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April 18, 1940 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1940

THE MIICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

L-1 i. Al 1

PAGE SEVEN

Foreign Center
Will Hold Open
HouseApril 26
Athletic Events And Folk
Dances Will Be Included
In First Annual Event

View Of University's Imposin g New PIca I're'awrlers

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All Students Invita
Foreign students will join to pre-
sent their first annual Open House
at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 26 at the
Intramural Building under the spon-
sorship of the Inter iationa Center.
With a program designed to ap-
peal to the 6ports fancies of every-
one, this Open House will present
exhibitions, instructions and cham-
pionship matches in 20 different ath-
leti events and will especially feat-
ure folk dances in native costume
by several groups of foreign students.
Tickets for the colorful affair are
free and may be obtained by all stu-
dents, faculty members and towns-
people interested in the activities of
the International Center at the Cen-
ter offices or from any of the mem-
bers of the Center staff. President
Ruthven is expected to attend, ac-
cording to Charlie Ochs, '4Ed, who
is directing the event. -
After the folk dancing which is
scheduled to open the program, there
will be an exhibition basketball game
between the two top teams at the
Center. Following will be an exhi-
bition volleyball match between the
Chinese team, perennial campus
champs, and an international team.
One of the features of the Open
House will be an exhibition of soccer
to be given on a miniature court by
the Turkish students' team, cham-
pions in this sport at the Center.
Coach John Johnstone will direct the
exhibition. The championship match
of the Center in table tennis will be
played.
Sports in the free play period which
will extend until 11 p.m. will in-.
clude swimming, nacatos, paddle-
ball, handball, rotation ping pong,
fencing, code ball, basketball, ten-
nis, wrestling, golf, badminton, table
tennis, small games, boxing, squash,
soccer, volleyball and archery. In-
struction by members of. the I-M
staff will be offered in all these
sports.
Union To Hold
Second Record
Concert Today
Stravinski's "Firebird" Suite and
Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 in C
Minor will be featured on the second
of a series of Union conducted re-
corded concerts, to be given at 4
p.m. today in the Terrace Room.
Yesterday's concert was the first
to be given. They will be continued
through next week, according to
Charles Heinen, '41E, of the execu-
tive staff. If popular, they will be
continued.
The third and final All-Campus
Bridge Tournament, conducted by
the Union, and previously slated for
presentation this week, will be post-
poned, according to Harold Singer,
'41. Postponement was occasioned by
the Ann Arbor City Meet to be given
this week. The Union event was ten-
tatively planned for next week.
The high scoring team for the
three All Campus Tourneys given
during the year, will receive a large
cup to be given for the first time for
this event. The cup is on exhibit
in the Union lobby.
Charles Kerner, '41E, in charge of
the finals of the Intra Campus de-
bates to be held Sunday afternoon,
announced that considerable interest
had been ivinced because of the
secret preparative activities of the
two teams Fletcher Hall and Allen
Rumsey dormitory.
Both teams, Kerner said, had
shown a great deal of originality in
presenting their sides of the ques-
tion during previous brackets, and
all indications are for a heated final
session.

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AND DOLLARS TO DOUUHNUTS you'll guess too
inuch! The ine fabrics, the expert tailoring, the
careful attention to important things like fin-
ished seams, deft stitching . . . details you find

only in higher priced coats. Everything about
these coats looks expensive-yet they are budget-
priced at

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Ne w HeaIth Service Building Offers
Many edicalFacilities To Stdents

$j5.-O

Returning

students "ohed"

"ahed" yesterday as they wandered
through the shining corridors of the
new University Health Service direct-
ly across from the League on 12th
Street after Dr. Warren E. Forsythe,
director, flung open its doors to in-
augurate what has been called "a
new era in health" for 12,000 Michi-
gan students.
Affording three times as much
space as the old building which has
been completely abandoned, the new
Health Service from the exterior ap-
pears as a four-storied building semi-
modern in design and about 200 feet
long and 50 feet wide with a rear
wing.
General Description
Students seeking care at the new
building walk up a short flight of
steps and enter a tastefully furnished
waiting room. On the immediate
right, they obtain their records at a
counter and carry them to the re-I
spective waiting rooms on the firstl
and second floors. The telephonel
number of the Health Service hasl
been changed to 2-4531.
Eleven general physician offices,
each with one large or two small ex-
amination rooms, surround two wait-
ing rooms in the north wing. Three
rooms in this section are resrved for
women physicians.
Elsewhere on the floor can be found
the pharmacy where student prescrip-
tions are filled, the dispensary nurse's
treatment rooms; a lecture room seat-
ing 80; a staff room containing a
small library; the administration of-
fices, and the building telephone
switchboard.
Three stairways lead to the ground
floor. Considerable space on this
level is devoted to the pharmacy for
the manufacture of pharmaceutical
suuplies and allergins. Across the
hall are stored 20 years of inactive
Jackson To Talk
On Work Camps
Quaker work camps will be dis-
cussed by Elmore Jackson, a mem-
ber of the American Friends Service
Committee, in charge of all work
camps in this country, when he speaks
and shows motion pictures at 7:30
p.m. today in IZane Hall, under the
auspices of the Student Religious
Association.
All students interested in attend-
ing the Work Camps this summer
may make appointments at Lane Hall
to be interviewed today by Mr. Jack-
son.
These camps offer an opportunity
for constructive service in America's
distressed areas. Physical labor is
the basis of the summer's experience,
and campers work from six to eight
hours a day on various projects of
value to the community where the
camp is located. These include build-
ing recreational facilities in cities.,
building roads, clearing timber, and I
many other projectsI

