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March 30, 1940 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-30

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PACT SiX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

>. l l l .liG! C:, ALyi..1

Hillel Eleetion
Coincil Posts
Three-Day Voting Begins
Tomorrow; Polls Set
At Lane Hall And Hillel
Voting for candidates to the Hillel
Council will be held from 2 to 6 p.m.
tomorrow, Monday and Tuesday at
Lane Hall and from 9 a.m. to noon,
1 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 11 p.m. tomor-
row, Monday and Tuesday at the
Foundation, Betty Steinhart, '40, in-'
cumbent president announced yes-
terday.
All Hillel members are eligible: to
vote and are required to bring their
identification cards and affiliate
membership cards to the polls.
Twelve Council members will be
selected in the three-day election,
Miss Steinhart said, with three addi-
tional members being chosen by both
the new and old Councils. The presi-
dent of Avukah, Editor of the Hillel
News and the president of the Hillel
Players are automatically put on the
Council.
Candidates for office include Shir-
ley Altschuler, '43, Helen Bittker, '42,
David Crohn, '43, David Davidson,
Grad., Gerald Davidson, '43, Norma
Ginsberg, '41, Ben-Zion Gotlib, '40
and Betty Grant.
Other contestants for Council posts
are Arnold Horelick, '42, Laura Katz-
enel, '41, Jane Klein, '41, Arelene
Lazansky, '43, Theodore Leibovitz,
'40, Herbert London, '43, Jerome Mec-
klenburger, '40, Anita Newblatt, '41,
and Bettijane Reicher, '42.
Beverly Sadwith, '42, Shirley Sil-
ver, '42, Edith Silverman, '41, William
Simon, '41, Evelyn Sislin, '41, Sidney
Steinhart, '41, Jean Tenofsky, '41,
Shirley Toubus, '41, Marcia Wilk, '41,
and Irving Zeiger, '41, are also in the
race.
Sheridan's 'The Critic'
Finishes Run At League
Play Production will present its
closing performance of Richard Brin-
sley Sheridan's "The Critic" at 8:30
p'.m. today in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.* Some tickets are still avail-
able at the theatre box office in the
League.
"The Critic" is the second of the
great satires on the theatre. It first
appeared in 1779, exaggerating heavy
dramatic tragedy. For many years
afterward it was a standard pro-
duction of English theatre compa-
nies.

Belittles Dewey

RTep. George 11. Tinkham (Rep.-
Mass) who sports the only beard in
Congress, issued a statement at-
tacking Thomas E. Dewey, New
York District Attorney, as "un-
fitted to he the Republican candi-
date for President."
Bridge Front,
ToBe Scene
Of Sex Duel
The "War of the Sexes" will break
out on a new front at 2 p.m. today in
the Union where the women are
scheduled to meet the men in a "He-
She" bridge tournament.
According to Harold Singer, '41,
under whose direction this new
wrinkle in sex warfare is being put
on, the event will attempt to settle,
for at least a day, the age-old ques-
tion of the relative superiority of
male and female.
On the Union's agenda of activities
for the week is Pete Brown's program
of "pure entertainment" which is
slated for tomorrow in the Union.
Aimed at giving the campus a pro-
gram of diversified entertainment in
the slack period, of Sunday after-
noons, the program will present Prof.
Howard M. Ehrmann of the history
department, who will speak on "Fin-
land and Its Problems."
Plans have been made, Brown said,
to bring in speakers from numerous
other fields as well as for the pre-
sentation of other forms of enter-
tainment.

