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October 01, 1938 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-10-01

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i

FOOTBALL
EXTRA!

IAO SiAia

xtt

FOOTBAL
FEXTRA!

VOL. XLIX. No. 6

Z-323

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCT. 1, 1938

PRICE FIVE Cl

I I

Wolverines Are Seth
ToBreak Four-Year
Michigan State Jinx

Lineups for Today's Game

University of Michigan

85,000 Expected To Fill
Stadium To See Opener
With Determined State'
Kickoff At 2 P. M.;
Weights About Even
By BUD BENJAMIN
Four years of football humiliation
go on the block today.
Before the excited eyes of, more
than 85,000 football crazed fans,
Michigan and Michigan State tangle
in the 1938 inaugural at the Stadium.
Game' time is 2 p.m.
Their eyes aglow and their spirits
high by the concerted cry of "it's
Michigan's year at last" and the im-
petus of a new coaching staff, it will
nevertheless be an underdog Wolver-
ine that hits the might of Michigan
State this afternoon.
Cocky and arrogant, State will seek
to attain the zenith of their football
domination. Never in its history. has
Michigan been defeated five years
in a row by any rival. That is State's
aim today.
Oan Michigan come back? Today
the cry resounds in every nook and
mner of the campus. Football fever
has hit this town and the ennui of
the,.i tine campus existence has ut-
terly disappeared. For in the eyes of
the rabid Wolverine fan there is only
one thing at stake today-the success
or failure of the 1938 season.
Coaches Leaders
Gridiron chicanery today will be,
directed by two of the leading coaches
of the country. Leading the army
of Sparta will be baldish, affable,
Charley Bachman, exponent of the
Notre Dame system and brains of
State's four victories.
Worrying for Michigan is Herbert
Orrin (Fritz) Crisler, quiet, intelli-
gent and eager to auspiciously open
his new regime at Michigan. Crisler
employs the single wing with an un-
balanced line to either side.
Data Incomplete
Lineup data at writing is incom-
plete. Michigan State's roster is set
with Ed Abdo's replacement of Dar-
win Dudley the only change over
theĀ°11 that faced hapless Wayne last
week-end. Michigan's starting ros-
ter has been the cause celebre ever
since practice began Sept. 10.
Statistically Michigan holds a
negligible weight advantage both in
line and in backfield. The Wolver-
ine line averages 193% pounds from
end to end, one more than the State

riot Possesses
Many Famous
Predecessors
When 5,000 Michigan students fell
back before the onslaught of police
tear gas last night, it was the finish'
of the fourth major riot in University
history and the third in which tear
gas was used..
It was almost exactly a year ago
today-Oct. 1-when the most serious
fracas in recent Ann Arbor history
took place. When the last results
had been tabulated, four University
students were under arrest, Patrol-
man Rolland Gainsley had suffered
an injury which necessitated an op-
eration and several students were
isted among those hurt.d:
Besides that students made short
order of a fire truck, seizing- the ig-
nition keys, throwing the extinguish-
er into a fire, letting the air out of
the truck tires, removing the .spare
ires and picking up the truck and
noving it to the sidewalk!
Before the crowd finally dispersed
police had released tear gas three
times-for the first time since the
Torch murders of five years ago.
Jerry Hoag was also manager of
Butterfield's Liberty St.nshowhouse
the night of March 4, 1923 when 5,-
000 students, celebrating a basketball
victory over Wisconsin which gave
them the Big Ten title, stormed the
place and did $1,500 worth of dam-
(Continued on Page 6)
Student Killed
In Auto Crash,

Pos.
LE
LT,
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
L"
IM
FB

Name
Dan Smick or
Vince Vaick
Fred Janke, (Capt.)
Jack Brennan
Archie Kodros
Ralph Heikkinen
Bill Smith
John Nicholson
Forest Evashevski
Jack Meyer
Paul Kromer
or To n Harmon
Fred Trosko
or Norm Pimrile.ker
Wally Hook or
Ed Phillips

