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March 10, 1940 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-10

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SUPPLEMENT

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ANN ARBOR, MICH., SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 1940

.w.

Annual Four-Day

Music

Festival Begins

Sink

Sees

cOne

Of

Most

Successful'

Huge Advance
Sale Indicates
Every Concert
Will BeSellout
Record Figure Is Possible
As Entire Middle West
Responds To Program
Music Soiety Head
Explains Programs
Announcement of the programs and
solo artistsr have been so enthusias-
tically received, that the 1940 May
Festival promises to be one of the
most successful the University Musi-
cal Society has ever produced, Dr.
Charles A. Sink, president of the
Society, said yesterday.
Inquiries and requests for tickets
are being received in large number
from the entire Middle West, he add-
ed, indicating that the attendance
will probably surpass last year's near-
record total.
Huge advance sales for the six-
concert tickets have insured capacity
houses, Dr. Sink said, but added that
tickets for single concerts may still
be obtained at the School of Music
office.
In discussing the program for the
Festival Dr. Sink explained that this
season more emphasis than usual was
placed upon instrumental and en-
semble aspects of music, pointing to
the inclusion on the program of Josef
Szigeti, Emanuel Feuermann and Ar-
tur SchnLabel" -Ini add iion ,to te solo
numbers, Mr. Szigeti will provide the
violin obligato for a Lily Pons aria
from Mozart's "I re Pastore."
However, Dr. Sink emphasized that,
in building the programs for the
Festival, the Society "has endeavored
to keep in mind the divers tastes and
desires of a loyal and discriminating
public, both in the selection of artists
and organizations."
He expressed the hope that the
Society's offerings will meet the same
sincere approval which has greeted
past festivals, and tendered the Soci-
ety's appreciation to "its patrons and
music-loving public in general, for
their loyal and stimulating support
over a period of many years.'?
Rosa Tentoni
Is Thoroughly
merican Girl
Rosa Tentoni, young soprano star
for the past two seasons of the Metro-
politan Opera Association, has often
been termed a thoroughly American
woman:; she was born in the small
miing town of Buhl, Minn., and has
never set foot out of the United States
or Canada.
Despite this, however, Miss Ten-
toni's talent and temperament stem
directly from her Italian heritage
and depends especially on the great
influence of her father, Vincent.
Among the things he taught her were
the discipline and character she was
to need, pure Italian (he wouldn't
let her mother speak the dialect of
March to her) and the love for musi,
all of which has contributed greatly
to her success.
After a number of years of hard

work, she made her first appearance,
encouraged by Galli-Curci, in the
East in 1932, at a semi-private per-
formance of "Cavalleria Rusticana."
During the next few years her parts
became bigger and bigger and in the
winter of 1934 her real opportunity
came: she was chosen to sing under
Toscanini in Beethoven's Ninth Sym-
phony.
Since then she has starred in opera
at the New York Stadium summer
seasons, has been featured in the
Cleveland Orchestra's production of
Verdi's "Otello" has played in the
Hollywood Bowl's "Aida" and :,has

