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March 14, 1940 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-14

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THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1940

THE MICHIGAN ATLy

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Ake Brigode's
Band Will Play
At Odonto Ball'
Annual Dance To Be Held
At League Tomorrow;
Spring Motif Featured
Ondonto Ball, the fifth annual
dance sponsored by the junior class
of the School of Dentistry, will be
held from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. tomorrow
in the League Ballroom.
Ace Brogode and his Virginians
will play for the Ball. Featured as
"America's Most Danceable Dance
Band," Brigode possesses a style of
music particularly adapted for danc-
ing, being neither sweet or "hot."
Brigode will present Ruth Hart, his
Queen of Song, as vocalist and Buddy
Curran and William Dingel in nov-
elty specialties.
To Use Spring Motif
Decorations for Ondonto Ball will
utilize a spring motif. Two floral ar-
rangements will be placed on either1
side of the entrance to the ballroom,
and another one will be placed in
the lounge. Besides the flowers, 12
potted palms will be distributed
around the ballroom and in back of
the orchestra.
Two large cellophane bags, filled
with assorted colored balloons will be
suspended from the ceiling. These
bags will be opened and the balloons
will descend upon the dancers at a
high point in the evening.
Closed Dance
Programs will utilize the spring
motif in accordance with the decor-
ative scheme.
Ondonto Ball is a closed dance to
all but dental alumni, students, hy-,
glenists, and pre-dental students.
Tickets can be purchased at the desk
in the Dental Clinic or from mem-
bers of the central committee.
Tea To Be Held Saturday
At Women's Cooperative
An informal tea for all independent
girls interested in lower living costs
and other economic and social advan-
tages of cooperative living will be
held at the Alice Freeman Palmer
Cooperative House, 15,11 Washtenaw
Ave., from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday,
Betty Zunk, '42, head of the person-
nel committee announced yesterday.
Application blanks will be available
and all girls interested in living in
the House next year can fill them out,
Miss Zunk stated.

Plaids Gay For Suits

,

Spring suits this year are more
popular than ever and the most
outstanding suits of all that will be
seen are predicted to be in gay
plaids. Tailored collars, flared
skirts and many buttons combine to
make especially attractive suits.,
Church Groups
To Co-Sponsor
Party Saturday
For the first time in the history of
two campus church organizations,
the Lutheran Student Association and
the Methodist Wesleyan Guild will
sponsor a joint party from 8:30 p.m.
to midnight, Saturday at the Women's
Athletic Building, Frederick Liechty,
'40BAd., announced.
General co-chairmen of the affair
are Virginia Fulford, '41Ed., of Ann
Arbor, and Ted M. Zurhorst, '4'E, of
Memphis, Tenn.
' Mrs. Elizabeth Curtis, housemother
at Stalker Hall, and Mildred Sweet,
adult counselor at Stalker Hall, are
chaperons for the party.

Capitalist Ball
To Use Stocks
As Programs
Greek Pillars To Be Part
Of Decorations; Dancel
Will Be Given At Union
Preferred stock contracts will serve
as programs for the annual Schoolj
of Business Administration formal,
Capitalist Ball, to be held from 91
p.m. to 1 a.m. tomorrow at the Union.
Formed of the usual green and
gold leaf, the programs will equal,
a total of 100,000 shares of capital
stock, which according to members
of the central committee, is worth,
$100 per share. Another feature of
the unique programs will be the list-
ing of patrons under the heading,
"Trustees"'and the committeemen
listed as the "Board of Directors."
Use Modern Scheme
Modernistic props will be placed
around the entire stage of the Union
Ballroom, it was announced by Ar-
nold Kleiman, '40BAd., and Vance
Wilson, '41BAd., co-chairman in
charge of decorations. These props
are white, and will be arranged in
a step formation. Those placed in
front will be 12 feet high, while be-
hind them the props are larger and
larger until in the rear of the stage
they attain a height of 48 feet.
Small Grecian pillars form the
stage front. These harmonize with
both the stage props and the stage
background decorations.
Utilize Greek Pillars
Two massive Grecian pillars dec-
orate the stage background. White,
with gilt dollar signs decorating their
tops, these pillars will be lighted up
by vari-colored, cellophaned lights,
resulting in a rainbow effect.
Patron's seats will be arranged
under a large sign reading, "Office
of the Board of Trustees."
The entire motif, with its ac-
cent on the Grecian influence, blend-
ed with modern, has been created
and installed by William Sheppeard
of Detroit.
Seniors Cheer
'Hi-Falutin'
Performance
Last night's opening performance
of 'Hi-Falutin',' the 1940 Junior Girls
Play, brought reminiscenses of the
1939, play, and senior women were
there en masse to give skits from
last year's play and to applaud the
juniors' performance.
Traditionally given for the first
time the night of Senior Supper,
the annual play is for seniors espe-
cially on that night, and all senior
women attend in their caps and
gowns.
Barbara Telling led the singing
of the seniors, and Michigan songs
were sung during the march from
the ballroom into the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater. After the juniors
were seated, the sight of hundreds
of "grave old seniors" brought on
such strains as "Where no one
asks-" and "I'll ne'er forget my
college days," which were led by
Miss Telling.
Just before curtain, the senior song
was sung to the juniors, written to
the tune of a 1939 JGP number. Also
included in the seniors' program were
excerpts from "Pig in a Poke," such
as the train scene, with Barbara Bas-
sett making a quick recovery on a
few forgotten lines, and a scene be-
tween Jane Jewitt and Patty Hais-

