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January 26, 1939 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TRUtSIA , JAN. U, -1939

THE MICHIG AN DAILY

Ray-Off' Dance Will Be Held Friday, Feb. 24, In League

Ballroom

Mortar: Board
Will Spons Or
Annual Affair'
Jenny Petersen Is General
Chairman; Members Of
Committee Are Listed
"Pay-off," annual sweater-and-
skirt dance sponsored by Mortar
Board;, senior women's honorary so-
ciety, will be held from 9 'p.m. to 1
a.m. Friday, Feb. 24, in the ballroom
of the League, Marcia Connell. chair-,
man of publicity, announced yester-1
day.
Plans for the dance are being car-
ried out under the direction of Jenny
Petersen, president, and her commit-
tee is composed of Barbara Heath,
chairman of music and ballroom,
Jean Holland, ticket chairman, Nor-
ma Curtis, chairman of favors, Grace
Wilson, patrons chairman, Janet Ful-
lenwider, chairman of entertainment,
arld Miss Connell, publicity chairman.
Started Last Year
"Pay-off," a women's invitational
dance, was instituted last year with
the idea of its oecoming traditional.
Tickets may be secured from any
member of Mortar Board, and are
priced at $1.50.
The orchestra and floor show, both
of which will be brought in from out-
of-town, will be announced later, Miss
Connell said. Women of all classes
are invited to attend.
Rasehel Played Last Year
Betty Gatward was chairman of
last year's dance, which was held
Friday, Feb. 25. Marie Sawyer was in
charge of the music committee, and

To Lead J-Hop Swing

COUNT BASIE
Knee-High Gaiters
And Wooden Soles
Defy Wintry Blasts
Boots, my dears, are positively a
heaven-sent boon for those of youI
who want comfort in this frosty
sample of the weather man's humor,
without the slightest sacrifice of
style.
The very latest modes, resembling
somewhat the old fashioned gaiters,
are almost knee high, and are made
of wool woven with "lastex" to make
them fit snugly. They fasten on rath-
er like spats and do away entirely
with the need for golashes.
There isn't any drift too deep for
a knee-high calfskin boot. A la a
Dutch dairymaid, they have thick
wooden soles, and are grand for hik-
ing, skiing or skating. In light colors,
they are attractive with any winter
costume.

Moping On The Mall
By Meandering Minnie
There is, no doubt, no particular point in observing that finals are
about to be upon us. But they are.
The library is full of eager little faces these days. brightly bent over
their books as they start to leisurely review their work for the semester.
Gwen Lemon, Marney Coe, and Alice Frayer were in the study hall yes-
terday, as were Jean Belle King, Stephanie Parfet and Priscilla Kennedy.
Bill Gingrich and Bob Palmer were hunched over some old exams.
memorizing same, no doubt, until Bill got smooth and went out with Jane
Scott for a cigarette. That's life, I always say.
Poly. Sci. Whiz Is Worried. ...
Dick LaMarca looked worried like crazy; brooding about Poly Sci 141,
maybe. Wally Hinkle appeared like a face at the window as he stared in'
from the hallyway. Ralph Heikkinen, the idol of the
air lanes, was observed sunken in childish slumber
at one table. At least, he was a sleep until the ravish-
ing creature next to him hit him on the head with
her glasses case.
.t' The bowling alleys are all cluttered up with
winmin these days. Mim Cohen, Jean Ross, Helen
New and Helen Rolnick are among the many get-
ting their daily workout at the delightful sport.
From the depths of the other side of town, our
police reporter, one of those cigarette puffing ner-
vous wrecks whom one seems to perennially en-
counter in wierd places whatever the hour of day or night, comes up with
a yarn worth telling. A year or so ago, it seems, the Circuit Court reporter
decided she needed a vacation. An assistant was procured and off she
trekked to New Orleans and blamy breezes.
Stenographer Stymied ..
x Next day court was declared in session
and the attorney promptly rose and asked
that .previous testimony be read back. The
new girl took one long look at the cryptic
shorthand symbols her predecessor hadl
scrawled and threw up her hands in de-
spair.

Brings Rhythm Band

i

"A v~ilin -nd a. isdirec'ted blow .