Yrs. on
Squad
2
0
2
I
1
2
7
1
0
0
0
2
2

Wt.
205
170
205
200,
190
182
210
190
198
195
1 60
194
154
180
176
180

Height
6'1"r
5'9 "
6'2"
6'3 "
6'1"
5'9"
5'10"
5,'~
5'10

Home Town
Hazel Park
Holly
Jackson
Racine, Wis.
Alton, Ill.
Ramsay
San Antonio, Tex.
Elkhart, Ind.
Detroit
Elyria, Ohio
Lorain, Ohio
Gary, Ind.
Flint
Youngstown, O.
Grand Rapids
Bradford, Pa.

Ii'

Michigan State

Pos.
LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

Name
C. Walter Nelson
Alex Ketzkon
Lyle Rockenbach
Ronald Alling
Edward Abdo
Ernest Bremer
Mike Kinek
Leslie Bruckner
Joahn P ingel
Steve Szasz
Usif Haney

Yrs. on}
Squad
2
l
2
0
2
l
1
2
2.

Wt.
202
190
185
190
193
195
190
195
178
165
190

Height
6'1"
5'10"
5'9"1
r0"
5'10 "
6'0"
6'1"
6'1"

Home Town
Chicago, Ill:
Mattawan
Crystal Lake, Ill.
Lansing
Detroit
East Lansing
Whiting, Ind.
Milan
Mt. Clemens
Arlington Hts., Ill.
Kingsrt, Tenn.

Crisler Em hasize
State's Experiene(
Bachman Puzzle(
Exclusive Interviews Show Both Mento
Would Prefer Classic Contest Later;
Sophs Are Question Mark
CRISLER INTERVIEW
Coach Fritz Crisler in an interview with The Daily yesterday admit
that Michigan was entering today's game with Michigan State as underd
but refused to predict an outcome for the classic meeting.
"Anything can happen in football," said Crisler. "Sure we're the undi
dogs. On paper and by virtue of past form, State should beat us, but forti
ately football is not decided that way. That's what makes it a. great game.
"Physically," said Crisler, "the team is ready for the game. TI
muscles are hardened and they're toughened, but they haven't reached t
full endurance yet: They are not as far advanced as they will be later."
"Mentally,"- he continued, "I can't say yes or no. What they do a
how they feel immediately before game time is what counts."
Asked how his m'en felt about the State game, Crisler stated:
"They aren't unduly hopped up. They're o. k., but they feel that our s
son does not open and close against State."
What does this game mean to the players?
"It means a lot," replied Crisler," yet I don't think they'll fold if we 14
If they do, it will hurt."
Crisler admitted his, dependence upon sophomores might endan
Wolverine possibilities:
"Every coach is worried about his sophomores." he stated. "They have
been under fire, and you never can figure who will rise to-the heightsa
who will collapse."
Crisler also admitted that the "stop Pingel" problem wasa pressing o
"Although I've never seen Pingel I've heard plenty about him," he stag
"We're going to-rush his passing and kicking plenty but that boy can ru
hear. We can't concentrate on one of his specialties. He's got too many."
Speaking of being underdogs, Crisler especially emphasized the grea
experience of the State players, who average practically a year more in e
perience than do the Wolverines, and also the transition that his men h
had to make under a changed coaching regime.
"If we hadn't taught a new system," he said, "we would be much furt
along. Much smoother. Much more finished."
He admitted that the blocking and tackling were improved but empb
sized that he still desired improvement in those departments.
"We have a long way to go yet," he said.
Crisler, refused to issue any lineup.
"Nothing until game time," was his retort.
He said he would substitute according to the progress of the game.
"One thing is certain," he concluded. "We'll give'em absolutely eve
thing we've got. They may be hot and everythiag may be working right
them and then we'll get whipped. But we'll still shoot the works."
And the precedure might conceivably be reversed., '
"Yes," he grinned, "yes indeed."
He seemed pleased with the idea.