Foreign Center
W iti lid IuIit iO
Indian Nationalist Leader
Mrs. Ammu Swaminadan
Will Lecture Tomorrow
Problems of international educa-
tion will be -discussed at the third
education conference sponsored by
the International Center, to be held
at 2 p.m. today in the Center's
lounge.
The conference will include discus-
sion of the various methods employed
by educational institutions through-
out the world and will deal with
the problems of education that have
arisen from the present world crisis.
Scheduled to participate in the
discussions are students in the Uni-
versity who have been undergrad-
uates at universities in more than 15
different countries. All students in-
terested in international education
are invited to attend.
At 7 p.m. tomorrow, Mrs. Ammu
Swaminadan, noted leader in the
Nationalist Movement in India, will
discuss events in that country and
the general history of the struggle
for freedom by the Indians under
the leadership of Mohandas Gandhi.
At 7:30 p.m. Monday, movies will
be shown of the Magnolia Gardens
and the Cypress Gardens of Charles-
ton. The films are talkies in tech-
nicolor.
The Center's first annual sports
Open House will be held April 26 at
the Intramural Building with both
men and women taking part. For-
eign students at the University will
play off the finals in the tourna-
ments of several sports, exhibitions
of many activities will be conducted
and a program of the folk dances
of several different countries will
be presented.
Tickets for this event are com-
plimentary and will be available to
foreign students, their friends and
others interested in the Center from
April 15 to - 26 at the Center's of-
fices. The Open House is under the
general direction of Charlie Ochs,
'4QEd.
Prof. Pollock To Speak
Prof. James K., Pollock of the po-
litical science department will speak
on the foreign situation tonight at
a meeting of the University of Mich-
igan Club of Ferndale. T. Hawley
Tapping, general secretary of the
Alumni Association, will also attend.

Giant Mt. Palo itiir Teleceope'

By JAY McCORM CK
If Bob Ripley gets stuck for a car-
toon figure at any time in the near
future, he'll do well to check Prof.
Jesse Ormondroyd, of the mechanical
engineering department here. Enough
material for a whole series of start-
ling facts may be found in the story
of the 200-inch telescope which is
being built on Mt. Palomar in Cali-
fornia. Professor Ormondroyd was
in charge of the manufacturing de-
sign, and the actual manufacturing
of the mechanical parts for the tre-
mendous scientific instrument.
Weighing one million pounds, the
giant steel unit will be moved in every
direction desired by scientists, by a
one half horsepower motor. Actually,
Professor Ormondroyd told a meeting
of the American Society of Mechan-
ical Engineers Wednesday night, the
power necessary to rotate the mech-
anism would be that of a 1/165,000th
horsepower motor, due to a new type
of bearing developed to eliminate
friction difficulties rising out of the
great weight supported.
The list of biggest things going into
the new telescope is a startling col-
lection of scientific superlatives. Not
only is the mirror, about 17 feet
wide and 30 inches thick, twice the
size of the present largest telescope
at Mt. Wilson, but it will be support-
ed in its framework by the largest
bearing ever built, a unit measuring
46 feet in diameter, Professor Or-
mondroyd said in his talk.
Furthermore, the professor added,
the whole project of the telescope
was aided, during the 22 years since
the birth of the idea after the Mt.
Wilson telescope was seen to be a suc-
cess in 1918, by more scientists and
Richard P. McKeon,
Chicago Instructor,

t :ginters thani liave workefti (! any
Uther scientific undertaking in his-
ry, l .He described the tremendous
amnount of work which was done long
before any construction, or even the
casting of the giant mirror was start-
ed. A grant by the Rockefeller Foun-
dation of approximately seven million
dollars was none too much for the
costs involved, even though engineers
and astronomers of the entire coun-
try gave their services free to the
v.ork. Three large buildings were
built on the California Tech campus
for use directly and exclusively with
the telescope, Professor Ormondroyd
noted. One contains spectroscopes
and laboratory material connected
with the instrument, another is a
large machine shop to handle the in-
credibly delicate yet massive mech-
anical portion, and another is devoted
:solely to the grinding and polishing
of the large mirror and the other op-
tical material required in Ihe tele-
scope.
Surgeons To Hold
Three Day MWeing
(Continued from Page 1)
will be held at 9:30 a.m. and 2 p.m.
respectively. In the first, Dr. Carl
V. Weller, chairman of the Depart-
ment of Pathology; Dr. Max M. Peet,
Dr. Edgar K. Kahn and Dr. Fenimore
F. Davis of the surgery department;
Dr. Milton S. Goldhamer and Dr.
Arthur C. Curtis of the internal medi-
cine department; Dr. Marvin H. Pol-
lard, secretary of the medical school,
and Dr. Fred J. Hodges, chairman of
the Department of Roentgenology,
will speak.
The afternoon general conference
will take place in the Lecture Hall
of the Rackham Building. Attend-
ing will be Dr. Carl D. Camp of the
neurology department; Dr. Bradley
M. Patten, chairman of the anatomy
department; Dr. Howard B. Lewis,
chairman of the biological chemistry
department and director of the Col-
lege of Pharmacy, and Dr. Louis A.
Newburgh of the Department of In-
ternal Medicine.

