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October 02, 1938 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-10-02

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THE 'MICHIGAN DAILY

WISCONSIN ..0. 27 NORTH'ERN .. 21 ILLINOIS . . .. 44 PURDUE.. ....21 CHICAGO.......0( SANTA CLA
MARQUETTE . .. 0 KANSAS ST. . . .. 0 DE PAUL .. . .....7 BUTLER .....6 BRADLEY TECH .0 STANFORD

RA . 22

CALIFORNIA

27 S. CALIFORNIA . 7
..3 OREGON STATE .0

- 0 11 WASH. STATE

Wolverines

To

14-0 Victory Over Spartans

,

PRESS PASSES

By BUD BENJAMIN

!

Victory Notes .
THE MICHIGAN family from coast
to coast should be satisfied today.
They again have a football team.
While flamboyant headlines herald
the greatness of Paul Kromer, the
innate possibilities of Tom Harmon,
and the mastery of Norm Purucker,
this corner looks elsewhere for its
star.
In this chronicler's opinion, the
golden medal of greatness belongs to
Capt. Fred Janke.

Crisler spoke over the air from the
locker room. He refused to give credit
to any one man stating
"They all were outstanding.j
To give credit to one would be an
injustice to another. They were
great."
"The most spectacular play,"
he stated in answer to a query,
"was Hook's fake spinner in the
fourth quarter which carried us
to the two yard line. It wasn't
the running so much but the exe-
cution and blocking was perfect."
Fielding H. Yost, venerable athletic
director, was giving some convincing
Indian war whoops in the locker
room. Alumni were positively uncon-
trollable in their joy.

"How about giving us a boost
for a change?" demanded Ralph
Heikkinen as he passed on the
way to a shower. "We've got a real
ball club this year," he bellowed
as only Hike can.
The athletes were surprisingly un-
marked after the game. Few bore
more than scratches.
O VER TO the Spartan morgue and
a philosophical Charlie Bachman.
"Well, you've got a ootbal
team at last," he said. "They'll
go places from now on if they
play that kind of ball."
"Your line beat us," he con-
tinued. "They outcharged us and
outrushed us throughout. That's
the story of this ball game."
The most spectacular play?
"IHook's run to the two yard
line," he answered. "Beautifully
executed. The thing that hurts,.
though, is that I diagrammed that
play for the men at halftime and

STATISTICS MICHIGAN STATE-MICHIGAN FOOTBALL GAME
M.S.C. Michigan
First Downs ................... .............. 9 11
Yards Gained Rushing (net) .....................25 188
Forward Passes Attempted.... .................26 8
Forward Passes Completed ...................... 13 4
Yards Gained By Forward Passes ................ 158 47
Yards Lost, Attempted Forward Passes ............. 7 0
Forward Passes Intercepted By ..................0 4
Yards Gained, Run Back of Intercepted Passes .... 0 10
Punting Average (From Scrimmage) ............... 49 33
X-Total Yards Kicks Returned ................... 42 97
Opponents Fumbles Recovered ...................2 2
Yards Lost By Penalties ......................... 0 25
X-Includes Punts and Kickoffs.

I

He didn't score any touch-
downs. He didn't intercept any
passes. He didn't boot prodigious
punts or plough through the line
for extra yardage. But he stood
out among an amazingly power-
ful group of Michigan linemen by
virtue of his great play.
Janke gave 100 per cent. He never
let-up; he continually starred on of-
fense and defense. While the fleet
Michigan backs were tearing State's
line to shreds, it was big Fred and his
six colleagues of the line that were
opening gping aisles through which
his teammates could pass.
When they carried Janke off the
field in the fourth quarter, his in-
jured leg dragging behind him, ob-
servers stared on in horror. Was the
Janke jinx unshakable?
A leg injury had kept hin out of
action his sophomore year, last year,
and after a trial at fullback, it was
only in the latter stages of the season
that he saw action.
Janke shed genuine and un-
ashamed tears as they led him off
the field and to the waiting am-
bulance. What grim thoughts
must have obsessed him as that
ambulance sped to the hospital.
His last year-his year of cap-
taincy-and injured in the first
game.
Yet, in keeping with the spirit of
this "great beeg Meechigan day," as
Fielding H. Yost would put it, I'm
pleased to announce that latest re-
ports from the University Hospital
indicate that Janke's injury is not
serious.
Hit from behind by two .falling
players, Fred apparently strained
ligaments in his leg. Ex-rays are
still being taken.
This column joins every Michigan
student in wishing Janke a speedy re-
covery. It's a new era, they say, and
that means goodbye to the Janke
jinx.
*$ *
IOCKER ROOM visits brought a
most important switch. The
morgue, as it is popularly called, was
moved to the right side while slap
happy inn passed over to the left.
In other words, victor and vanquished
changed sides, and instead of auto-
matically turning to the left to hear
the wail, I now found it on the right.
It was a highly pleasant transition.
The Michigan locker room fair-
ly roared with exuberance. In
fact the only sober faces in the
lot belonged to Crisler, Marti-
neau, and Munn, who were ap-
parently more tired than the
players.
* * *
"Boy, did you hear that line smack
'em," cried Munn. "How they did
charge. No kiddin' every time I heard
that boom after the charge it gave
me a thrill."

told them to watceh for it-old
83.".
"We had some bad breaks," he con-
tinued. "Pingel overshot Nelson on a
pass in the first quarter that would
have meant a score. There were oth-
ers, too, but please don't quote me on
any excuses."
"If you can't lose," he con-
tinued, "you don't deserve to win."

Paid my respects to Harry Kipke
in the radio booth and watched him
several times during the game. He
had an indescribable look at times-
one that suggested a person deeply
buried in thought.
Sparta was completely whipped.
Even the goal posts were generally
disregarded. Lansing observers were
lavish in their praise of Michigan.

YOU CAN SEE A THOUSAND FOOTBALL GAMES
1/fe l $ $ e eYpetl o4uoctated/9 I

wtdtm, whaie tepa~tti appeat ia thi pape

By direct wire from gridirons the nation over, these trained reporters color-
fully describe kickoffs, cross-bucks, end-runs, and the thousand thrills of the
game WH ILE TH EY ARE HAPPEN ING.
The Associated Press reports the news of football as it reports the news of
the world-swiftly, accurately, completely.
ead 4ated / tll ad

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