Predicts Fine Festival

Program For The 1940 May Festival

DR. CHARLES A. SINK
Enid Szantho
Made Success
In U.S.In 1935
Hungarian Contralto Sang
Role In Mahler's Second
With N.Y. Philharmonic
Opera, oratorio and song are all in
the repertoire of Enid Szantho, young
Hungarian contralto of the Metro-
politan Opera Association.
Born in Budapest, Miss Szantho
came to America in 1935, at the re-
quest of Otto Klemperer, to sing
with the New York Philharmonic-
Symphony Orchestra in Mahler's Sec-
ond Symphony. A fortnight later she
gave a New York recital, at which,
according to the. New York Times,
"by the gorgeousness of her voice
and the perfection of her artistry, she
scored a sensational success."
'Enid' From Irish Mother
Her father, retired Vice-Secretary
of State in Hungary, founded the
Museum of Social Hygiene in Buda-
pest. Her mother is Irish, which ex-
plains Enid's first name. 4
It was from her mother, considered
a fine pianist, that Miss Szantho in-
herited her musical talent. Her
mother taught in English, having sung
in England many times, including the
opera season in Covent Garden.
Miss Szantho studied voice at the
Royal Academy of Music and Dra-
matic Arts at Budapest. As a voice
student, she was discovered by the
famed director of the Vienna State
Opera, Franz Schalk, who engaged
her for the opera season. Just before
his death, Schalk told Hungarian
newspapers that he believed Miss
Szantho had "the most beautiful con-
[tralto voice in the world." In her
second year as a member of the
Vienna State Opera, she was engaged
by Siegfried Wagner to sing at Bay-
reuth, where she appeared at festi-
vals of five different seasons.
Sang Under Ormandy
After having sung in all the capitals
of Europe, she came to the United
States, where she sang under Eugene
Ormandy in Minneapolis and before
President and Mrs. Roosevelt at the
White House in a musicale.
The year 1937-38 marked Enid
Szantho's debut as a leading contral-
to of the Metropolitan Opera Asso-
ciation in the role of Frica in "Die
Walkure," and contributed a memor-
able performance of Clytemnaestra in
'Strauss' "Elektra." This year she is
returning to the Met for her third
season.
Hale Well-Known
As Actor-Singer
Richard Hale is known both as an
actor and a singer. His first acting
engagements, after his graduation
from Columbia Universitykwas with
the company of Mrs. Fiske.
Two years later he made his debut
as a singer with Yvette Guilbert.
Since that time he has sung recitals
in New York, London and Berlin, and
has been soloist with many of the

Wednesday Evening, May 8, at 8:30
Soloist:
LAWRENCE TIBBETT, Baritone
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
Entr'acte Khovantchina ............. Moussorgsky
"Lieutenant Kije" Suite .............. Prokofieff
Incidental solos: LAWRENCE TIBBETT
Hallucination Scene from "Boris
Godounoff".................Moussorgsky
Prince Galitzky's Aria from Act I,
from "Prince Igor" . ................ Borodin
MR. TIBBETT
Fifth Symphony in E minor ........ Tschaikovsky
(In commemoration of his 100th
birthday anniversary)
Thursday Evening, May 9, at 8:30
Soloists:
DOROTHY MAYN OR, Soprano
ROSA TENTONI, Soprano
ROBERT WEEDE, Baritone
RICHARD HALE, Narrator
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EUGENE ORMANDY and THOR JOHNSON,
Conductors
Music to Goethe's Tragedy, "Egmont" .. Beethoven
1. Overture 8. Entr'acte III
2. Recitation 9. Recitation
3. Entr'acte II 10. "Clarchen's
4. Recitation Death"
5. Song: "Die Trommel
geruehret" 11. "Melodrama"
6. Recitation 12. Recitation
7. Song: "Freudvoll und13. "Symphony of Vic-
Leidvoll" tory"
MISS TENTONI and MR. HALE
Cantata: "The Inimitable Lovers" ........ Vardell
MISS TENTONI, MR. WEEDE, and
CHORAL UNION
"Leise, Leise" from "Der Freischutz" .. von Weber
"Depuis le jour" from "Louise" ...... Charpentier
MISS MAYNOR
Legend: "The Homecoming of
Lemminkainen" .................. Sibelius
Friday Afternoon, May 10, at 2:30
Soloist:
ARTUR SCHNABEL, Pianist
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
SAUL CASTON, HARL McDONALD, and
JUVA HIGBEE, Conductors
Two Choral Preludes ............ Bach-Ormandy
1. O Mensch, bewein' dein' Sunde gross
2. Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme
Group of Songs:
1. Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair .. Foster
2. Spinning Song (German) .......Aslanoff

