100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 07, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY 7, 1940

PAGE TWO TUESDAY, MAY 7, 1940

Carvalho Tells
Of Government
In 'New' Brazil
Lauds New Constitution
And Elective System
In Last Lecture Here
The New Brazilian State was dis-
cussed yesterday afternoon - at the
Rackham Amphitheatre by Dr Carlos
Delgado de Carvalho, prominent
Brazilian geographer and sociologist.
This was the final lecture in a series
of six talks on his country given
here by Dr. Carvalho since April 16.
Denying that President Vargas
represented any European ideology
of government, Dr. Carvalho said
that through the government in power
since the revolution of 1930, and
through discretion and foresight on
the part of Brazil's chief executive,
Brazil has made a step toward the
solution of her political, social and
economic problems.
The modern Brazilian constitution
represents a form of correction on
the constitutions which existed before
1937, Dr. Carvalho said. All previous
distortions of existing constitutions
were taken into consideration and
avoided by President Vargas when
the present document was drawn up.
Flaws in the Imperial Constitution,'
which was used for 65 years in Bra-
zil, and in the Republican Constitu-
tion, which was used for 40 years,
were mainly in an uncertain and
varying balance of power between
federal and state governments, the
lecturer said.
Even the post-revolutionary con-
stitution drawn upin 1930-1931 was
not without faults, Dr. Carvalho
said, for the many parties which
had combined to effect the change
coud not agree, and inserted unnec-
essary points in the document. The
real beginning of modern Brazil came
when the Constitution of 1937 was
passed, eliminating most of the' faults
of the others by changes in the gov-
ernmental set up, Dr. Carvalho con-
cluded.

Reasons For Students' Entrance Fall Advisers
In University Revealed By Poll, For Orientation

/

DAILY

OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

Student reasons for entering and
remaining at the University are re-
vealed in results of a poll taken in
January, 1939, and released recent-
ly in connection with the Spring
Parley by the Bureau of Student
Opinion at Lane Hall. Figures show
that original reasons for entering
and those for remaining continue to
be almost the same, at least so far
as the leading reasons are concerned,
James Vicary, '40, director of the
Bureau, pointed out. Professional
or vocational training accounts for
56 per cent of a sample group of 594
entering school here, and when asked
in another question why they re-
mained, 54 per cent gave the same
reason.
Second and third answers to the
questions as to why students entered
and why they remained, were also
quite similar, 45 per cent entering
and 42 per cent remaining to get a
University degree, and 38 per cent
entering and 40 per cent remaining
to pursue their major interests.
Asked if they thought their prepar-
ation before beginning their college
careers was adequate, 65 per cent
of the students on this poll answered
that they did. Even more favorable
were the- answers to a question as to
whether their experience thus far at
the University justified the expecta-
tions they had when they entered,
75 per cent saying that they had.
As to methods of teaching and
study, figures on this poll reveal sev-
eral interesting facts, Vicary said.
Asked if they thought independent
reading and research helped or hin-
dered their careers here, 82 per cent
McDowell To Address
Alumni Club At Toledo
Prof. Robert H. McDowell, re-
search associate of Newberry Muse-
um, will -address the spring meeting
of the University of Michigan Club
of Toledo Wednesday night.
Robert O. Morgan, assistant sec-j
retary of the Alumni Association,
will accompany him to Toledo.

said they thought it helped, and only
3 per cent said that it hindered. The
lecture system was upheld by 58 per
cent and opposed by 16 per cent,
while the major or department sys-
tem was said to help by 50 per cent
and considered a hindrance by 17
per cent.
Other figures show that 49 per
cent of the group polled were in favor
of term papers, while 24 per cent
thought they were hindrances. On
final examiantions, opinions were
divided a little more evenly, for 39
per cent of the students thought
them aids and 36 per cent sf id they
hindered.
Hillel Plans Swing
Concert To Bolster
United Relief Fund
As part of the United Jewish Ap-
peal drive which is being held in
Ann Arbor until Friday, Philip Dia-
mond of the German department will
present a swing concert at 8 p.m. to-
day in the Hillel Foundation.
The money received from the sale
of tickets will be turned over to the
Ann Arbor Jewish Committee, local
relief agency.
In his concert Mr. Diamond will
trace the development of the more
modern type of music by playing a
number of selected records of such
noted musicians as Benny Goodman,
Tommy Dorsay, Red Nichols and Bix
Beiderbecke.
All of the funds received by the
A.A.J.C. will be given to the U.J.A.
which will in turn give them to the
Joint Distribution Qommittee, the
United Palestine Appeal and the Na-
tional Refugee Service.
The duties of these groups are to
care for those in need in the Euro-
pean War areas, help them leave the
continent and go to Palestine and
others nations who will give them
admittance and help them maintain
themselves in the lands they go to.

