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March 10, 1940 - Image 11

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-10

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f n t i t irY x r K J J A % x

RSbert Weede
Is Well-Known
In Three Fields
Robert Weede, American baritone1
of the Metropolitan, who has achieved;
notice on the dramatic stage, in radio,
concert and oratorio, as born in
Baltimore where he studied voice un-
der the late George Castelle.
In 1927 he~ won the National Fed-.
eration of Music Clubs Contest and
went to the Eastman School of Music
at Rochester to continue his studies
under Adelin Fermin. Two years
later he won the Caruso Memorial
Foundation award and as a result
spent the following year and a half
in Italy. Returning to this country,
he was heard by Roxy in 1933 and has
since then been leading baritone of
the Radio City Music Hall presenta-
tions and the Music Hall of the Air
broadcasts.
Weede made his Metropolitan
Opera debut in the spring of 1937 as
Tonio in "Pagliacci." His operatic
experiences have also included ap-
pearances with the La Scala Com-
pany of Philadelphia, the St. Louis
Grand Opera. Company, the Cincin-
nati Summer Opera, at the Robin
Hood Dell during the summer season
of the Philadelphia Orchestra and
with the New York ,Philharmonic-
Symphony during the Stadium Con-
certs series.

Sings In Opera

Philadelphia Symphony Called
One Of World's Best Orchestras

ROBERT WEEDE
Who Said Spare Time?
In answer to the question what a,
symphony player does with his spare
time: If he is a member of the Phila-
delphia Symphony Orchestra, he is
rehearsed by Conductor Ormandy for'
three hours daily. He averages four
concerts a week in the busy season,
and travels thousands of miles each
year. On top of that, he usually has
outside playing and teaching engage-
ments. Spare time? Hah!

The Philadelphia Orchestra, found- en over most of Mr. Stokowski's du-
ed in 1900 "to encourage the per- ties to be the fourth great conduc-
formance of first class orchestral tor of the Orchestra.
music in the city of Philadelphia," The Philadelphia Group's reper-
has developed irom a node:,t body of tory covers the widest range and is
players to one of the leading orches-! capable of handling the great, comn-
tras in the world. positions of all schools from classic
Only four men have ever served as and romantic to ultra ,modern. "I
permanent conductors of the orches- keep my eye on tomorrow as well as
tra.' The first, Fritz Scheel, a Ger- today," remarked Ormandy, speak-
man musician, is credited with hav- ing of his programs.
ing established during his seven Because of this policy of playing
years the firm foundation upon which modern compositions the group has
the group's success is based. had many notable "firsts." Among
Upon his death in March, 1907, he these were the opera "Mavra" by
was succeeded by Carl Pohlig, who Stravinsky and Gluck's "Iphigenia
left the position of First Court Con- in Aulis."
ductor at Stuttgart, by permission of Boasting a large collection of valu-
the King of Wurtemburg, to accept able musical instruments, worth over
the proferred post in America. a quarter of a million dollars, the
Pohlig was followed by Leopold various musicians in the Orchestra
Stokowski, termed one of the greatest treat them as they do their own
musicians of the century, who did children.
much to bring the orchestra to the Some of the more valuable instru-
point of eminence it occupies in the ments are a Guarnerius violin, valued
world of music today. One of his by experts at thirty-five thousand
earliest and most impressive per- dollars alone, owned by Alexander
formances was the American premi- Hilsberg, concert master; a Stradi-
ere of Mahler's Eighth Symphony varius owned by Henry Schmidt, first
,requiring more than 1,000 orchestral violinist, dated 1720; which he sends
and choral performers. The event, every two years to a firm in London,
one of international significance, did the only one of its kind, for revar-
much to win for the Orchestra world- nishing.
wide attention. Other interesting instruments are
Eugene Ormandy has recently tak- Yasha Kayloff's Godfredo Cappo vio-
lin dated 1891, a 175-year-old cello
owned by William Schmidt, and the
double bases owned by Anton Torello

Emuanuesl
Feuct' awnlll...

Emanuel Feuermann, called to a professorship at the Conservatory of Music
at Cologne at the age of sixteen, has been pronounced by many critics to be the
finest violoncellist on the concert stage. An Austrian, he made his debut at the
age of eleven with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra under Felix Weingartner. Mr.
Feuermann came to this country five years ago, and made his debut with the New
York Philharmonic-Symphony under Bruno Walter. Since that time he has steadily
gained admnirers, among the most discriminating of critics as well as the music
loving public.
Mr. Feuermann will appear in concert Saturday afternoon, May 1 1

11

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MAR T I NIELL I

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IN

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CONCERT

OPERf

and his two sons, William and Carl.
The Torellos own about two dozen of
these deep-voiced giants, which have
been swathed in blankets to shield
them from varying temperatures and
weathers.
Besides the bass violin playing
Torellos there are two other families
playing with the Philadelphia Or-
chestra. The Grays, Alexander and
John, play the viola and violoncello
respectively and the four Gusikoffs
play a variety of instruments. Charles
plays the trombone, Ben and Isadore
are in the cello sections and Saul
Gusikoff Caston, a cousin, is first
trumpeter and asistant conductor.
Serkin Made Debut
As Vilin Soloist
W hen 12 Years Old
Born in Czechoslovakia 01 ussian
parents. ,.udolf Serkin, violin virtu-4
oso, made an immediate success on
his American debut as soloist with
the New York Philharmonic-Syn-
phony under the baton of Arturo Tos-
canini,
Serkin, who is still in his early
thirties,'was already playing credit-
ably at the ago of four. His parents,
however, ruled against a prodigy car-
eer and placed him under the tutelage
of Prof. Richard Robert in Vienna.
At 12 Serkin made his debut as guest
artist' with the Vienna Symphony
Orchestra, but although his success
led enthusiastic managers to offer
him tempting tours, his parents de-
cided he was still too young and ar-
ranged for him to continue his
studies.
When he finally did inaugurate his
career, he concertized France, Switz-
erland, Italy, Spain and Austria win-
ning applause from spectators and

-y
Rnd lvrt
2rr iiEClFlND 1 AY 1 ES7V1 NER
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FH RAE NT I9 L
Metrosda, ton R , et 8 °
FEON MA ETIVNLTONIER
F 9 IV
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F Experenced
ThusdyMey tplian3ris
'25

__.._ F

"The famous tenor's experience and mastery, his
feeling for style, his ability to fill the eye and gratify
the ear were potently in evidence."
New York Herald Tribune
SIXTH MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT

I

I

SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 11, at 8:30
HILL AUDITORIUM

t acclaim from critics.

THE

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IA

0

I

A-l

ESTIIA

under the baton of EUGENE ORMRNDY

11l~i

I

SRUL CASTON, fssociate Conductor

ii
ii
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Dili
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.-il

EUGENE -ORMANDY

SA UL CASTON

This thrilling orchestra, for the fifth -coseeutive Festival, will participate in
all six coneerts. Music-lovers know the fine work of this orchestra both here
and abroad. TIUE MAY FESTIVAL is proud to -present themn to Ann Arbor

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