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March 24, 1940 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-24

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 1940

Talks Conclude
Parley Series
On Fraternities
Greek Society Relations
With University Heads
Problems Considered
(Continued from Page 1)
tions panel drew up a resolution
which recommended that the Inter-
fraternity Council study a better sys-
tem of presenting the comparative
scholastic averages of the houses,
and that it should, with the aid of
:University statistical advisers, draw
up a report which would be fairer
in their opinion.
Averages of the fraternities are
lower than the campus average, it
was noted, and Prof. Carl G. Brandt,
director of alumni-student relations,
stated that the statistics showing
this create the general feeling that
fraternities lack scholastic interest.
Should Have Ambition
Assistant Dean of Students Walter
B. Rea suggested that there should
be no reason for fraternity averages
to fall below the campus norm, and
said each fraternity should have
ambition enough to even surpass it.
Questions of finance and manage-
ment were considered in the panel
on that subject, and the students
present, along with Fraternity Fi-
nancial Supervisor Robert P. Briggs,
of the economics department and
Homer Heath of the Ann Arbor Trust
Company, took up topics of inter-
fraternity cooperative buying and in-
centives to fraternity members to
meet their bills on time.
Unquestionably A Success
Tom Adams, '40, president of the
Council, said yesterday, at the con-
clusion of the program, that it was
unquestionably very successful and
that many benefits should accrue
from the topics discussed. Moreover,
he pointed out, it was an opportunity
for fraternity men from different
houses to convene and actually ex-
change valuable ideas for remedying
problems. The program will no doubt
be a feature of Council activities in
the future, he concluded.
Tickets Available
For Military Ball
Tickets for Military Ball to be held
April 26 in the Union Ballroom are
still on sale from 4 p.m. to 5 pm.
daily in Room 303, West Engineering
Annex..
Sale of tickets is limited to advance
course students, and will continue un-
til Friday, April 3. The date of ticket
sales for reserve officers and basic
students will be announced later.
The price of the tickets is $3. Only
300 will be sold, Walter E. Clement,
40E, general chairman, announced.

Small Scale Models Are Used
In Testing Construction Designs,

Basic. Structural Problems1
In Engineering Projects
Studied By Prof. Maugh
By KARL KESSLER
Basic principles for the solution
of new structural problems that are
frequently encountered in the recent
trend toward continuity in bridges
and buildings are being analyzed
through the application by small
scale models by Prof. Lawrence C.
Maugh of the civil engineering de-
partment.
The models used by Professor
Maugh are generally of celluloid,
brass or steel, depending upon the
particular problem to which they are
to be applied.
Dimensions Reduced
For maximum faith in correspon-
dence between models and the actual
scructure, all linear dimensions if
possible are reduced by the same
ratio. That is, a half-scale model
would be half as high, wide and long
as its prototype, although the cross-
section area would be only one-fourth
as large. Despite certain inherent geo-
metrical discrepancy, Professor
Maugh has found that a high degree
of correlation in stress tests can be
obtained.
Especial significance has been fo-
Price To Open
Concert Series
Spring Carillon Programs
Begin With Recital Today
The spring series of carillon con-
certs will begin at 4:15 p.m. today
with a recital by Prof. Percival Price,
University Carillonneur.
Professor Price will open with a
group of Flemish folk songs, "I Saw
Cecelia Coming," "In the Winter
When It Rains," "May Planting"
and "The Little Swain. Following
this he will play "Sonata No. 5,"
from "Group Two For Harpsichord"
by Ignace Joseph Pleyel. The three
movements of this selection are "Al-
legro," "Andante" and "Ronde Al-
legro."
The second half of the program
will feature carillon compositions by
Jef Denyn, "Prelude," "Andante can-
tabile" and "Rondo," and "Song To
the Fatherland," from the cantata
"Genius'of the Fatherland" by Peter
Benoit.
As the arrangement of music for
the, carillon is as important as the
original composition, Professor Price
will include in his concerts many
styles of arranging. The music for
this concert was arranged by Denyn,
who is director of the carillon school
in Belgium.

