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April 28, 1940 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-04-28

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THE MEi CHf IGr A N D_0A I ,y

IN^V ^PRIL , 1510

I

Richest Ore Lies Unused PhiBeta appa Democratie Essentials
In Brazil, James Says V 111i Exmiiwd lily Seminar
__N icolsoi Speak

_ _ i

(Special to the Daily)
WASHINGTON, D.C., April 27.--
Thirteen billion tons of iron ore,
some of it the richest in the world
lie unexploited on anything but a
small scale in Brazil, Prof. Preston
E. James, University of Michigan
geographer, said last night in a
speech before the dinner meeting
of the Division of Geology and Geog-
raphy of the National Research
Council here. Lying about 400 miles
north of Rio de Janiero, the Itabira
Iron district contains ores richer in
iron and lower in impurities than
the best ores known in Europe and
North America, Professor James stat-
ed, but great distances between the
mines and any large cities, and the
complete lack of a suitable fuel any-
where in the vicinity forestall at-
tempts to make use of these rich
fields.
23 'er Cent Of World Iron Ore
It is estimated that 23 per cent
of the world's iron ore is in Brazil,
but this undeveloped wealth is thus
a matter of international concern,
Professor James pointed out, and
consequently a threat to 'the estab-
lished order in a country in the eco-
nomic, social, and political stage
Brazil is in at present.
Furthermore, he added, domestic
politics have added to the difficulty
of getting the ore to the coast where
it could be shipped abroad, or used
in steel works there. The Itabira
property is in the hands of a Bri-
tish-American syndicate at present,
but construction of a suitable railroad
line to the coast through Rio Doce
valley has been delayed for a long
period of years by indecision and
bickering on all sides. Plan after
plan, commission after commission
have sprung into existence for the
purpose of utilizing these ore fields,
but delay and caution have kept
things at a stand still, Professor James
said. Further opposition is found
in what the geographer referred to as
"misguided patriotism" which does
not wish to see foreign interests ex-
ploiting the mines.
New Developments Since War
Since the World War, Brazil has
made great strides in the develop-
ment of its industries, so much so
that gradually it has cut down on its
imports of manufactured goods of
a variety of kinds, but in spite of
her great stores of iron, the steel
industry has lagged far behind the
others, and today the chief imports
are iron and steel bars, rods, and
machinery, Professor James pointed
out.
Despite a kindly government atti-

I

tude toward the coal interests, and
recent increases in production of
coal locally, the coal owners oppose
Itabira apparently on the basis of a
desire to supply the fuel or at leasts
part of the fuel for the proposed
steel industry, a thing which would
be impossible at present due to the
high cost of producing steel with this
fuel, which cannot be converted into
the highly essential coke needed for
processing steel.
The issue then, Professor James
concluded, is whether Brazil should
seek a rapid material progress, with
resultant dislocations of the economic
structure, or if it should proceed
more slowly, allowing each part of
its economy, by gradual additions
to the total structure, to develop in
pace with the whole. Is it, in other
words, he said, desirable to the Bra-
zilian government to risk the almost
certain changes and new problems
which must of necessity accompany
rapid economic growth?
"The motto on the Brazilian flag
reads 'Order and Progress'," Profes-
sor James said. "Perhaps now Bra-
zil finds, that it should read 'Order
or Progress'."
Skippers .Pipe All
Hands For Opening
Of Sailing Season