lip, with an attack of giggles slightly
overcoming Miss Jewitt.
The old maids "a-sittin' and sit-
tin' and knittin' " were also present,
and Ann Vicary and Beth O'Roke
revived the two "Pig in a Poke"
characters in an amusing manner.
Petitioning To Continue
All eligible second semester junior
women may petition for positions on
the Assembly Council of the League
the remainder of this week until
5:30 p.m. tomorrow. Interviewing
of the applicants will take place from
3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wed-
nesday, March 19 and 20 at which
time suggestions for Assembly pro-
jects next year will be welcomed.

Spring styles for 1940 will be pre-s
viewed at the annual fashion show
to be given from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30
p.m. tomorrow by the League in con-
nection with one of the localnstores,
Mary Minor, '40, chairman an-
nounced yesterday.
Bill Gail's orchestra will play for
the style show, which is free to the
public, and tables will be set up in
the ballroom, the Grand Rapids
Room, the Hussey Room and the con-
course of the League.
Reservations may be made at the
League desk for tables, and tea will
be served for 25 cents to those who
wish it, if specified when reservations
are made.
Models for the style show will be'
Jane Nussbaum, '40, Mary Alice Mc-
Andrew, '40, Florence Brotherton,
'40, Beverly Bracken, '41, Yvonne
Westrate, '40, and Ellen .MacDonald,
'40. Others will be Kathryn Forberg,
I '41, Elizabeth Kimball, '40, Anne Mc-
Carthy, '40, Betty Markward, '43,

Mary Major, '41, and Marcia Con-
nell, '39.
Door prizes will be awarded, and
guests should leave their stubs with
their names written on them at the
door when they enter the ballroom.
Winners must be present when their
names are drawn, or the prizes will
not be received.
Ushers will include Phyllis Lovejoy,
'41; Jean Benham, Spec., Shirley Sil-
ver, '42; Helen Brady, '40; Mary Ann
McCoy, '41; Edith Longyear, '42;
Dorothy Cozens, 42; Jean Rakestraw,
'42; Margaret Hubbard, '41; Dolly
Haas, '42; and Jeanne Davis, '41.
Newsgirls who will distribute news-
papers to the audience in the ball-
room are Lois Basse, '42; Virginia Alf-
vin, '42, and Dorothy Bridgen, '42.
Many Colors, Shapes
Seen In New Jewelry

Formals, street clothes,. afternoon
dresses, campus outfits. negligees,
and hats will be included in the styles
to be shown, and styles for olden wo-
men will al.o be modeled.
Stout Council Will Meet
To Plan Health Program
Twenty men, comprising the Health
and Safety Committee of the Wash-
tenaw-Livingston Boy Scout Coun-
cil will meet at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow
in the Union, according to Dr. David
Van der Slice, chairman of the com-
mittee.
Plans for continuing the program
on health and safety education of
Scouts and cubs in the Washtenaw
County troops will be discussed with
emphasis placed in the training of
troop leaders for commissioners, and
through them the building of health
and safety practices in the daily acts
of the boys, Dr. Van der Slice said.

