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March 22, 1940 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-22

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAiLY

FRihAY, MARiH 22, 1940

Sink Announces Guest Faculty
Of Music School Summer Session
Among the otstanding musicians able reputation, President Sink com-
of national repute who will appear as mented yesterday.
guest instructors at the School of Professor Christiansen is a gradu-
Music this summer will be Erik W. ate of St. Olaf's College and has
Leidzen, Prof. Olaf C. Christiansen served as guest director at summer-
and Nazareno DeRubertis, President sessions of the University of Missouri,
Charles A. Sink of the School an- Iowa and Wisconsin.
nounced yesterday. Mr. DeRubertis, who will be in(
Mr. Leidzen, who will spend two charge of the School of Music Sy'i-
weeks here as special guest conduc- phony Orchestra for four weeks dur-
tor, was born in Stockholm where ing the Summer Session, received his
he studied piano, organ, harmony musical education largely in Italy and
and composition at the Royal Acad- France. After touring the world for
emy. He came to America in 1915, a number of years he took up per-
filling many professional positions manent residence in Kansas City, Mo.,
in several branches of music; he was where he founded the Kansas City
chosen head of the theoretical de- Chamber Music Society and the Little
partment of the Ernest -Williams Symphony.
School of Music in Brooklyn. As a composer he has contributedj
For the last six years he has direct- not only to the literature of his own
ed the Swedish Glee Club of Brook- instruments, but in many works for
lyn and has served as guest conduct- orchestra, band, and for chamber
or with the Northern Orchestral So- music groups.
ciety, the Goldman Band and other ----------
school musical organizations.
A director of Ensemble Singing Paton., Laing Testify
and Choral Conducting at the Ober-
lin Conservatory of Music, Professor Prof. W. A. Paton of the School
Christiansen has also worked as di- of Business Administration and Prof.
rector of the A Capella Choir, the L. L. Laing of the economics depart-{
Elizabethan Singers and the Oratorio ment testified yesterday in Lansing
Society. His comprehensive analysis, at a review of the auditing methods
clear-cut explanations and practical of the state called for by Attorney-
procedure have won for him an envi- General Vernon Brown.

Student Council
Aids Harvard

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Pens - Typewriters - Supplies
"Writers Trade With Rider's"
RIDERS
302 South State St.

In ManyWays
(This is one of a series of articles on
etudent government at American tni-
versities and colleges.)
By WILLIAM ELMER
Harvard College's student govern-
ent body, the Student Council, was
tablished in 1908, to cooperate with
ie faculty in raising the general
tellectual standard at Harvard, to
ring before the governing bodies
f the College expression of under-
raduate opinion in an effort to
lake College policies better adapted
7the needs of the student body, to
operate with the committee on the
gulation of atheltics in eradicating
ny evils in the conduct of athletics,
nd to serve as the responsible au-
hority in matters where undergrad-
ate action, rather than opinion,
oncerns the College as a whole.
Agreement
Although merely an advisory body
n regard to College policies, accord-
ng to Dr. A. C. Hanford, dean of the
ollege, there is a gentlemen's agree-
ent between the dean and the
cuncil that no important change
n educational policy or in its rules
'ill be made without first consulting
he Council and seeking its advice.
Dean Hanford points out that the
host important service of the Coun-
il with respect to the administration,
as been in giving advice to the dean
egarding changes in the regulations
nd on matters of policy affecting
he educational and social life of the
ndergraduate, and in making sur-
eys and reports on important sub-
ects.
A tutorial system , and a genera]
xamination policy, reduction in
umber of hour examinations in ad-
anced courses, changes in the lan-
uage requirements, scholarships and
tudent employment, and the modi-
ication of the old and somewhat
iaternal rules regarding attendance
nd probation for upperclassmen, are
mong the achievements that can
e chalked up to the Student Coun-
il, Dean Hanford explained.
Council A Leader
"No important step has been taken
n Harvard College in the last quar-
er of a century in which the Coun-
il has not played a leading role,'
Dean Hanford said. Most of the
ecommendations springing from the
ouncil have been in the form of
oint reports of faculty and studen
ommittees, and the service rendered
n this way has proved invaluable
oa the administration.
Very representative of the work
[one by the Council, is its most re-
ent report on education. This sur-
'y examines the premises of a lib
ral education in general, studie
ritically the plans of concentration
eneral examination and tutorial in-
truction. Specific suggestions and
riticisms are directed at the preva-
ence of over-concentration and th
narrowness of the knowledge which
he average senior carries away with
him.
III

