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February 16, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, FEB. 16, 1940

PAGE SIX FRIDAY, FEB. 16, 1940

Mellencamp.
Designs Union
Opera Scenery
The campus on canvas is being de-
signed for the sets of the Union
Opera by Robert Mellencamp, instruc-
tor of stage-craft in the speech de-
partment.
Scenes which Mr. Mellencamp has
painted include the diagonal, the
Parrot ,the "stacks" of the General
Library, the Union Ballroom and
rooms of fraternity and sorority
houses.
Mr. Mellencamp describes his back-
drops for the Opera as "recognizable,
but not realistic." Rather than striv-
ing for ultra-realism, he explained
he has sought to give each scene a
humorous, satirical twist.
For example, his picture of the
stacks of the library resembles a
gloomy prison cell as much as it does
a storeroom for books. "This is to
make the setting agree with the script
of the Opera," he said. "In the show
Lee Grant hides Hedy La Tour away
in the stacks."
Mr. Mellencamp, who graduated in
the class of 1938, has designed the
sets for Play Production for two years.
RADIO and
MICHIGAN Cobs
Phones
3030 or 7000
READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

Marley To Talk
On Broun's Life
Columnist's Catholicism
Will Be Considered
Rev. Harold P. Marley will speak
on "The Meaning of Heywood Broun,"
at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Unitarian
Church. 4
His talk is the third in a series of
four contemporary biographical lec-
tures. Reverend Marley will dis-
cuss the question of the role of the
liberal in religion in view of the late
Mr. Broun's association with Catholi-
cism.
Without criticizing the late column-
ist, Reverend Marley will indicate how
much more effective Mr. Broun could
have been if he had identified the
social elements in religion with the
individual urge for perfection.
Reverend Marley will complete the
series Sunday, Feb. 25, with his talk
on "Well Known Congressmen." He
will discuss Senator Norris, the late
Senator Borah and ex-Representative
Maverick.

No Scenery Shifts
In'Julius Caesar,'
Says Mellencamp
A battle, a garden scene and sev-
eral scenes in the Roman Senate will
be enactea in the same setting in
Play Production's forthcoming pre-
sentation of Shakespeare's "Julius
Caesar."
Robert Mellencamp, the group's
scenery director, explained this seem-
ingly impossible "unit setting," and
said that no scenery changes at
all would be made in the play. Such
a setting, he added, is all the more
advantageous in Shakespearian plays,
l as "flowing" speed and little delay
between scenes are essentials for good
presentation.
Shakespearian drama, indeed, he
explained, does not depend on setting,
and adapts itself admirably to the
unit setting.
Mellencamp explained this particu-
lar unit setting as comprising a num-
ber of platforms, levels and stair-
ways. Such a set, he added, is truly
a director's joy, as it facilitates the
emphasis of particular actors at vari-
ous times.
A real Elizabethan play suggests
first the peculiar Elizabethan stage,
Mellencamp observed. However, to
use the scenery director's own words,
"'Julius Caesar' isn't Elizabethan
enough to warrant its special type of
stage."
The play will be given at 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday through Saturday in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, with a
matinee at 2:30 p.m. Saturday. Tick-
ets may be secured at the theatre box
office.

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Summer
Must

Job Applicants
Register Today

Students who wish to register for
summer employment must do so today
at the Bureau of Appointments, 201
Mason Hall, it was announced yester-
day.
There are still several positions
available for which applications bhave
not been made. Registration blanks
may be obtained at the office from
9-12 a.m. and 2-4 p.m.

POPULATION GAINS IN RUMANIA-From Bucharest, Rumania, comes this picture of Papa Nicola Anton and his growing family, posed step'
by step, with Mrs. Marie, 31, holding the newborn boy. Girls are leading their brothers, six to four.

i

HOIPE.-Weght of his 79 years
couldn't oocnv hi the fire with which
Ignace Paderewski cried, "We will
deliver Po!and from capitivity," in
Paris, when the pianist became
president of Poiand's national
council, the parliamenat-in-exile.

RALLY TO BRITAIN'S CALL-While one squad stands at attention men of the Royal Indian army ser-
vice corps and veterinary corps arrive at their camp in France.

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AND BETTER-TASTING
You'll always find these
two qualities at their best, plus a
far cooler smoke, in Chesterfield's
Right Combination of the world's
best cigarette tobaccos.
Make your next pack Chesterfield and
see for yourself why one smoker tells another
They Satisfy. You can't buy a better cigarette.

RISING STAR-Those two masters among jockeys--Eddie Arcaro
and Don Meade-may have to make room soon for this apprentice,
Jackie Flinchum (above), 17, of Miamisburg, Ohio, who's in Miami,
Fla., riding winners at Hialeah track.

THIS'LL TEACH HIM-Booked on charges of disorderly conduct
after he'd disrupted the Fell public school in Philadelphia, this goat
(first name unknown) got five days in jail, much to the sorrow of
House Sgt. eraan Phmillips.

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