Spring Styles To Be Previewed
Today At Annual Fashion Show

EVERY DAY
If You Call

u

Fred
McKenzie
3022

Milton
Solomon
2-2243

Interviews To End
For Advisory Posts
Today is the last day that sopho-
more and junior women may be in-
terviewed for positions as orientation
advisers for next fall. Betty Slee, 40,
chairman of Judiciary Council, an-
nounced yesterday.
Inaterviewing- will be held from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. today in the Undler-
graduate Office of the League, and
all who come should bring their el-
igibility cards with them.
There will be no assistants this
year.
THE NEW YORK TIMES
will come to your home

Over Here
By VICKI

Here's an important reminder for
you-don't forget that today is the
-deadline for short stories entered in
the "Story Magazine" contest, that
the Publications Building or offices of
the Departments of English and En-
gineering English is the place to turn
in your manuscripts and that prizes
of $100 and $50 are hanging in the
balance.
For those of you who aren't famil-
iar with the details of the contest,
we repeat. "Story" magazine is spon-
soring the national all-college com-
petition, and manuscripts must be
submitted to the campus literary
publication for preliminary elimin-
ation before the two best are sent
on to "Story."
The first hurdle for contestants is
the local board of judges. "Perspec-
tives" editorial staff and Prof. Joe
Davis, Wallace A. Bacon, Herbert
Weisinger and Prof. Arno Bader, all
of the English department, make up
the panel of judges. "Perspectives"
reserves the right to print any story
submitted.
"Story Magazine" is known amon
writers as a laboratory publication.
Its scale of payment is comparatively
low, but publication in its pages car-
ries a great deal of prestige. Editors
of Perspectives urge everyone even
remotely interested in writing short
stories to submit their work today.

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MAMA, that season's here again
-and I'm not just talking - it's
shower season in more than one
way now. June is not far off, so
the tune is now set to help the
blushing bride. Yes sir - GAGE
at your service again in time of
need. Linen -
there is your an-
swer. No bride
can have too
much linen and
.,.any boost from
her friends is
much appreciat-
ed. Towels, for
instance, they
make a lovely
gift, and Gage
have some beau-
tifully hand embroidered hand
towels. They have either pretty
pastel colors or hand prints, priced
attractively for the occasion.
Other ideas are centered around
inexpensive bridge sets and chi-
nille rugs. You can't go wrong.
Give the bride a send-off that she
won't forget - you may be a bride
someday.
GLAMOUR, pronounced like
"amour" - a good deal similar in
other ways too, I might add - is
the keynote of the evening hours..
Informal or formal you should
and can add distinction to your
eyes. QURARY suggests red gold
eye sha-do for the blonds, and
green gold eye sha-
do for brunettes.
They are new Ar-
den subtleties, and
do their work ex-
tremely well. The
distinction made in
most her make-ups
for the different complexions and
hair tones is very important and
very flattering. There are tested
preparations, millions have been
satisfied. Another suggestion
Quarry gives you is slate grey
mascara for blue or grey eyes.

With preparations like these at
hand, your eyes can be glamorous
too!
* * ' * *
FASHION'S THE STYLE - All
right, get into the swing of things.
Equip yourself with spring cos-
metics as well as spring clothes.
CAIKINS-FLETCHER, this fash-
ion week, gives you color harmo-
nies for spring outfits. We can
not impress on you too much the
need of adapting your
make up to the sea-
son. They give you the
entire line of Dorothy
Grey. Cultivate fresh-
ness and glow: en-
courage 'sleek lines to
your facial contours
and smoothness, subdue your bad
points and bring out your best
features. All this is possible -
Dorothy Grey is the fairy god-
mother. And while you are at it,
don't forget her new Cockade line
for blues, reds and whites. Greet
the spring with a new complexion
- Keep up to date!
* I' * *
SWEETHEART OF ANY GUY
-is the Congo Lady, now a fea-
ture player at DILLONS SHOP.
An exotic little lady, but sweet in
Aher own little way. Her dress is
smooth-a bright blouse and shirt
ensemble. Its rayon crepe skirt
i sa dream with its glowing colors
and eight yard sweep of the skirt.
The blouse is of
white rayon crepe s
with full French
sleeves and studded
buttons down the
front. See it in the
window, it is mod-
eled by Joan Keny
and featured in Mademoiselle. A
sweet contrast to this sophiticated
delicacy is a white net formal.
It has a pleated sop with puffed
sleeves, full skirt with flowei' at
the waist. Make these initiation
formals the thrill of a lifetime in
a dress from Dillons!

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TWO STORES a-bloom with finery for you on
Easter morn and those days when Spring comes
to the Campus! Dresses from 7.95. Coats from
16.95. Suits from 15.00 Formals from 14.95.

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Handbags from 2.95.
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Gloves from 1 .00. Shoes
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Have You Visited the NEW

Don't let drab, faded hair
spoil your appearance...
make you unattractivel After your
next shampoo, ask your beauty
operator for a GLO-RNZ. It's

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