p.m. The guest speaker will be Mr.
Philip Slomovitz, editor-in-chief of
the Defroit Jewish Chronicle, who
will discuss the current land prob-
lls in Palest inc. The public is invit-
e( .
The Monday Evening Drama Sec-
iin of the Faculty Women's Club
will meet on Monday, April 1, at 7:30
p.m. in the Michigan Union.
h(Jutrches
First Congregationrl Church: 10:451
a.m. Public worship. Dr. L. A. Parr
will preach on "The Fault, Dear Bru-
tus."
6:00 p.m. Student Fellowship sup-
per, followed by a talk by Mrs. Stan-
ley Mitchell of Betsy Barbour House
on "Do It Rigi"
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church:
Sunday, 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
11:00 a.m. Morning Prayer and Ser-
mon by the Reverend Frederick W.
Leech. 11:00 a.m. Junior Church. 11
a.m. Kindergarten, Harris Hall. 7:00
p.m. Student Meeting in Harris Hall.
Mr. Harold Gray will speak on "How
a Cooperative Works" and will show
moving pictures of Saline Valley
Farms.
Unitarian Church: 11 a.m. "Why I
Am a Unitarian." Eleventh Anniver-
sary sermon by Mr. Marley.
7:30 p.m. Student Panel Discussion.
"Upping that Tuition."
Disciples Guild (Church of Christ):
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship. Rev.
Fred Cowin, Minister.
6:30 p.m. The Disciples Guild will
present Mrs. Rosa Page Welch, Ne-
gro Mezzo-Soprano, Chicago, Ill.,
who will sing and also lead the group

DA iLY OFFICIAL

in sineIn Spirituals. All students
i.at_1 l .ii. -h of Chi-AA. i..( :
,.Illll_ .t ' . C"1 , a1L[ . 1 :U I 11 in i jj
S1111day School at 11:45 a.ln.
First Methodist Church: Morning
Worship Service at 10:40 o'clock. Dr.
William Lyons Phelps will speak on
"The Greatest Sermon in the World."
This is one of the lectures in the Hen-
ry Martin Loud Lecture series.
Stalker Hall: 9:45 a.m. Student
Class at Stalker Hall. Prof. John L.
Brumm will lead the discussion. Wes-
leyan Guild meeting at the Church
at 6 p.m. Supper and fellowship
hour at 7 p.m. Members of the Dra-
ma Club will present the play "The
Great Choice," by Fred Eastman.
The Ann Arbor Meeting of the Re-
ligious Society of Friends (Quakers)
will hold a meeting for worship in the
Upper Room at Lane Hall from 5 to
6 on Sunday. Professor W. R. Hum-
phreys will talk on "The Philosophy
of the Old Testament Prophets" from
G to 7. All interested are invited.
First Presbyterian Church: 10:45
a.m. "Building a Faith" will be the
subject of the sermon by Dr. W. P.
Lemon.
5:30 p.m. Westminster Student
Guild meet for supper and fellowship
hour. At 7 o'clock Miss Anna M.
Scott, secretary for personnel service,
Department of Missionary Operation,
will speak.
Baptist Church: 9:30 Graduate
Bible Class. Prof. LeRoy Waterman,
teacher.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship. Ser-
mon topic, "Ownership of Life."
12:00. Student Round Table. Dis-
cussion topic, "What Can We Be-
lieve About Marriage."
.6:15. Roger William's Guild in the
Guild House, 503 E. Huron. Rabbi
Isaac Rabinowitz will review Solem
Asch's novel, "The Nazarene." The
Roger Williams Guild of Ypsilanti
will be our guests.

Lectures

On 'Logic'

(Continued rrom Page 1)

Pens - Typewriters - Supplies
"Writers Trade With Rider's"
RI DER'S
302 South State St.