1,

HENRY BUSSE
To Hold J-Hop Jr.
Feb. 10 At lnioni
A J-Hop Jr. dance will be given
from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday, Feb.
10 (J-Hop night), at the Union ball-
room for those students unable to1
obtain tickets for J-Hop, Don Nixon,
Union publiicty chairman, announced
yesterday.
The dance will be informal, and the
regular price of one dollar per couple
will be charged. Music will be fur-$
nished by Bob Steinle and his Melody
Men. Table reservations may be ob-
tained by calling the main desk at
the Union.

with a hammer led to the creation of
the distinctive trumpet playing of
Henry Busse, whose orchestra will
alternate with the swing band of
Count Basie in, dispensing rhythm
for J-Hoppers riday, Feb. 10.
The hammer blow caused a finger
of Busse's left hand to break, and,
as Henry was a student of the violin,
at that time, his left hand was most
important in his musical efforts. A
halt was called to the violin lessons,
but Busse was still benthonshavingra
musical career. His father's old cor-
net was pulled out of a closet and
Busse continued his music study with
his one good hand.
While playing his trumpet with a
vaudeville troupe in San Francisco,
Busse heard of an orchestra about
to be organized by Paul Whiteman in
Los Angeles. He packed his trumpet
and left for Los Angeles and was
with the "King of Jazz" the night he
made his debut of orchestrated jazz
at the old Alexandria Hotel.
Busse was trumpet soloist for
Whiteman for 10 years. During this
time he gained fame for his soprano
effects in playing such pieces as

..

_ _ __
9 e

RADIO'
S ERVICE
ANY MAKE
DiAL 3694

"When Day Is Done" and "Ect Lips."
Busse's step from trumpet player
to banO leader came six years ago,
and his band's first engagement was
at the Hotel New Yorker.

i

Rise Of Henry Busse Described

*

W EDEMEYER'S

221 E. Liberty_
Read Daily Classified Ads

GOODYEAR'

S

They had to adjourn the case until the,
vacationing one returned to decipher what
she'd written!

iffy
N1
O i
t

After - iiiventory Clea rane
With several winter months still ahead, in this event we are closing out all
odd lots, broken size ranges and all things with a tinge of winter at decisive
price reductions. Here are immeasurable opportunities for worthwhile sav-
ings. Choose early and be rewarded with best selections of these highly desir-
able and useful articles for you, your children, your home.
ALL SALES FINAL. 'NO APPROVALS. NO EXCHANGES.
NO TELEPHONE ORDERS AND NONE C. O. D.

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Mary Johnson headed the committee For meandering around campus,
for the list of patrons and patron- after somebody gets big hearted and'
esses. cleans the walks, the wooden trend
Miss Sawyer and Douglas Gregory will still be dominant. Wooden clogs
did two exhibition dances, a waltz, with leather tops will soon be clop-'
and a foxtrot, and their own inter- Ping all over the diagonal. They are
pretation of the Little Apple. Jimmy very flattering to the foot, for they ,
Raschel and his orchestra played for make them look considerably short-
the dance. ' er.,
Two Programs Now Offered
To School Of Nursin Entrants,
Three-Year's Work Leads distinction of wearing white shoes
To Diplomla - Five-Year and stockings; and the narrow band
on the cap of the junior is replaced by
Course Includes Degree a wider one at this time. An inter-
esting traditional rite-which the
By ESTHER OSSER freshmen groan over at the time, but
The University of Michigan Hospit- delight in whentheir turn comes-
TlSholofNivrsiy owicignost-oalways takes place in conjunction
al School of Nursing now endorses two with this event. The night before the
programs of study which prospective seniors get their new white shoes, they
entrants may follow. assign freshmen to clean and shine
One course, which is three years in their old black ones. Needless to say,
length, leads to the Diploma ,of Nurs-
ing; teohr h ieya obnc a most vigilant eye is kept on the
ithe other, the five-year combined "prelims" during this process. The'
curriculum in Letters and Nursing, following day, on receipt of the new
given in conjunction with the College shoes, the old ones are burned in for-
of Literature, Science, and the Arts, mal ceremony.
leads to a Diploma in Nursing and a S
Bachelor of Science degree. Stude desirin toiobtain t e-
During the first semester's work, gree of Bachelor of Science in the lit-
in the three-year instruction period, erary college and the Diploma in
the student spends the major part of Nursing from the nursing school may,
her time in the classrooms, where she by qualifying for the Combined Cur-
receives intensive tutelage in the basic riculum in Letters and Nursing, short-
sciences, such as anatomy, bacteriol- en by 15 months the time required to
ogy, and chemistry, and in the theory earn both honors.
and practice of nursing. At the end Cultural Background Important
of this preliminary period, if the stu- The aim of this course is to give the
dent has attained the required num- student, in her first three years, an
ber of honor points, she receives her introduction to the general cultural
cap, and is then an accepted member subjects that are considered funda-
of the school. This year the cere- mental in any college training, to give
mony will take place Friday, Feb. 10. her a good foundation in the sciences,
. Long Day For Sophomores j(and to have her take advantage of all1
The sophomore carries, in addition the social opportunities of college life.
to four hours of classes each day, The fourth and fifth years are de-
four hours of hospital duty. This voted to fundamental professional
clinical training consists of experience training in the University hospital.
in the various "services" or depart- Courses in theory are accompanied by
ments of the hospital to which the actual practice secured in a rotating
student is assigned. Her classroom service in the various clinical depart-
work is devoted to such theoretical ments of the hospital. In this way,
and "background" subjects as sociol- each student becomes familiar, as in
ogy. psychology, history of nursing the three-year course, with the va-
and ethics. In October, again if hon- rious methods of establishing and
or points are up to standard. the maintaining health, becomes ac-
nurse is given the band for her cap quainted with every type of patient,
which makes her a junior. and a wide variety of diseases, and
This next period is of a year's dura- gains the skill necessary for meeting
tion, during which time, as is true the practical demands of her profes-
also of the previous year, only a sion.
month's vacation is granted. Ward The requirements for enrollment on
and class work now average about 44 a combined curriculum are at least
hours per week, with an approximate- 90 semester hours of credit, and a
Ly fiye-and-one-half-day week. record of good scholarship, which in
Freshmen Clean Shoes September, 1939, will mean at least
Senor students in Michigan's School two and three-quarters honor points
>f Nursing are allowed the envied per hour.