Are Announced
Program For Freshman
Is Scheduled To Begin
Monday, September 23
(Continued from Page 1) 1
ton Miller '42, Donald Stevenson '42,
Tilden Batchelder '42, Winston Cox
'42, Robert Crane '41, Howard Ids-
eon '42, Alfred Darling '42, Ronald
Godbout '42, Basil Edwards '41, How-
ard Eddy '42, John Larson '42, Paul
Sampson '41. Gordon Critchell '42,
Kenneth Calder '41, Joseph Reed '42,
Neal Seegert '41. William Osborn '41,.
J. Paul Smith '41, Earll Radley '41,
George Shepard '41, William Harrel-
son '42, Richard Ludwig '42.
Freshman advisers in the archi-
tecture school are: Ralph Peterson
41A, William Harrison '41A. For the
School of Music they are: Gordon
Hardy '41SM, Philip Malpas '41M.
Engineering school advisers are:
Henry Fielding '42E, Robert Wallace
'42E, Jack Harwood 41E, Jerome
Brenner '42E, Robert Summerhays
'42E, Stanton Allen '42E, William
Schomburg '42E, Ray Allen '41E, Jack
Cooney '41E, George Weesner '41E,
Scott Ulrey '42E, Arlie Reagan '42E,
George Hogg '41E, Frederick Walter
'41E, Lowell Moss '41E, Keith Bron-
son '41E, Robert Hotchkiss '42E, Rich-
ard Bennett '41E, William Downer
'42E, Theo Sharpe '43E.
Student advisers for literary school
transfer students are: William Ses-
sions '41, Thomas Armstrong '41,
William Stuck '41, Henry Brown '41,
Robert Marks '41, Jack Grady '42,
Henry Watson '41. William Hastie
'41, Robert Ulmer '41, George Cornell
'41, Michael Berman '42, Harold
Singer '41, Warren Solovich '42,
Frank Collins '42, Joseph Edelman
'42, Joseph House '41, James Krieger
'41, Gordon Messner '43 and Gerald
Goldstein '42.
Engineering transfer student ad-
visers are: David Shore '41E, Vern
Kennedy '42E, Richard Ebbets '42E,
Robert Morrison 41E, Robert Imbo-
den '42E, James Edmunds '43E, and
Charles Trick '43E.
Forestry school advisers are Walter
Cofnok 41F&C, and Bernard Tau-
ber '41F&C. Only architecture
transfer adviser is Phelps Hines '42A.
Neil Smith, '41Ed is the education
school transfer adviser. Music school,
advisers are Forrest Bartlett '41SM
and Edward Ostroski '42SM. Dental
school advisers are Thomas Hanson
'43D and Jackson Bates '41D.
McAllister Given
Philosophy Award
Winston K. McAllister, Grad, has
been awarded a $1,000 fellowship by
the Rosenwald Foundation, an organ-
ization devoted to the advancement
of Negro education.
McAllister, who did his undergrad-
uate work at Talladega College in
Alabama, has an M.A. degree in phil-
osophy and the Rosenwald grant will
enable him to complete the require-
ments for a Ph.D. degree. He intends
to continue his studies at the Uni-
versity.

--

TUESDAY, MAY 7, 1940
VOL. L. No. 156
Notices

1

Student Tea: President and Mrs.
Ruthven will be at home to students
Wednesday afternoon, May 8, from
4 to 6 o'clock.
Note to Seniors, June Graduates,
and Graduate Students: Please file
application for degrees or any special
certificates (i.e. Geology Certificate,
Journalism Certificate, etc.) at once
if you expect to receive a degree or
certificate at Commencement in
June. We cannot guarantee that the
University will confer a degree or cer-
tificate at Commencement upon any
student who fails to file such applica-
tion before the close of business on
Wednesday, May 15. If application
is received later than May 15, your
degree or certificate may not be
awarded until next fall.
If you have not already done so,
candidates for degrees or certificates
may fill out cards at once at office
of the secretary or recorder of their
own school or college (students en-
rolled in the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts, College of
Architecture and Design, School of
Music, School of Education, and
School of Forestry and Conservation,
please note that application blanks
may be obtained and filed in the
Registrar's Office, Room 4, Univer-
sity Hall). All applications for the
Teacher's Certificate should be made
at the office of the School of Educa-
tion.
Please do not delay until the last
day, as more than 2,500 diplomas
and certificates must be lettered,
signed, and sealed and we shall be
greatly helped in this work by the
early filing of applications and the
resulting longer period for prepara-
tion. -Shirley W. Smith
First Mortgage Loans: The Uni-
versity has a limited amount of funds
to loan on modern well-located Ann
Arbor residential property. Interest
at current rates. F.H.A. terms avail-