HANDY SERVIC DIRECTORY

the distinctive characteristics of vari-
ous philosophers: the dialectic meth-
od of Plato; Aristotle and "conten-
tious reasoning; Agricola's conten-
tion that the syllogism is a mere
manipulation of words; Peter Remus'
dividing logic into judgment and in-
vention (or discovery); Bacon's in-
tensification of that classification of
judgment and discovery; John Stu-
art Mill and inductive reasoning and
Bertrand Russell's statement of first
principles.
Despite the tendency to believe
that logic, in the 17th century, turned
toward inductive reasoning, that
method all but died out until the 19th
century in England," Dr. McKeon
added.
Dean of the Division of Humani-
ties at Chicago since 1935, Dr. Mc-
Keon is famed for his works upon
the general subject of philosophy. He
is author of such books as "The Phil-
osophy of Spinoza" and "Studies in
the History of Idea, Vol. III)."
Adventuhe
in E ating

Handy Service
Advertising
Rates
Cash Rates
12c per. reading line for one or
two insertions.
10c per reading line for three
or more insertions.
Charge Rates
15c per reading line for one or
two insertions.
13c per reading line for tfiree
or more insertions.
Five average words to a reading line.
Minimum of three lines per inser-
tion.
CONTRACT RATES ON REQUEST.
Our Want-Advisor will be delighted
to assist you in composing your ad.
Dial 23-24-1 or stop at the }ichigan
Daily Business Office, 420 Maynard
Street.
FOR RENT
MAN to share desirable suite, $3.
Meals if desired, $4. 1436 Washing-
ton Hgts. Phone 8256. 346
WANTED-TO RENT-6
VISITING faculty member desires
furnished from about June 15 to
August 30. Write, giving partic-
ulars, to N. D. L., care of Michigan
Daily. 348
ARTICLES FOR SALE-3
FOR SALE-Buick coupe, seats 5.
Good condition. $50.00 See it after
4 p.m. at 310 North Thayer. 349
TRANSPORTATION --21
TRANSPORTATION HOME: You
can find a ride home very econom-
ically by inserting a Ride Ad into
The Daily. Find passengers for
your car or seek your ride now.
15 words for 36c. Dial 23-24-1 now!
WASHED SAND AIND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13

WANTED - TO BUY -4
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run list-
ings of your vacant houses in The
Daily for summer visiting profes-
sors. Dial 23-24-1 for ' special
rates.
LAUNDERING-9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16
ACE HAND LAUNDRY-Wants only
one trial to prove we launder your
shirts best. Let our work help you
look neat today. 1114 S. Univer-
sity. 19

MISCELLANEOUS--20
CANARIES: Lovebirds, Finches. Bird
food and cages. Birds boarded. 526
S. Seventh facing Madison. Phone
5330.
STRAYED, LOST, FOUND --1
LOST--Clipboard with notes pro-
tected by a manila cover. Also pair
of pigskin gloves. Reward. Stew
Robson. Phone 2-3297.
TYPING-18
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public, excellent work.
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 20
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34

Sunday,
&ziprr

Service

uI

G~AS tau IMYAGINE?

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ELE5MEWT 1SNYr'EVW4DAMAGED...
A14D 1ilHOUGW 1 14t4 ILE
WOULD ATE RUI EZfr IIISLUCKY~
J'r~ WAS 'ONE POP-mOUT PLUG
TRAT' SNU'VS OV'F Ti4E ELEC-
1'?IC1TY(AUrctr7Ar"ICALLY W
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WI1WW I1PFOUND 17 THlE KE1LE
HAD 1~01LED DRY!

in the
Main
Dining Room
Fried Cornmeal Mush
Grilled Bacon and Syrup
Ice Cream e Wafers
Beverage
50c
Union Special Club Sandwich
Raspberry Sundae
Bev-erage
50c

Russian Goulash, en
Date Torte or Ice
Beverage

Casserole
Cream

I Ii

60c
Essence of Tomato
Grilled Veal Porterhouse Steak
French Fried Potatoes
Lima Beans
Orange Chiffon Pie
Beverage
75c
GOOD FOOD
Excellent Service
6 to 7:30 o'clock
M"A' 14 31 e 190

TYPEWRITING
nnd

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1111

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