cused upon the use of models in
structural study in recent years be-
cause of the trend in steel construc-
tion work toward a more extensive
use of welded joints.
Structure Now Continuous j
Through the introduction of these
new methods of joining beams and
angles, bridge and building struc-
tures must now be considered as con-
tinuous, not as jointed as was pre-
viously the case when the use of
rivets was prevalent. Continuous
metal structures are now going
through the same stages of develop-
ment followed by concrete several
decades ago when that material was
first studied as a continuous struc-
ture, Professor Maugh believes, and
the similar difficulties, although of'
a somewhat different type, which
confronted the engineer then are
present now in this new medium.
Stress Pattern Formed
By applying pressure to small
models of structures to be analyzed,
stress and deformation patterns are
formed in the model which, to a
high degree of accuracy, correspond
directly to the type and relative size
of those which would result from a
proportionately greater pressure Ap-
plied to the full-scale structure.
Though a particular model may
be employed for a variety of purposes,
three general uses for structural mo-
dels may be distinguished.
Experimental models are, first,
used for the determination and veri-
fication of the basic assumptions and
postulates relating to the study of
structural designing. Secondly, the
use "of elastic deformations of these
small models to determine the stress-
es and strains in complicated struc-
tures too complex to analyze mathe-
matically lends itself to wide applica-
tions once the fundamental relations
between model and prototype are,
known.
Finally, scale models are now wide-
ly used to verifly results obtained
analytically and to show whether
construction problems have been cor-
rectly solved and if the desired re-
sults will be obtained.
Dog Reverts To Type,
Despite Urban Traffic
Natives of bustling Washington,
unaccustomed to such sights, stopped
to gape a couple of days ago at an
intelligent looking dog drawn up to
a full point in the middle of a busy
street.
The explanation proved to be this:
This week was Conservation Week
in Washington. Following the spirit
of the idea, various nearby game
reserves were being restocked. Our
dog had seen (or rather smelled)
a truck loaded with pheasants bound
for the country and, following the
tradition of his ancestors, he had
come to a full point, the speeding
truckssandgautos around him not-
withstanding.
Atmosphere evidently makes no
difference to.,atrue hunting hound!1

How Russian Petroleum Will Flow Into The Reich
0ort00 2E0E30 400 500
Sea DENMARK so .LNIGRAD U. S. S..
s }. '*Kiov Perm v-
S4 Sverdlovsk
CBergin//Moscow Gorki. Kazan}
Z G E R MANY , i CANAL LINKING 4 4a
a asw4 BUG AND PRIPET '
w 1 parsawNEARLY COMPLETE Magntogorsk
W NAP c Samara 4
iev Saratov . U"kOrsk
Budapest alsk
HUN GARY fit 4 1
7?: /V-UI K R A I[ N F . Stalingrad
ITALY RUMANIA Odessa
*Rome 9 Bucharest t
® nC Tuapse tTuaps
BULGARIA0
s CE m-/Black OIL FIELDS
'?etl OIL STORED HERE OPERATION
Ma/ta = s SN TO E U atU EINRE
: DANUBE TO GERMANY aREFINERIES
'° tlBaku
Medierranean Sea I?
C E
~ I N (PERsIA)
Russian oil, much needed by Germany, is expected to flow in greater volume into the Reich as soon is
ice conditions in the Danube River permit. The flow ofoil, which the British admit they have been unable to
stop, starts through pipe lines at Petrovsk and Baku. From Tuapse and Batun, it is shipped in tankers (black
line on this map) for storage at Constanta, thence bey barges down the Danube (arrows). An alternate
route may be provided with the completion of the canal (broken line) linking the Bug and Pripet rivers.

Here Is Today's
In Summary

Ann Arbor

News

Rural customers of the Ann Arbor
exchange of the Michigan Bell Tele-
phone Co. will begin to have dial
telephones in their homes about May
1, and all should have the service by
July 1, according to N. J. Prakken,
local manager.
The work of installation at the
present time has been about half
completed. The switch-over will be
accomplished on a line by line basis.
** *
A telephone call from police
headquarters to state police in
Erie apprehended an assortment
of baby clothes Friday.
Departure of the police from
their usual occupation of cap-
turing criminals came about when
they were phoned by Mrs. Jona-
then Parsons of Kalamazoo and
informed that her husband was
on his way to Virginia by way of
Toledo and was carrying with him
in his car clothes for the baby
which should have been left in
Ann Arbor where Mrs. Parsons is
visiting her mother.
State police in Erie stopped
Parsons as he drove through.
Mrs. Parsons was informed thpo
he will return the clothes.
* * *
Collected against delinquent taxes
on property auctioned at the state
salvage sale ending last Friday was
$193,743, it was reported yesterday.
This amount will be divided among
the state, county, cities, school dis-
tricts and drain districts in propor-
tion to the amount of tax delinquency
claimed by each against the individ-
ual lots.
The city and school board pur-
chased 194 parcels at the sale, 52 of
which were later redeemed by former
owners. The remaining 142 pieces
will go to the city provided the State
Land Office Board approves