i

(Note: This is the third in a series concept but that its economic and
of articles explaining the purposes social manifestations shared equal
Honor Group's First Lady, and scope of the honors program sem- importance.
Alumara and also presenting comments
m Of University othe seminars by those participating Varying reactions to the "Democ-
To Give Initiation Talk in them.) racy" seminar were expressed by the
students enrolled. All of them hoped
In the "Democracy" seminar, con- that future meetings of the group
Newly elected First Lady of the ducted by Prof. Howard B. Calder- could be enlivened by a greater
86,000 who wear the little square wood of the political science depart- amount of stimulating discussion be-
keys of scholarship, Dean Marjorie ment, attention has been centered tween the tutor and the students.
Nicolson of Smith College will ad- upon an attempt to formulate a com- Some of the persons thought that
dress initiates into the ranks of Phi plete definition of the term "democ- there had not been sufficient em-
racy" and to examine critically some phasis on the necessary classical
Beta Kappa at the Initiation Ban- of the essentials of that form of background in political obligations
quet at 6:45 p.m. Thursday in the government. to be found in such books as those
Union. The first semester of the seminart e n s b s h
Dean Nicolson, who received her Was devoted to the definition process,
Bachelor's Degree here in 1914 and as approached both from the theoret-
her Master's in 1918, is the first ical and pragmatic points of view. To C 11 R3fI C S Pit
woman ever to head the national establish the theoretical founda-
scholastic honorary society. While tions, the group read such books as
on the campus she was a member Lindsey's "Essentials of Democracy",
of Chi Omega and participated in Laski's "Democracy in Crisis", Mill's
League activities. "Liberty", and Milton's "Areopagiti-
Born in Yonkers, N. Y., Dean Ni- ca."
colson became a teaching fellow at Pragmatic Bases Studied

by Plato, Aristotle, Montesquieu, and
Hobbe in answer toti ci c
one person pointed out the vari11-
1Ii 1ilr o iieai(frof rivetCing atell Ioll upoh ~It
pr'oblemts of demo1cracyv.
One individual pointed out the
danger and value inherent in the
stress on personal organization of
study. The transition from the regu-
lar class room procedure of prescribed
daily assignments to a program per-
mitting and requiring largely in-
dividual planning of work was seen
to be extremely diffictilt at first
Many persons observed an evi-
dent confusion of aims and or-
ganizational procedures in the
seminar, but expressed the opinion
that this was a natural condition for
a new project like the honors pro-
gram.

ok

I NG

Mainsails were gingerly hoisted to
the masthead and skippers barked out
their orders for the first time yes-
terday afternoon as perfect weather
hailed the opening of the sailing sea-
son for Quarterdeck, naval engin-
eer's honorary society.
Four boats, each carrying a crew
of two, competed for the winner's
flags in the first five heats of this
week's racing. The second five heats
will be run off at 1 p.m. this afternoon
on Whitmore Lake where all these
races are held. This marks the first
of a series of ten dinghy races being
held by Quarterdeck each weekend
to determine the best crew in the
club. Instructions in sailing are to
be given for beginners before the
start of each day's racing.
Fifty five per cent of the students
at Albion College are working their
way through school, wholly or in
part.

Johns Hopkins and at Yale after
leaving the University. She gained
her doctor's degree at Yale. As a
doctor of philosophy she went to
the University of Minnesota to be-
come an instructor in English.
After spending a year of research
abroad under the provisions of a
Guggenheim Award, she became an
associate professor at Smith, and
ten years ago became a full pro-
fessor and dean.
Opera Scenes Feature
S Mimes'Spring Dance
A "second-helping" of this year's
Union Opera, "Four Out of Five,"
will be presented when Mimes, hon-,
orary dramatic fraternity, holds its
spring dance, "Ham-Dram," May 10
in the Union.
Included on the floor show plan-
ned for the occasion will be the
sorority scene, the Mosher-Jordan
scene and several dance numbers
which were part of the Opera. Tomr
Cooke, Spec., composer of the Op-
era's 'theme song, will write a special
song for the dance.
Assisting general chairman Larry
Gubow will be the following com-
mittee chairmen: William R. Con-
rad, '42A, decorations; Richard
Strain, '42, entertainment; Tom
Goodkind, '42, finance; and Charles
Heinen, '41E, and Hervie Haufler,
'41, publicity.

