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May 09, 1940 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-09

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F IGT

"Il E MIJCHA;N D AILY

TIIURSDAY, MAY 9, 1940

. ................ . ..

SRA Director
Speaks Mond Iy
On Cooperatives
M(" ing For All fltVreSte'(
WVi1l Be lielil At Uiioh;
St udea Plans Featured
Kenneth Morgan, director of the
Student Religious Association, will be
featured speaker at an open meet-
ing to be held at 4 p.m., Monday at
the Unicn for all those interested in
student cooperatives.
William H. Rockwell, '41, a mem-
ber of the Brandeis Cooperative
House, and June Harris, '40, a mem-
ber of the Alice Freeman Palmer
Cooperative House, will also speak.
Rockwell will describe the life and
purposes of a men's cooperative and
Miss Harris will explain the privileges
and responsibilties of living in a wo-
men's cooperative house.
The meeting, designed to acquaint
students with the campus coopera-
tives, is primarly planned to explain
cooperatives to those interested in
living or boarding at a cooperative
next semester. It is the first large
meeting sponsored by the newly-or-
ganized Inter-Cooperative Council.
Graduates To Live
In isdale House
Graduate and professional students
may apply for rooming accommoda-
tions in Hinsdale House of the East
Quadrangle for the coming year,
Prof. Karl Litzenberg, director of
residence halls, announced yester-
day.
The article appearing in The Daily
yesterday erroneously stated that
graduate students would not be eli-
gible to live in the Residence Halls.
Fraternity members and men al-
ready pledged are not eligible to live
in Residence Halls according to a
ruling made in response to a request
of the Interfraternity Council. Ex-
ceptions may possibly be made in
cases where a fraternity house is full.

City Editor

Editorial Director

'Ensian Editor .. .

0 .. Manager

Gargoyle Editor...

. . . Manager

PAUL M. CHANDLER ALVIN SARASOHN CHARLES B. SAMUELS JOItN W. CORY

DAVID DONALDSON PATT TJ4rxnW

Cn Win
Aids Roosevelt
Third Term Supporters
Gain Confidence
WASHINGTON, May 8. -(P)-
Third term supporters regarded
President Roosevelt's sweep in Cal-
ifornia today as corroboratory evi-
dence of what they have been say-
ing for weeks--that the nomination,
is automatically his, if he will take
it.
Added to the third term triumphs
in Illinois and Wisconsin and the
support of many party leaders else-
where, they saw it, at least, as
strengthening Mr. Roosevelt's abil-
ity to choose the party's candidate,
if he does not run himself.
The election gave' a slate of dele-
gates pledged to Mr. Roosevelt's re-
nomination a lead of nearly three to
one over the combined ballots cast
for three other tickets. One of these,

pledged to Vice President Garner, term. They presented it to Mr. of his Administration by their Statej
lost by more than six to one. Roosevelt. convention and the instruction of
With everything still depending "He simply read it," Gov. E. D. its delegation for Secretary Wallace.
upon the President's decision to run Rivers told reporters. "We didn't ask Wallace has strongly urged a third
or not, Washington saw that ques- him for any action or comment. We term.
tion put squarely up to him, but told him in advance we didn't ex- "The Presidrent did not make atty
under circumstances which required pect any." commitmenit," Sen. Gillette (Dem.-
no answer. He made none. And, a short while later, an Iowa Ia.) said afterward.
Party leaders from Georgia called delegation visited the Chief Execu
at the White House with a resolution tive. They presented a request from The University of Wisconsin was
adopted by the entire delegation 70 Iowa Democratic leaders that Mr. the first American college to have
pledging their support for a third Roosevelt approve an endorsement courses in Scandinavian languages.

Dewey For President
ooi Starts In State
LANSING, May 8. -(P)- Michi-
gan supporters of Thomas E. Dewey
formed an organization today de-
signed to swing the state's delegation
to' the Republican National Conven-
tion to the New York prosecutor's
Presidential bandwagon if a first-
ballot test indicates the cause of U.S.'

Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg is
lost.
Chairman Melville B. McPherson
of the State Tax Commission, a vet-
eran Kent County Republican, heads
the executive committee created dur-
ing a rally today as a nucleus for the
Dewey organization. The committee
is charged with furthering the selec-
tion of national convention delegates
who will accept Dewey as their sec-
ond choice among Republican Presi-
dential aspirants.

l

.. bombers, but no bombs

w

11ANDY SEaVICE
DiarcTORY

How America got the news of
Norway's Benedict Arnolds

IHiidy Service
Advertising
Rates
Cash Rates
1'c per rea ding iInc fe r one or
two ins eriion5.
10e per reading line for three
or more insertions.'
Charge Rates
15c pei rea ding line for one or
two insertions.
13c per readng line for three
or more insertions.
Five avrerage~ words to :a reading
line. Minimum of three lines per
insertion.
CONTRACT RATES ON REQUEST
Our want=Ad visor will be de-
lighted to assist you in composing
your ad. Dial 23-24-1 or stop at
the Michigan Daily Business Office,
420 Maynard Street.
STRAYED, LOST, FOUND--i
A TAN Doxter gabardine raincoat.
Finder please call Calcutt-Phone
2-1196.
LO'T Ci old Lady lBulova between
Mary Lee Shop and Jordan en
Wednesday. Reward. Call 393
Jordan, 2-4561. 421
TYPING- 18
''YPING L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., Phone 5689. 374
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public-excellent work.
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 20
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2--1416'. 34
LAUNDERING -9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16
.. ..__._FOR RENT
TO R7,ENT: Study and bedroom in
private home. Available summer
or fall semester. Location and
rooms ideal for teacher in Univer-
siy. Phone 8726 any evening. 380

HELP WANTED
GJRL WANTED--To work in book-
store. Full time and permanent.
Begirning now or in June. Write
Box 8. 418
ARTICLES FOR SALE-3
RADIO with ear phone attachments
for dea f person. Will not disturb
'ot'hers. Miss Nichols. Phone 8647.
419
FOR SALE--Building sites-4 miles
out. $i00 per acre-gorgeous view
--low taxes. Call owner evenings,
6196. 414
WANT ED-TO BUY---4_
WANTED-A pair of Friday night
May Festival tickets-May 10. 309
Wenley---2-4401. John Colgan.
416
IIGHEST CASH PRICES paid for
- your discarded wearing apparel.
Claud' Brown. 512 S. Main Street.
146
ANY OLD CLOTHING--PAY $5.00
TO $500. SUITS, OVERCOATS,
FURS, MINKS, PERSIAN LAMBS.
DIAMONDS, TYPEWRITERS, &
CASH FOR OLD GOLD. PHONE
SAM 6304. SUNDAY APPOINT-
MENTS PREFERRED. 359
TRANSPORTATION- 21
N SE RFeal Estate Dealers: Run list-
ings of your vacant houses in The
Daily for summer visiting profes-
sors. Dial 23-24-1 for special
ates.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
- MOVING -
STEVENS
INTERSTATE MOVING
We DIeliver In Any Direction
Our Own Vans
410 N. Thayer St. Phone 2-3802
ELSIFOR MOVING
& STORAGE CO.
Local and Long Distance Moving
Storage - Packing - Shipping
Every Load Insured
310 W. Ann Phone 4297

Leland Stowe

O N MONDAY EVENING, April 8, Leland
Stowe--correspondent for the Chicago
Daily News and its syndicate-sat in
Oslo's Grand Hotel talking idly about
Europe's dormant war.
No guns rumbled nearer than the Sylt.
The good burghers of Oslo were safe in
their beds.
At.half past midnight the city heard a
noise like a thousand angry motorists
stalled in a traffic jam-the raucous bel-
lowing of aii- raid sirens.
At 7:45 the next morning, Stowe and
his colleagues, Edmund Stevens of the
Christian Science Monitor and Warren
Irvin of N. B. C., watched Nazi bombers
roar over the trim Norwegian housetops
-not in sky-darkening swarms, but by twos
and threes. No bombs fell. Scarcely a shot
was fired.
By 2 in the afternoon, the incredible
had happened. The tramp of Nazi boots
was echoing through Oslo streets. The
conquerors, marching by threes, made the
thin gray column look longer. People
gaped like yokels on the Fourth of July
at the spectacle of 1500 Germans taking
possession of a city of 256,000--a handful
of invaders so sure of easy conquest that
they had a brass band!
Was this an instance of awesome Nazi
might?... of a little neutral's pathetic un-
preparedness? To the keen mind of Leland
Stowe, sharpened by experience with Eu-
ropean intrigue, familiar with Oslo's de-
fenses, the thing didn't make sense.
Stowe got busy, and began to pick up
the pieces of the most fantastic story of

onced can find their way around. And the
propaganda front ... reactions of the peo-
ple ...an area that takes the shrewdest
kind of reporting.
The din of battle is just an incident in
this war. It is the touch of red with which
a painter brightens a somber canvas. It
means something only when seen against
the rest of the picture.
Just the same, we all love red, so the
newsmen go through hell and high water
to give it to us. And a whole long year ago,
TIME, the Weekly Newsmagazine, began
to paint the background that would give
those flaming stories meaning-in Back-
ground for War, TIME's famous panorama
of Europe on the brink.
In every new issue, TIME changes and
illuminates the shadows behind the crack-
ling, red-hot stories of the week. Stories
from TIME's own big and growing foreign
staff, from the Associated Press, of which
TIME is a member, from the ace corre-
spondents (with enthusiastic credit).
TIME gives the total coverage that total
war demands. TIME unravels the economic
and diplomatic snarl. TIME reconciles con-
flicting stories-weighs one against the
other, knows the sources and the mental
slant of each reporter, comes up with the
composite, clarified answer.
No man knows where the rlext explo-
sion will be and neither does TIME ... But
TIME knows and tells where the TNT is
stored.
It's pretty important to know where we
are in this war. TIME shows you both the
woods and the trees.

. into Oslo led bya band

the war. A story of a small but potent Nor-
wegian war fleet in the harbor whose crews
had been deliberately ordered ashore. A
story of fortresses and anti-aircraft bat-
teries that didn't fire, or fired startlingly
wide of the mark. A story of mines whose
electrical control system had been discon-
nected. A story of a free people infested
through and through with spies, who could
never have crept into key positions with-
out the aid of traitors:
Chauffeured by a fair compatriot with a
smiling comeback to German gallantries,
Stowe escaped to Stockholm and gave the
world the news of Norway's gigantic in-
side job. Another feather in the cap of the
reporter who won the Pulitzer Prize in
1930 ...the 40-year-old man who was told
by a New York newspaper last fall that he
was "too old to cover a war."
* * * .
Take a poll among newsmen for ace cor-
respondent of World War II, and Leland
Stowe's name would probably top the list.
But there would be runners-up ...

and total reporting means manpower. All
told, it takes 10,000 men to report the
holocaust in Europe.
The economic front is everywhere and
all newsmen help to cover it. The corre-
spondent in the dugout, noticing how the
men are fed and clothed. The man in the
capital gathering facts on production. The
traveling thinkman with eye peeled for
slowdown or sabotage. The editors or bu-
reau heads who fit the jigsaw puzzle to-
gether.
Then there is the diplomatic front, a
labyrinth where only the most experi-

RIDE... utside00.0$1 00
RIDEr 999Inside 9 e.75c
S ppr RideIS.'00004$100

This is one of a series of advertisements in which the Editors of TIME hope
to give College Students a clearer picture of the world of news-gathering, news-
writing, and news-reading-and the part TIME plays in helping you to grasp,
measure, and use the history of your lifetime as you live the story of your life.

Lochner of AP and Oechsner of UP,
covering Berlin. Walter Kerr of the N. Y.
Herald Tribune. Columbia Broadcasting's

T1 KrtE

mTLA1r.

- ~ s~

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