Officials:
Officials:-Referce J. S. Getchell (St. Thomas); Umpire
Graves (Ill.); Headlinesmen: P. W. Finsterwald (Syracuse).

Lion Gardiner (Ill.); Field jpdge Perry

1

Charles Brandman, '40M,
Dies NearToledo, 0.
Charles Brandman. '40M, 23 years
old, was killed early yesterday in anj
automobile accident which occured
shortly before 8 a.m. yesterday at the
corner of Middlesex Drive and Dar-
lington Road, near Toledo.
Wade Stone, jr., a high school
freshman, driver of the other car,
was seriously injured.
Another student, Florence Schwab,
a sophomore in the University music
school, was seriously injured yester-
day afternoon when she stepped out
between twodparked cars at E. Wil-
liam St. and Maynard St. into the
path of an automobile. Miss Jessie
E. Pickell, 1053 Olivia Ave., was the
driver of the car.
Miss Schwab was knocked uncon-
scious and suffered a fracture of the
left arm. Taken to St. Joseph's Mer-
cy Hospital, she was later transferred
to the University Hospital. From
Cincinnati, she lives at 236 S. Thayer
St. in Ann Arbor.

Reich Crosses I
Czech Border;
Poles Militant4
Mob Greets Chamberlain
Who Says He Returned
With Honorable Peace
BERLIN, Oct. 1- (Saturday) -(UP)
-The first contingent of German
troops crossed the Czechosovak fron-
tier near Aigen, upper Austria, early
today starting Adolf Hitler's occu-
pation of territory granted him by
the four-power Munich accord.
The grey-clad German ifantry-
men marched over the border shortly
after 1 a. m. (7 p. mn. EST, Friday)
little more than an hour after the
midnight deadline Hitler had set for
his occupation.
PRAGUE, Sept. 30 --P) - The
Czechoslovak government, after bow-
ing under protest to the Munich par-
tition accord,'received a new Polish
note tonight calling for immediate
response to Poland's territorial de-
mands.
In Warsaw, the Polish government
was understood to have set noon to-
morrow (6 a. m. EST) as a deadline
for answering its demands.

Mass Meeting
Hears Appeal
To Aid Czechs'
The necessity for America to help
in the preservation of democracy in
Europe was urged in the three reso-
lutions introduced at the mass "Save
Czechoslovakia" Rally held at noon
yesterday on the library steps.
Approximately 250 students attend-
ed the meeting which Dr. Kenneth B.
Miller, executive secretary of the Pres-
byterian Church in Detroit, and Mor-
ris Lichtenstein, '39, addressed.
Although some people think a
demonstrationof this variety is futile,
Dr. Miller declared, in the face of
recent developments, it really has a,
two fold purpose: we can enter pro-
test against what has been done to
the Czechoslovakian people and we
can m;narshal opinion to prevent the
rest of the country going the same
way.
Dr. Miller, who lived in Czechoslo-
vakia several years, praised the coun-
try for the admirable use to which it
put democracy. It has been extreme-
ly liberal in its treatment of minori-
ties, he said, and the Sudeten prob-
lem most certainly could have been
settled peacefully were it not for Hit-
ler.
Resolutions urging the government
to send representations to Germany
not to violate the Kellogg-Briand
Pact, to declare sympathy with Czech-
oslovakia and facilitate trade be-
tween that country and the United
States and to declare an embargo on
war supplies were read by Robert
(Continued on Page 6)

5,000 Students
In Near Riot
After Pe Rally
p Y
Officers Take 2 Students,
Free Them Unbooked;
Tear Gas Used Freely
Five thousand students last night
prolonged ,a pep rally into a two-hour
stampede through Ann Arbor streets
as local police used tear gas and fire
hoses to force the mob from one
street fire to another toward Ferry
Field.
At least. two students were taken
into custody by police and later re-
leased. Police would not reveal their
names. They were not booked.
Gas was releasedrat least 15 times.
An expectant crowd of upperclass-
men and townspeople lined State
Street and North University Ave. at
9 p.m. waiting for the end of the
Hill Auditorium pep-rally, where a
football short was shown "through
courtesy of the Michigan Theatre" in
an effort to forestall a repetition of
last year's attack on the theatre's
facade.