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

April 5. Open daily 9 to 5, except

SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 1940
VOL. L No. 127
Notices
Student, College of Engineering:
The final day for removal of incom-
pletes will be Saturday, April 6. Peti-
tions for extension of time must be on
file in the Secretary's Office on or
before Wednesday, March 27.
A. H. Lovell, Secretary
Faculty, College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: Midsemester
reports are due not later than Sat-
urday, April 6. More cards if needed
can be had at my office.
These reports should name those
students, freshman and upperclass,
whose standing at midsemester time
is D or E, not merely those who re-
ceive D or E in so-called midsemester
examinations.
Students electing our courses, but
registered in other schools or colleges
of the University, should be reported
to the school or college in which they
are registered.
E. A. Walter, Assistant Dean
Biological Station: Application for
admission for the coming summer
session should be in my office before
April 15, when all applications will
be considered. An announcement des-
cribing the courses offered can be
obtainedtat the Office of the Summer
Session or from the Director. Ap-
plications should be made on forms

which can be secured at Room 1073,
N.S. from 2 to 4 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
A. H. Stockard, Director
Dormitory Directors, Sorority Cha-
perons and Househeads: Late per-
mission to atteild "Gone With The
Wind" for the evening performances
may be secured from the househeads.
Students should return immediately
after the performance.
All R.O.T.C. Advanced Course Stu-
dents, including Medical Advanced
Course, desiring tickets for the Mili-
tary Ball, to be held April 26, from
10 p.m. until 2 a.m., sign the list on
the bulletin board in R.O.T.C. Head-
quarters.
Tickets preference given to those
signing early.
Academic Notices
Business Administration 4: All stu-
dents who have not received assign-
ments for this course are to make
appointments as soon as possible with
Mr. Meacham.
Exhibitions
Exhibition, College of Architecture
and Design: Photographs of Finnish
architecture, by Ernst L. Schaible,
'37A, Booth Traveling Fellow in Arch-
itecture in 1938. Architectural cor-
ridor, ground floor cases, through

April 5. Open daily 9 to 5, except
Sunday. The public is' invited.
Lectures
University Lecture: Professor Her-
(Continued on Page 4)

K

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PLAY PRODUCTION
Presents
he7/ CLwe

Classified Directory

II

Sheridan's Riotous
Rehearsal Farce

LAUNDERING-9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16

SEE--

i

Sinking of the Spanish Armada
England's rivers and their tributaries.
# What went on at an 18th century play rehearsal.
WEDNESDAY through Saturday, March 27, 28, 29, 3U
Lydia MENDELSSO HN Theatre
Box Office Open Monday - Reserved Seats: 75c, 50c, 35c
Phone 6300 Curtain at 8:30 P.M.

SILVER LAUNDRY
607 Hooifer Phone 5594,
Free pickups and deliveries
Price List
All articles washed and ironed.
Shirts.....................14
Undershirts.................04
Shorts .................... .04
Pajama Suits.................10
Socks, pair ................. .03
Handkerchiefs................02
Bath Towels..................03
All Work Guaranteed
Also special prices on Coed's laun-
dries. All bundles done separately.
No markings. Silks, wools our
specialty. 14

TRANSPORTATiON--21
TRANSPORTATION HOME: You
can find a ride home very econom-
ically by inserting a Ride Ad into
The Daily. Find passengers for
your car or seek your ride now.
15 words for 36c. Dial 23-24-1 now!
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
TYPING--18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
WANTED -TO BUY-- 4
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
MISCELLANEOUS--20
BEN THE TAILOR-More money for
your clothes. Open evenings.
122 E. Washington. 329
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run list-
ings of your vacant houses in The
Daily for summer visiting profes-
sors. Dial 23-24-1 for special
rates.

with

CARMEN COSTILLO
Song Stylist

CHRISTY & GOULD
Thrills -Spills

ON THE SCREEN
BALANCE YOUR FUN BUDGET!
Blondie goes nuts fry-
ing to balance hers!

I.

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ANNOUNCING
THE ANN ARBOR PREMIERE
FRIDAY, MARCH 29th - APRIL 4th
GONE WITH THE WIND
This production will not be shown anywhere except at advanced
prices... at least until 1941
YOU WILL SEE IT HERE EXACTLY AS IT WAS
PRESENTED AT THE ATLANTA PREMIERE.
BUY RESERVED SEATS NOW!
Box Office Open 1 a.m. - 19 p.m.
Good Seats Still Available

STRAYED, LOST, FOUND -1
LOST-A Kappa Alpha Theta pin
belonging to Ann Vicary. Call'
2-2547. Reward.
LOST: A gold Waltham wrist watch
in basement study hall of the gen-
eral library. $5.00 reward. Call
Dave at 6390. 343
LOST-Gray billfold containing val-
uables. Reward if returned intact.
Phone Janet Unruh, 4089 341
LOST-Kappa Alpha Theta Pin,
March 9th. Name on back. Call
Mary Major, 2-4561. Reward. 342

_______Extra
CARTOON - COMEDY
NEWS - NOVELTY

I

m

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F R E
FREE!
Glass of ROOT BEER
TODAY ONLY we are offering this special feature -
a free glass of root beer wtih each I5c sandwich purch-

EVENINGS AT 7:30 P.M.
ALL SEATS RESERVED

SUNDAY MATINEE
2:00 P.M.
ALL SEATS RESERVED

E=

TYPEWRITING JI
and I

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III

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