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April 27, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-04-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

)Ii

s' Club Convenes

(Continued from Page 1)

ay, several were considered out-
ding by Schoolmaster authori-
In biology, Dr. Max M. Peet of
surgery department in Universi-
lospital revealed that scientists
inexorably progressing toward
ng the source of infantile parly-
Facts already indicate. he said,
the villain is a permeable virus
ring the body through the nerve
le nose and traveling from there
igh the spinal cord to the brain,
victims of the disease, he con-
ed, isolation is tremendously im-
mt to prevent contagion.
rsonality development provided
heme of the business education
erence. Dr. Charles L. Anspach,
dent of Central State Teachers
ge, in emphasizing this point de-
d that "we are producing an in-
lual, not a technician." "Busi-
" he concluded, "is an interplay
ng individuals."
creased emphasis on the student's
,onal problems is, according to
Thrysa W. Amos, dean of wo-
at the University of Pittsburgh,
ay to achieve the democratic

ideal. Speaking before the Confer-
enice cf Deansi of Woraen, Miss Anrios
pointec out that m etal m iaad jut
ment may come in both progressive
and general education. With ade-
quate guidance and direction, she
concluded, individuals so affected
may become better orientated.
In the general science conference,
a prediction of a happy medium be-
tween the extremes of the old con-
servative and new progressive schools
was voiced by Dr. Francis B. Curtis,
head of the University High School
science department. Explaining his
prediction, he said that the purpose
of science education has changed from
the mere transfer of training to the
inculcation of a functional under-
standing of the principles of science.
In this /way only, he concluded, will
students be innoculated with the true
meaning and practice of the scientific
method.
Opposition to ultra-progressivism
in education was revealed in a new
plan explained to the Prench confer-
ence by Miss Lilly Lindqiist of the
National Commission for Cooperative
Curriculum Planning. The plan, she
said, diversifies the student's activi-

ties and molds him on the one hand
ffor demnocratic .living and on the oth-
er for personality enrichment.
.ocial studies and geography dele-
gate heard Dr. Cecorcc r:ivu, form-i
erlyv ofthew Dnivrity(of ds pestj
assert 1 that 7 much of tlc ex}ansion
question in Europe has geographical
location as its base. In proving his
point, he traced the evolution of the
political state and showed how the
question of location affected it.
In the same conference, Prof. James
K. Pollock of the political science de-
partment, reiterated his contention
that a more direct choice of delegates
to national party nominating conven-
tions should be practiced. In addi-j
tion, he concluded, the presidential
campaign period is far too long.
Physics-chemistry-astronomy com-
bined in one conference enabled dele--
gates to hear of plastic silk stockings
that neither snag nor run and glass
frying pans that keep food warmer
for a longer period of time. Other
speakers spoke of the painstaking ex-
actness with which the 200 inch tele-
scope atop Mount ,Palomar 'has to be
mounted and the effects of inter-
ference on sound intensities. Tricks
of static electricity and an explana-
tion of rainbow formation concluded
the session.

Board Of Regents
Acce~ Csh Gifts
((oni i'd trom Page 1)
Prof. W. L. Hebbard, of the econom-
ics department, Prof. A. H. Stockard,
of the zoology-department, Prof. Lars
Thomassen, of the engineering de-
partment, and Prof. Cleo Murtlant,
of the education school.
The following gifts were accepted:
From the Parke-Davis Co. of De-
troit, $600 for the Parke-Davis
Pharmaceutical-Chemistry Research
Grant.
From the Monsanto Chemical Co.
and the Child-Pfizer and Co., Inc.,
$350 each, for research in phenol-
ph'thalein, from July 1, 1940 to June
30, 1941.
From an anonymous donor, $250
to furnish a single patient's room
in the new health service building.
From the Michigan chapter of the
Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion. $42 for the Clements Library
Special Fund.
From Chi Omega sorority, $25 for
the Chi Omega award in sociology.

Protestant Guilds
Leave For Retreat
eNewly eecte oftwer 1 t mnem-
d enL religious grOUps, represented on
the Inter-Guild Council will leave
today for their weekend annual re-
treat at the University Fresh Air
Camp.
More than 50 students of the West-
minster Student Guild, Wesleyan
Guild, Roger Williams Guild, the Dis-
ciples Guild, Lutheran Student Asso-
ciation, Congregational Student Fel-
lowship and the Student Guild of St.
Andrew's Episcopal Church will meet
to consider social service projects, the
sponsorship of lectures, and joint
cooperation.
Plans for the two-day conference
are -directed by Edward Philipson,
'41, Willa Jean Ayers, Hoyt Service,
'41 and Russell Van Celeve, '40E.
Cooperative To Give Tea
Brandeis Cooperative House, 841
East University Ave., will hold a
faculty open house and tea this after-
noon, William Rockwell, '41, an-
rrounced esterday.

I

ON

2o High School Bands 20

will compete' in a
Marching Contest at
YOST FIELD HOUSE
Saturday, April 27

I

7.30 P.M.

25c

Ir

a

r

Be Satisfied With A MICHIGAN DAILY Classified

"

d

FROM NOW ON MRKE EVERY WEEK El

'21 \j

WEEK]

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Whenyou run into a good shot be in a position to take it ... be well stocked up on your photo-
graphic supplies. Get pictures of those things you don't want to forget . . . things your camera
can help you remember.
These last few weeks hold numerous picture possibilities ... picnics, dances, GRADUATION, etc.
Whether you plan to buy a complete outfit, a roll of film, or merely want some expert advice,
we suggest you drop in soon at one of these stores. They are anxious to make each of these con-
cluding school weeks a PICTURE WEEK.