student records. These will be avail-
able upstairs by means of a spiral
stairway.
The remainder of the floor consists
of the kitchen, a statistical labora-
tory where all records of research
and routine tabulations will be studi-
ed and filed, an ambulance and de-
livery entrance, and a minimum of
storage space. University storehouses
elsewhere will be also used.
Special Services
Special services such as dermatol-
ogy, basal metabolism, X-ray, oper-
ating rooms, blood tests, allergy, den-
tistry, physical therapy and fleuro-
scopy are available on the second
floor.
Operations on this floor will be
confined to those done under local
anaesthesia. For the most part, they
will be nose and throat operations.
Bed capacity for 60 individuals is
provided on floor three. There are
15 single, 11 double, 5 three bed and
2 four bed rooms. Each room has

without bath. Five combination
shower and bathtubs and one shower
only are available from the corri-
dors.
The north end of the floor pro-
vides for isolation service. Food is
prepared in the kitchen on the ground
floor and sent up by means of dumb-
waiters.
St. Clair Alumni Group
To Hear Professor Aiton
Prof. Arthur S. Aiton of the his-
tory department will speak today on
"The Lost Century in American
History" at a meeting of the newly
organized University of Michigan
Club of St. Clair. Robert 0. Morgan,
assistant secretary of the Alumni As-
sociation, will also attend.
T. Hawley Tapping, general secre-
tary of the Association, will attend
an organizational meeting today of
the University of Michigan Club of

Fine fabrics . . . twill,
gabardine, wool crep
wool plaids.

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Look for femininer
"dress" coats with li
trims, young box
bloused silhouettes.

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ingerie
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In fact, here's a goodc
far less than you expe

pay.

lockers and a complete utility room i Plymouth.
Business School Job Aivision
Finds Positions For raduates

SECOND FLOO

Graduates of the School of Busi-
ness Administration are greatly aid-
ed in finding employment by the
placement service of the School,
Prof. Charles L. Jamison of the
school commented yesterday.
The service is not operated in the
form of a formal bureau, but is
under the direction of Professor
Jamison, who is aided in filing of
data by Miss Dorothy Shapla~nd.
Success of the work, in which vir-
tually every member of the faculty
of the School takes part, he said,
can be atter.ted by the fact that ap-
proximately 80 per cent of thej
members of last year's graduating
class had positions by commence-
ment.
Personal contact with graduates
while they are still studying gives
members of the faculty a knowledge,
of their abilities which is very val-
uable to employers, he continued.
This aids, he said, in securing suit-
able positions for employes land in
filling vacant jobs for employers.
Permanent files are kept on all
graduates, including information as
to numbers of interviews for em-
ployment, records of work done in
the School, places of employment
and salaries when this is volunteer-
ed. A questionnaire is sent to each
alumnus of the School once a year
in order to keep the files up to date,
Professor Jamison said.
The actual placement work is'

made possible largely through in-
quiries by companies which need
trained men, he continued. These
companies send placement men to
most of the large universities in the

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country, he explained,;
cre thus brought into
prospective employers.;
been here so far this
served.
Alumni frequently
School of openings in

and students
contact with
20 men have
year, he ob-
notify the
the field of

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business. Professor Jamison said,
maintaining the School-graduate
contact. Occasionally the School is-
sues "blind" letters canvassing com-
panies for openings, he added.
Of the average graduating class,
said Professor Jamison, approx-
imately 50 per cent will enter execu-
tive training courses of large indus-
trial companies, 15 per cent will be
employed as public accountants and
ten per cent will enter family busi-
nesses. The remainder, he explained,
generally will be employed by banks,
t irs or the government as econ-
osmists, and statisticians or as teach-
ers.
The list of students desiring em-
plo ment so far this year includes
66 names, Professor Jamison said.
Of these, 12 have already accepted
offers of positions, and 17 have not
yet made up their minds about of-
fers received. By the end of the
semester. he concluded, it is likely
that mot of the class will have jobs

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