3. Star Lullaby (Polish) ........... Treharne
4. Swing Low, Sweet Chariot (Negro Spiritual)
5. En passant par la Lorraine (French) Tiersot
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
Sante Fe Trail Symphony ............ McDonald
CONDUCTED BY THE COMPOSER
Concerto No. 4 for Piano and Orchestra. Beethovef
MR. SCHNABEL
Friday Evening, May 10, at 8:30
Soloists:
LILY PONS, Soprano
JOSEPH SZIGETI, Violinist
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
Suite for Strings, Op. 5 . ................Corelli
I. Sarabande
II. Giga
III. Badinerie
Blonda's Aria from "Die Entfuhrung aus
dem Serail" .................... ... Mozart
Aria, "Caro Nome" from "Rigoletto" . ... Chausson
MISS PONS
Poeme...........................Chausson
MR. $ZIGETI
Ballet Music from "The Machine Man" .... Zador
"L'Amero saro costante" from "Il re
Pastore"........................Mozart
Obligato by MR. SZIGETI
Bell Song from "Lakme...............Delibes
MISS PONS
Symphony in D minor .................. Franck
Lento. allegro non troppo
Allegretto
Allegro non troppo
Saturday Afternoon, May 11, at 2:30
Soloists:
JOSEPH SZIGETI, Violinist
EMANUEL FEUERMANN, Violoncellist
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
Compositions by Brahms
Variations on a Theme by Haydn
Double Concerto in A minor for Violin and Violon-
cello and Orchestra
MR. SZIGETI and MR. FEUERMANN
INTERMISSION
Symphony No. 2 in D major
Saturday Evening, May 11, at 8:30
Soloists:
ENID SZANTHO, Contralto
GIOVANNI MARTINELLI, Tenor
ROBERT WEEDE, Baritone
NORMAN CORDON, Bass
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor
Samson and Delilah ..............Saint-Saens

Music Festival Was Three-Concert
Affair At Inception 46 Years Ago
-~

Forty-six years ago bustles and
four-button suits jammed the ric-
kety seats and aisles of the old
University Hall Auditorium to hear
Dr,. Albert A. Stanley conduct the
Choral Union in Verdi's "Requiem,"
and bring the first May Festival
into glorious being.
It was a birth that succeeded
through its novelty and the publicity
that novelty produced.
A two-day, three-concert affair,
it was not until the last concert of
the second day that sufficient pub-
licity had filtered into the hinter-
lands to attract the musical follow-
ing. For that last concert, railroads
were forced to run special "trains'
to accommodate the crowds, and suc-
cess was insured.
Site Transferred
The following year a fourth con-
cert was added, and later, a fifth
concert. In 1913, the Festival was
transferred to the newly-constructed
Hill Auditorium, and with the addi-
tion of a sixth cncert, the set-up took
tion of a sixth concert, the set-up took
today.
Founder of the Festival in 1894
Martinelli Can 'SWing It'
With Rest of 'Hieneats'

the musical world to Ann Arbor.
In those years, practically all the
Their early efforts resulted in the
institution that for nearly half a-
century has drawn the attention of
was Dr. Stanley, president of the
University Musical Society, and his
associates on the Board of Directors.

other distinguished guest conductors,
has appeared.
Out of the colorful background of
the first 46 years have come as colt
orful incidents. Many are still left
who can remember the strange re-
union backstage during Madame
Schumann-Heink's recital in "U"
Hall Auditorium. In the middle of
one of her numbers, voices were
heard coming through the thin pine
doors that separated the stage from
the tiring-room. Dr. Charles A. Sink
went backstage to find the soprano's
husband speaking in no uncertain
terms with George Jewett, colored
janitor. It seems he and Jewett,
former star footballer with Ann Ar-
bor High and the University in the
'90s, had played once against each
other in Chicago and were taking
the opportunity to relive the exper-
ience!
Baromeo Comes On
Remembered, too, has been the
first appearance on Hill Auditor-
ium's stage of Chase Baromeo, Met-
ropolitan basso who has sung sev-
eral times at the Festival. As Dr.
Sink tells it, the artist who was to
appear that evening was one hour
late. During the interval Mr. Stock
a n fi1,C p hac-an rnla q al 1,ar

fl1_ AT.TT TA_ STANLEY . I

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