PHOTOGRAPHY
BOOKS

LARGEST DISPLAY

IN THE CITY

a ':,y

try

25c and up
ULRICH'S
ANN ARBOR'S BUSY BOOKSTORE

is To Success

In Photography
Subject Possibilities Great
At The University
Of Michigan

nique, the science and the art in
photography. There's a well-equipped
lab for the course in which the be-
ginner can get a good start.
As a source of spare change to buy
better equipment the camera is a
means to the end. Friends are only
too willing to pay for pleasant candid
shots or for application photos they
may need. The Collegiate Digest pays
well for unusual story-telling pictures.
At least three student publications

offer the better lens wielder a good
chance to take many pictures and to
use good equipment. All three of
them, the Daily, 'Ensian and Gar-
goyle, issue their calls for tryouts
early next semester.
The artistic photographer need
look no further than the Ann Arbor
Camera Club which has much to offer
him. Annually they have an open
exhibit and award the best photog-
raphers. -J.N.F.

Your Headquarters for

\i

PHOTOGRAPHIC

SUPPLIES

NrluJrE
' a~I

Films
Cameras
Developing
All the Photogrdpher's

AGFA FILMS
and PHOTO SUPPLIES

For the undergrad who takes de-
light in reliving the days he spent at
college, there is no better tool than
the camera and, as a matter of fact,
no better college than Michigan. Here,
there is a wide variety of architecture,
from the modern gothic of the Law
Quad to tradition-steeped University
Hall; there are pleasant plains amid
a picturesque Huron River drive and
there are rolling hills in the distance.
Equipment may be modest and can
be purchased reasonably at the local
camera stores. For general outdoor
work a simple Brownie will do-and
a cheap, light or medium yellow filter
will put snap into any picture.
There is no easy road to success.
Bestadvice to the uninitiated is per-
sistent picture snapping -- take your
camera to the picnic, on the Sunday
walk or on the hay ride; snap pic-
tures of the fellows in your house;
the girl friend against billowy clouds
-but above all take loads of pictures.
After playing about outdoors with
an inexpensive model, the true ama-
teur will decide he's missing a lot of
good shots in the classroom, in his
rooming house, at the football game,
or at an informal dance. At this
time, if he's got his heart in photog-
raphy he'll give up a dance or a movie
once in a while or forego a new pair
of slacks he has been eyeing so long
and. get a miniature camera, or some-
thing slightly larger with a fast lens.
Here again the local stores offer good
buys in both new and used equipment.
This spring will test the ability of
any amateur. For those who own
"minnies" with a fast lens (any-
where from f2.9 to 1.5) modern fast
film like Super Pan Press or Super
XJ will make the task in Yost Field
House easy.
He'll find himself faced with a
problem when it comes to finishing
his films if he's a prolific shutter-
snapper and may decide he'd like to
set up his own darkroom. Unfortu-
nately the toilet in his rooming house
is hardly the place and nowhere else
can he have running water. When
a sufficient number of hardened fans
finally bump into the same wall,
they're liable to form a student cam-
era club, one of the campus's greatest

See the new
America's

SPEEDFVX Camera,
1940 dollar vaue

Near This Spring
The
Kodak Vigilant
Junior
is packed with features you'll
like; the large waist level and
eye level finders, the ten point
support construction that in-
sures accurate positioning, and
the handy opening and closing
are only a few.

Needs.

Projection Papers
Developing Kits

Color Films
Chemicals

Revere 8 mm. Cameras and Projectors

1225 South University Phone 3743 for Delivery
For Pictures You'll
Be Proud Of- *-.

STUDENT'S SUPPLY STORE
1111 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

PARAMOUNT PHOTO SERVICE
(WHOLESALE)

620 Models at $8.50 and -11.10

616's at $9*.75 and $12.50

We offer skilled processing of your films.
Our service is available at the following stores:

USE Eastman Kodak

film

SWIFT'S DRUG STORE
WITHAM DRUG STORE
GRATTON DRUG STORE
FISCHER PHARMACY
CAHOW DRUG CO.
KOLANDER DRUG STORE
CRANI)ELL DRUG STORE

CARLSON PHARMACY
UNIVERSITY DRUG STORE

We recommend KODAK VER-
ICHROME FILM for best re-

THE GRAYSTONE

fresh at our counters. Bring
them to us for expert devel'-
oping and printing. These
two services mean "pictures
you'll be proud of."

EBERBACH PHARMACY
MUMMERY DRUG STORE
CRIPPEN DRUG STORE

suits.

i

a ANN ARBOR'S EXCLUSIVE FINISHERS
OF GENUINE PANEL-ART PRINTS

For Home Movies we suggest a
Cine-Kodak "K". It's easy for
beginners and it meets the need

Make Our
Store Your

of any expert. Now,

Only $8.0

AND HOW ABOUT YOUR CAMERA? We have the
latest models at almost any price. Come in and look
around for yourself anytime.
PHOTO SUPPLIES
and GREETING CARDS

U -& 50
Coupled range finder. focusing from 3
feet to infinity. Certified f.5 "Cintor"
lens; shutter speeds from 1/5 to 1/300
second. Uses 35 mm~. movie film.

Camera

Headquarters

Your Photographic Headquarters

ARGUS CAMERAS

-- PHOTO} FINISHING

i

ARGUS CAMERAS - PHOTO FINISHING

I

,

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