecostal Blessings" at
Confirmation services at 10:30 a.m.,'
May 12.
Lutheran Student Association: All,

Norfh Sea
GREAT
BRITAIN NETHERLANDS
AMSTERDAM
THE HAGUE
ROTTERDAM
510,,
%4, tLUXEt B L EIC~
SV E RDU N
Q 5
ARe NANCY
STRASBOURG
NARTRANCUGE
F R A N ,C E COL MAR*
0 50 100
'j Miles SWITZERLAN
1914 REPEATED, WITH VARIATIONS-Here at a glance is the
geographical and tactical contrast between Germany's invasion of
Belgium in 1914, and the Nazi invasion of the lowland countries in
1940. Light arrows indicate the path of the 1914 sweep through Bel-
gium. Pianes and parachutes symbolize the tactics employed by the
Hitler forces to swoop down on Holland's major cities, resulting in
battle in the h:=art of Rotterdam, over Belgium and Eastern France.
Numbers roint to major areas in Germany's land push westward: 1-
into Holland where the Rhine enters The Netherlands; 2-into Lim-
berg, a province of Holland; 3-into eastern Belgium, and, 4-into
Luxembourg.

students meet at Parish hall at 5:30 - --
p.m. Sunday for an outdoor meet- Riegel And Stud
ing.
The Ann Arbor Meeting of the Attend World's
Society of Friends will hold a meeting
for worship in the Upper Room at Prof. John W. Riegel, dire
Lane Hall, 5:00-6:00, Sunday after- the Bureau of Industrial Re
noon. J. Olcutt Sanders of the Frederick L. Shands, '40E;
American Friends Service Commit- Reifman, '40, and William D.
tee will speak in a discussion meet- '40BAd., recently returned fr
ing, 6:00-7:00, about his work with York City, where they atten
are interested are cordially invited. Forum of Youth and Industr:
are inerested are cordially invited. World's Fair as the guests
General Motors Corporation.
The Michigan Christian Fellowship Present at the banquet whi(
will hold its regular Sunday fellow- lighted the Forum were Gen
ship meeting this afternoon at 4:30 S. Johnson, Dr. Carl Compt
in Lane Hall. Please consult bulletin Liam Knudsen, Charles F.
board for the proper room. All stu- ing, Alfred P. Sloan, Jr., and
dents are welcome. Fadiman.

ents
Fair
ector of
elations;
Alfred
Knight,
om New
ded the
"y at the
of the
ch high-
n. Hugh
on, Wil-
Ketter-
Clifton

BABSON NAMED PROHIBITION NOMINEE-Roger W. Babson
(center), of Massachusetts,, a recent convert to the prohibition move-
ment, wa3 nominated as Prohibition Party presidential nominee, as the
pa rty held its national convention in Chicago. The business statistician
will have as vice-presidential running mate Edgar V. Moorman, of
Quincy, Ill. Here Babson is shown as he was escorted to the speaking
platform by Fred E. Britten (left), of Florida, and George L. Thomp-
son (right) of Massachusetts, state chairmen.

It's Extravagance to pay more-
no economy to pay less.
STUDENT AGENCY
DRY CLEANING
1209-A SOUTH U.
PHONE 9088
PICK UP AND DELIVERY
Suits and dresses 75c
CASH AND CARRY
Suits and dresses 69c

MAN OF WORDS-Here is a
good expression shot of outspoken
Harold Ickes, Secretary of the In-
terior, expressing himself at a
meeting of Democratic women in
Washington.

GERMANS BOMB AMSTERDAM AIRPORT-G erman air raiders heavily bombed Amsterdam's air-
port at Schiphol (above), the the Nazis unleashed tr iple blitzkriegs against Holland, as well as Belgium and
Luxembourg. The Germans were reported to have b een blocked from landing at Amsterdam's airport by
a screening barrage of anti-aircraft fire.

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