Music Festival
Tickets Selling
Well Sink Saysj
Reservations Are Coming
From Entire Midwest;
Places Still Available
Ticket sales for the forty-sixth an-
nual spring music festival to be held
here May 8-11 are running far in
advance of recent years' sales at this
time, Dr. Charles A. Sink said yester-
day, in predicting near-record crowds,
I for the four-day affair.
Reservations have been coming in
daily from the entire Middle West,
he said, but added that orders for
tickets to .all six concerts and to
individual concerts are still being
taken at the School of Music office.
Twelve vocal and instrumental so-
loists, three organizations and five
conductors will appear during the
four-day festival. The soloists: Lily
I Pons, soprano; Dorothy Maynor, so-
prano; Rosa Tentoni, soprano; Enid
Szantho, contralto; Giovanni Mar-
tinelli, tenor: Lawrence Tibbett, bari-
tpne; Robert Weede, baritone; Nor-
man Cordon, bass; Richard Hale.
narrator; Joseph Szigeti, violinist;
Emanuel Feuermann, violoncellist.
and Arthur Schnabel, pianist.
The Philadelphia Orchestra, the
University Choral Union and the
Young Peoples Chorus will also ap-
pear, conducted by Eugene Ormandy,
Thor Johnson, Saul Caston, Harl
McDonald and Juva Higbee.
Social Workers
Elect Officers
Club Of Detroit Institute
Aids Faculty, Students
(Special To The Daily)
Students of the University's In-
stitute of Public and Social Admin-
istration (Curriculum in Social
Work) in Detroit, elected officers
Wednesday for the Student Social
Work Club.
Joseph P. Andriola was elected
president; Edward Dalton, first vice-
president; Mary Holmes, second vice-
president; Elizabeth Harrington, sec-
retary; and Ruth Scofield, treasurer.
The aims of the organization are:
t (1) To promote closer relationship
of the faculty and students; (2)
provide student services including in-
formation about job placement, pro-
mote the publication of some of the
better students' term papers and
theses, and investigation of housing
facilities for students; (3) interpret-
s ation of the functions and fields of
social work and public administra-
tion; (4) promote social activities
t such as picnics, dances, and teas;
- (5) bring in outside speakers to dis-
e cuss problems of social work and a]-
z lied fields; and (6) establish closer
ties between the Institute students
and the campus in Ann Arbor.

h f

S;hnificant to resent and future
avhers o speecl is the newly re-
5d cu "e The Psychology of!
ech and the Audience, whichj
I )e offered to" hxe first time in]
he summer session, P of. G. E.]
ensmore of the so eech department
announced yesterday.
The course is being offered by the I
;beech department through the coop-
?ration of the psychology department
and will be presented by Prof. Walter;
B. Pillsbury, chairman of the Depart-
ment of Psychology.
The course willc hsist of a study
of the principles of the psychology
of masses as seen in speaker-au-
dience relations.

A udience
ye

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a 'l
I

I? ~lcis(ed Cou rse

SPECIAL
Underwood famous Universal Model.
New 1939 Models. Price complete with
case, $42.50. Budget terms $1.00 a week.
While they last
BALL & THRASHER
229 S. State St. Phone 3955
-- -- -

TE00
Referenceand
Fiction Reprints
Biography Trayel
9C to99C

r)

Parsonsi Presents Paper
Dr. Robert J. Parsons. of the De-
-Mt1111 of P.^thology in the Med-
i al School, returned this week from
4 w Orleans. where he presented
a paper before the American So-
ciety for Experimenta- Pathology.
The title of Dr. Parsons' paper was:
Tiansformation of the Mycelial
Form of Histpolasma Capsulatum,
Darling, to the Yeast-like Form of
Mice."

r"(r "te ui"n" Cl"b
Sponsors Hike Sunday
Plans for Sunday's meeting of the
Graduate Outing Club include a hike
to the water softening plant and ice
skating for the last time at the Coli-
seum, according to Abe Rosenzweig,

Grad., president of the club.
The group is to meet back of
Rackham Building at 2:30 and
return to it later for supper.

the
will

OMMMMEOMMEMW

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Phone 8270

FOLLLETT'S

MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE

322 S. State at N. University

Bob Graham, Mgr.

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III

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4F tc
at The
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C
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t
;v Befotre 6EAT~ER
at The
and his Orchestra
Saturay March 23
I CQnFnRRRT STVI.P >

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The March Issue of

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