To understand the pragmatic bases
of democracy, each student in the
seminar selected a different democ-
racy for comprehensive study. Fol-
lowing extensive readings each per-
son prepared a long factual paper.
At the beginning of the second
semester the seminar started to de-
termine what such governments as'
England and France considered essen-I
tial in a democracy as seen in their
mandated colonies. First, source ma-
terials were examined, including the
administrati've reports of selected
mandates and the minutes of the
League of Nations mandates com-
mittee.
Next each individual in the group
chose a separate mandate for detailed
study. Among those studied were
French Togoland, the French Cam-
eroons, British Tanganyika, British
Kenya and the British colony of Ni-
geria. Institutional forms, it was
concluded, were considered to be in-
tegral parts of these governed ter-
ritories.
'Industrial Democracy' Now Topic
The seminar has now started the
study of industrial democracy. Read-
ings in such books as Tawney's "Ac-
quisitive Society" and the Webbs'
"Industrial Democracy" have feat-
ured this particular phase of the
program thus far. This topic is re-
garded by the group as especially
pertinent, since it was agreed earlier
in the year that democracy cannot
be considered as a solely political

V4~*
TELECAST RED and PRINCE'SFEATHERforthe
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and gay is a Spring favorite. Wear
CYCLAMEN,"IT'S YOU" and SKY BLUE PINK
with the new pastels. BURNT SUGAR
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Elizabeth Arden Make-Up picture for
Spring. Elizabeth Arden Lipstick, $1.50.

M A K E- UPS
'A
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"Zi;he £iufrry
On State at the head of North University

4

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ENO=="

new Sty4&

Ji4t LA2/LWil

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HANDY SERVICE DIRECTORY

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M; ..
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TYPING-18
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TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
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2-1416. 34
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George Stevens, agent. Phone
nouns and evenings, 2-3802. 410 N.
Thayer St. 3751
LAUNDERING-9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 161
WANTED-TO BUY--

HIGHEST CASH PRICES paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
%NY OLD CLOTHING-PAY $5.00
TO $500. SUITS, OVERCOATS,
FURS, MINKS, PERSIAN LAMBS,
DIAMONDS, TYPEWRITERS, &
CASH FOR OLD GOLD. PHONE
SAM-6304. SUNDAY APPOINT-
MENTS PREFERRED. 359
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED, SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run list-
ings of your vacant houses in The
Daily for summer visiting profes-
sors. Dial 23-24-1 for special
rates.
FOR RENT
SUMMER SCHOOL students room
and board, $8.00 per week. Accom-
modations for 20. 1022 Forest,
Phone 2-1196. 382

STRAYED, LOST, FOUND-I
LOST: Yellow-gold wrist watch with
initials F. M. S. Finder please write
Box 9, Michigan Daily. 381
WANTED-TO RENT-6
WANTED TO RENT: Furnished
house or apartment from Univer-
sity of Michigan faculty member
for summei', by University of Cin-
cinnati faculty couple. No chil-
dren or pets. Reasonable rent. Dr.
V. E. Fehlau, 3439 Morrison Pl.,
Cincinnati, Ohio. 383

Arcker

.1

' \' >\ "Q '

I

Budgets

your Legs

ii
//
j
,;j

BEN THE TAILOR-More
your clothes. Open
122 E. Washington.

money for
evenings.
329

She looks like
a million, yet
lives on a budget.

I.

M E E T M E A T P R E K E T E S

c

a stocking that
fits is a stock-
ing that wears.

TAILO Rid BY iSODALt
rg}Tl GNIE LT

of 1940's

1
I

97C
So she wears
Archer pro-
portioned ho-
siery. And you,
too, can economize
the Archer way.

Palm Beach Formials
IT'S NOT TOO EARLY to begin thinking about
that Summer Formal right now! And when you
think about a Palm Beach White or Evening Formal
remember that Wild and Co. has its most complete
stock of these cool and smart suits that it has ever
had. See these masterpieces of color, coolness and
design today at Wild and Co. remembering that
"New Styles Are First at Wild's."

;I

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Vanilla, Strawberry, Chocolate, Butter Pecan
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Coat

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I

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