Doris Cranmuore Enters
Women's Bowling Finals
Doris Cranmore, '4OEd, defeated
Jeanne Goman, '40, to enter the finals
of the women's singles bowling tour-
nament. She will oppose the winner
of the match between Marion Weiss,
'40Ed, and Ellen MacDonald, '40,
in the finals.
The bowling alleys will. be open
during final examinations and be-
tween semesters, Jeanette Stickels,
'40, bowling manager, announced.

Train for DEFINITE
EMPLOYMENT
Where All Graduates
Have Been Placed.
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
William at State Ph. 7831

COATS and SUITS
MARVELOUS VALUES in FUR-TRIMMED COATS

3 Coats, 79.98 each -- Mink
trim, size 40; Kohinsky trim,
size 242. Silver Fox trim,
size 14.

10 Coats, 59.98 each - Black
wool with fur trim that in-
cludes sPeri'an, Mink, Silver
Fox, Kolinsky.

Eyes Admire - Hearts Applaud
Here is beauty for women to envy. ' Loveliness for
men to worship - A new hair do by Groomwell.
Permanents of loveliness.
GROOMWEL L BEAUTY SHOPS
1205 So. University 615 East Liberty
* /

39 COATS... 39.98 each
All sizes in dress and sports types. Fine black> wools,,natural
and colored wools. Furs include: Persian, Silver and Blue
Fox, Leopard, Beaver, Skunk, Raccoon.
12 COATS. .4.13 SUITS
Forrmerly 29.75 to 45.00 each

Untrimmed coats and suits for misses
and women. Fine wool fabrics in black,
brown and colors.

$1698 ea.

NEW TERM

SPORTS SHOP
8 Knit Dresses, 10.99 each - One
and two-piece Socony knits.
Black, wine, rust,. teal, multi-
colored stripes. Women's sizes.
18 Better Blouses; 3.98 each . .
Tailored and dressy styles.
7 Jackets, 5.98 each -- Suedes and
monotone tweeds.
12 Wool Skirts, 3.98 each.
33 Raincoats and Utility Coats,
3.98 each - Trench coats, rubber-
ized silks included.
Skigand Skating
Clothes 20% Less
12 Gabardine Ski Suits, formerly
25.00.
5 Wool Ski Suits, formerly 15.00.
18 Heavy knit Sweaters, formerly
5.00 and 6.50.
3 Skating Dresses, formerly 25.00
. Flannel and jersey,
3 Velveteen Skating Dresses, for-
merly 20.00.
Also heavy knit socks, 'mittens,
caps, angora parkas, plaid skirts.
Sweaters 3.98
Long - sleeved slipovers. Short
sleeved angoras and fine zephyr
knits. Tyrolean sweaters with
gay embroidery. A few wool car-
digans. Pastel and dark colors.

11

FUR COATS

9 Muskrat Coats, 79.50 to
149.50 - Natural, silver and
mink-dyed. Formerly 125.00
to 225.00.

4 Caracul Coats, 98.50 to
129.50 - Black, eel grey and
natural. Formerly 150.00 to
185.00.

VALENTINES

Ic to

35c

1*V)\

6 NORTHERN SEAL COATS
39.98 to 59.98
Formerly 69.50 to 100.00
Lustrous Northern Seal in full and three-quarter length
coats. Fitted and boxy styles.

:/

1 Box "Make Your Own" . 25c
Place Cards, Talleys,
Seals, Table Covers and Napkins

1 Laskin Mouton Coat, 59.98.

1 Natural Skunk Coat, 159.50
-Size 16.

,.. ,

Stto MAYER-SCHAIiER CO.
Stahiwners ::Printers ::Binders ,

Office Out fitters

Phone 4515

112 South Main

.'&N,.\'&NAAA' ; N\-N..x ,Nv, . . A.. .A., . '. , a ,

UN

SECOND FLOOR
10 Hostess Robes, 3.98 each-Satin,
brocade, silk crepe, printed silk.
5 Lounging Pajamas and Match-
ing Coats, 8.98 a set.
3 Flannel Robes, 6.98, each, 3 Two-
piece Printed Silk Lounging Pa-
jamas, 4.98 a pair.
20 Flannel Robes, 6.98 and 7.98
each.
60 Flannel and Balbriggan 2-piece
Pajamas, 79c a pair.
27 Balbriggan Gowns, 1.19 each.
Lingerie. 1.69 to 4.98 apiece -
Gowns, slips, petticoats, chemises.
Formal styles included., Some
handmade garments. Many with
lace trim. Materials include silk
crepe, satin, taffeta. -
Odd Pieces Lingerie, 59c a piece.
7 Kay Dunhill Dresses, 498 each.
40 Brassieres, 1.19 each.
Girdles, Corsettes, Corselettes, 1.98
to 7.98 each.
Odd Pieces, 39c each - Sanitary
belts, garter belts, shoulder straps.

Three Groups of FormaIs
6'at 16 at 8 at
$9.98 eo.$14x.98 ea. $1 Q.98 ea .
Pencil-slim and full-skirted models. Jacket dresses. Formal
evening styles. Dinner dresses. Satins, crepes, taffetas, chif-
fons. Net, lace, rhinestone. bead and sequin trimming on
many. Reds, turquoise, violets, blues, blacks, white.
CLEARANCE of DAYTIME DRESSES
22 Dresses at 5.00 each
Wools, crepes. Dressy and tailored styles. Maternity dresc es.
Blues, rust, reds, green, purple, black.

ATTEND THE

President's flall

22 Dresses at 10.00 each
Silks, wools, lam6s. Maternitydresses included.
wine, red, blue, violet, black.

Teal blue,

MONDAY, JAN: 30

BILL BOYD
and his
ORCHESTRA

BILL SAWYER
anid his
ORCHESTRA

20 Dresses at 15.00 each
Pastel wools, crepes, matelass6, velvet. Dressy and tailored
styles. Black, blues, plum, rose, aqua, beige. Maternity
dresses included.

. ...__,..,,. ,_ o

I.

II

at

at

NEW SPRING DRESS-UP HATS
Gay Little Hats

:9

Ii

MASONIC TEMPLE
BALLROOM

MICHIGAN UNION
BA LLROOM

SHOE CLEARANCE
93 Pairs Daniel Green Slip- 206 Pairs Galoshes, 69ce,1
pers, 98c, 1.98, 2.98 a pair- 1.98 a pair-Snap and zi p
Black, blue, brown kid. Col- styles. Shuglove zippers, u
ored satins. Leather and trimmed velveteen m t
padded soles- boots. Brown and black.

980,
pper
fur-
iotor
C.

ALL REMAINING
WINTER* HATS
1.00 and 2.00 each
Formerly 3.00 to 10.00

4Vti ITlpI1

1-1 c

', .1 J, AM

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