contingent, However, should Dan
Smnick supplant Vince Valek in the
Wolverine starting line, as is likely,
the local's average will be boosted to
198.
'The backfield presents a peculiar
situati6n in that two sets of backs
are at Crisler's disposal for starting
use, One set-Meyer, Harmon, Pu-
ruc1ker, and Hook-average 186%
pounds while the other-Evashevski,
Kromer, Trosko, and Phillips-av-
(Cotinued on Page 3)

LONDON, Sept. 30 -(AP)- Prime
Minister Chamberlain today brought
back from Munich what he called
"peace with honor . . . peace for our
time."
To cheering crowds and an approv-
ing Monarch he reported two accomp-
lishments.
Summed up, his words in two
(Continued on Page 2)

i

sq rlwrr ui niaip 'i iib M ii ii Si" Lr r r i i r

Most Of These Wolverines Will Start Against Michigan State Today'

6,000 Ask Free Show
The 6,000 students who jammed
Hill Auditorium to hear Coach Fritz
Crisler and Jimmy Sabo of tle al-
umni club of Gary, Id., poured out
of the hall and waited aimlessly at
the corner of State Street and North
University for the traditional cry,
"Free Show at the Michigan!"
Finding the theatre closed after
the 7 p.m. show, (the Majestic was
closed all evening), the crowd stam-
peded down Liberty in response to
new shouts of "Free beer at the Pret-
zel Bell." Again disappointed, the
leaders started a fire at the corner
of Main and Liberty, which attract-
ed a mob that packed Liberty street
for a full block campus-ward.
Police Armed
A dozen policemen, aried with
tear gas equipment and billy clubs,
pushed the crowd back to the side-
walks and then released the sweet,
stinging fumes, which aided by an
easterly wind drove the students hel-
ter-skelter up Liberty toward the
campus.
Fires sprang up simultaneously at
Division and Maynard on Liberty
Street. Repeated barrages of tear
gas, accompanied by cries of "here
comes the cops," continued the pre-

BACHMAN INTERVIEW,
Contacted by The Daily last night, Michigan State coach Charley Bac
man followed Fritz Crisler's suit witha lusty complaint:
"Say we don't know what to expect up here," he told The Daily. "Ii
taught the boys everything I know and we're prepared for anything, but
wish I knew what was coming."
"We've left nothing undone in preparing for this game, and we've check
all the records, but still it's awfully short notice."
"Yessir," he continued, "it's a real rush order. No time. Too much
teach. No scouting reports."
"It's plenty tough," he wailed.
Won't those Michigan sophomores help the State cause. Crack und
fire?
"I don't know," he said. "All I know about your boys is what I read
the papers. Course I'd heard of Harmon and I knew of him. Everyone ha
But the rest are all strange to me. They may crack under fire."
Speaking to Crisler and Bachman clearly indicated that both m
Avould prefer this game later in the season. Both agreed that the gaa
was too big for this time of year and vehemeritly stated that their tear
were not ready yet.
"That's an awful big crowd for this early in the year," said Bacheua
"And it's going to be some game."
How about the famous "weak" sisters-the State tackles.
"Say," he asserted, ."they didn't look so bad against Wayne did the
Yet, Wayne isn't Michigan and we may have trouble at that position."
"We're ready," Bachman said, "and I hear Michigan is too. All then
left to do is play the game."
"Had a real pep rally up her tonight," he continued. "Biggest era
ever. Four to five thousand. Lotta spirit."
As to his squad's condtion:
"They're fit," he said. "There are a few injuries but not serious enoul

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