;
t
z
E
f
S
a
a
a
4I
4'
S
.
0
V
p
4
S
yr
V

able. Apply Investment Office, Room
100, South Wing, University Hall.
June Candidates for the Teacher's
Certificate: The Comprehensive ex-
amination in Education will be given
on Saturday, May 18, from 9 to 12
o'clock (and also from 2 to 5 o'clock)
in the auditorium of the University
High School. Students having Sat-
urday morning classes may take the
examination in the afternoon. Print-
ed information regarding the exam-
ination may be secured in the School
of Education office.
School of Education Convocation:
The fifth annual Convocation of un-
dergraduate and graduate students
who are candidates for the Teacher's
'Certificate during the academic year
will be held in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre this afternoon at 4:15 o'clock.
This Convocation is sponsored by
the School of Education; members of
other faculties, students, and the
general public are cordially invited.
Students who are candidates for the
Teacher's Certificate are urged, but
not required, to wear academic cos-
tume. President Ruthven will pre-
side at the Convocation and Dean
Harold Benjamin of the University
of Maryland will give the address.
Commencement Announcements
may be ordered through Friday, May
10, at a table outside of Room 4, UH.
Hours: 9-12, 1:30-3 daily. Please
bring amount to cover purchase. An-
nouncements will be available about
June 1.
May Festival Tickets: A limited
number of tickets for individual May
Festival concerts are available at the
office of the School of Music, May-
nard Street, as follows:
Wednesday evening: $1.50 and
$1.00.
Thursday evening: $1.50 and $1.00.
Friday afternoon: $2.00, $1.50 and
$1.00.
Friday evening is sold out.
Saturday afternoon: $1.50 and
$1.00.
Saturday evening: $1.00.
A limited number of standing room
tickets for all concerts will be on
sale at $1.50 and $1.00 each.

Through Tuesday afternoon in-
quiries for tickets, etc., may be made
at the School of Music office on
Maynard Street. Beginning Wed-
nesday morning, May 8, all inquiries
should be made at the box office in
Hill Auditorium.
Seniors: Interesting and instruc-
tive bulletins are published by the
University of Michigan several times
a year. These bulletins are mailed
to all graduates and former students.
In order that you may receive these,
please see that your correct address
is on file at all times at the Alumni
Catalog Office, University of Michi-
gan. Lunette Hadley, Director.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination of Clyde
Frederick Kohn will be held at 2:00
p.m., Wednesday, May 8, in 211 An-
gell Hall. Mr. Kohn's department of
specialization is Geography. The
title of his thesis is "Distribution of
Population in the Middle Piscataquis
Valley, Maine."
Professor S. D. Dodge, as chairman
of the committee, will conduct the
examination. By direction of the
Executive Board, the chairman has
the privilege of inviting members of
the faculty and advanced doctoral
(Continued on Page 4)

-

I

YALE UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF NURSING
A PROFESSION FOR THE
COLLEGE wOMTAN
An intensive and basic experience in
the various branches of nursing is
offered during the thirty-two months'
course which leads to ..the degree of
MASTER OF NURSING
A Bachelor's degree in arts, science or
philosophy from a 'college of approved
standing is required for admission.
For catalogue and information
address
THE DEAN
YALE SCHOOL of NURSING
New Haven. Connecticut

I

HANDY SERVICE DIRECTORY

Randy Service
Advertising
Rates
Cash Rates
12C per reading line for one or
two insertions.
10c per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Charge Rates
15c per reading line for one 'or
two insertions.
13c per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Five average words to a reading
line. Minimum of three lines per
insertion.
CONTRACT RATES ON REQUEST
Our want-Advisor will be de-
lighted to assist you in composing
your ad. Dial 23-24-1 or stop at
the Michigan Daily Business Office,
420 Maynard Street.
HELP WANTED
ANY young couple interested in
chaperoning a girls' cooperative
next year. Call 2-1454 between
4 and 6. 410
FOR RENT
SUMMER STUDENTS: Rooms from
$1.75 up. Shower baths, inner
spring mattresses. Meals if de-
sired. Phone 2-1196. 1022 Forest
Ave. 405
TO RENT: Study and bedroom in
private home. Available summer
or fall semester. Location and
rooms ideal for teacher in Univer-
sity. Phone 8726 any evening. 380
WANTED - TO RENT -6
STUDENT COUPLE desires to re-
serve furnished apartment for
next fall. Write c/o Box 7, The
Michigan Daily.
WANTED TO RENT: Bachelor
apartment for graduate working
girl, year around basis. One room,
kitchenette, private bath. Unfur-
nished excepting refrigerator and
stove. Painted and cleaned reg-
ularly. Apartment building pre-
ferred. Write Box 4. Mich. Daily.
STRAYED, LOST, FOUND-- 1
LOST-pair of gold rimmed glasses.
Return to 123 No. Thayer. Ph.
9307. ReWard. 415

ARTICLES FOR SALE-3
FOR SALE-Camera-Argus f. 4. 5,
de luxe case, accessories. Good con-
dition. Bargain at $8.50. Phone
2-1627. G. V. Smith. 413
FOR SALE-Building sites-4 miles
out. $100 per acre-gorgeous view
-low taxes. Call owner evenings,
6196. 414
WANTED-TO BUY-4
WANTED-A pair of Friday night
May Festival tickets-May 10. 309
Wenley-2-4401. John Colgan.
416
HIGHEST CASH PRICES paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
ANY OLD CLOTHING-PAY $5.00
TO $500. SUITS, OVERCOATS,
FURS, MINKS, PERSIAN LAMBS,
DIAMONDS, TYPEWRITERS, &
CASH FOR OLD GOLD. PHONE
SAM-6304. SUNDAY APPOINT-
MENTS PREFERRED. 359
TRANSPORTATION -21
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run list-
ings of your vacant houses in The
Daily for summer visiting profes-
sors. Dial 23-24-1 for special
rates.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
- MOVING -
STEVENS,
INTERSTATE MOVING
We Deliver In Any Direction
Our Own Vans
410 N. Thayer St. Phone 2-3802
ELSIFOR MOVING
& STORAGE CO.
Local and Long Distance Moving
Storage - Packing - Shipping
Every Load Insured
310 W. Ann Phone 4297
TYPING-18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public-excellent work.
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 20

TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., Phone 5689. 374
LAUNDERING-9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16
SILVER LAUNDRY
607 Hoover Phone 5594
Free pickups and deliveries
Price List
All articles washed and ironed.
Shirts.......................14
Undershirts ................ .04
Shorts ......................04
Pajama Suits ............... .10
Socks, pair ............ . .... .03
Handkerchiefs .............. .02
Bath Towels ................ .03
All Work Guaranteed
Also special prices on Coed's laun-
dries. All bundles done separately.
No markings. Silks, wools our
specialty. 14

Kappa Kappa Psi
Reveals Winners
Winners in the annual band con-
test sponsored last Sunday in the
League by Kappa Kappa Psi, national
honorary band fraternity, were an-
nounced today.
Jean Jefferies, '43, flutist, took first
place in the solo division, Richard
Baker, Grad.SM., cornetist, Arthur
Hills, '42SM, clarinetist, second and
third places respectively.
Winner of the ensemble division
was the Woodwin Quintet, Clarinet
Quartet second and Trombone Quar-
tet third.
Judges in the contest were Dale
Harris, Mac Carr and Elmer Feather-
ston.
The prize awarded is a gold cup
donated by Prof. William D. Revelli,
conductor of the University Band.
Any student on the campus is eligible
to participate in the yearly event.

1
t
,
r
i
t
,.

sr ~OUT V
Come along for
a lulu of a time
in Honolulu,.with
Deanna and her
two sun-tanned
: suitors!

Beanna
with.KAY
WALTER
PIDI3EON
i WA D

-I

I

SEE
the Great Fire
Green Forest !

SHOWS TODAY 2-4-7-9 P.M.

Starts
"SEE
ALL ITS
SPECTACULAR
WONDERS!

p
se
' ry st s' o yt
Maurce Maeterlinck's
BLUE BRD

The World's News Seen Through
THE CH RISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
An I n for national Daily Neu spa per
1ublished by 'l1 CHIIR 'l \N SCIFNCE I I BI I G SOCIETY

in TECHNICOLOR
S irley Temple . Spring Byington " Nigel
Bruce - Gale Sondergaard . Eddie Collins
Sybil Jason . Jessie Ralph " Helen Ericson

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan