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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 19, 1939 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T fl E Ai i c" ti 1 ty A TNI D A, I f, y

'1iFiUIi "It -)e i :i 'N, i; ,

Po~try Called Jazz

=imam*

Doaclas Tracy. Poetr:yCaled Jazz
Douds Trcy _Of 'ocal Muscles
Picked To Head oy Pof.Imiyskes
Bk EXChange ByELIZABETH M. SHAW
Poetry is the jazz of the speech
Student: Workers Chosen muscles, ciaims Prof. John H. Muy-1
By Conmmitee; Book skens of the phonetics department
Sale TH Open Feb. 3 after reviewing experiments of George
R. Pflaum, Grad. now being studied
Douglas 'tracy. '40E, has been ap- by Adeline Pierce, Grad.
-pointed msiager of the student book Speech is developed from the nor-
exchange " hich opens Friday, Feb. mal processes of chewing, sucking and'
3, in the r.sorth lounge of the Union, swallowing, Professor Muyskens de-
it was anp -unced yesterday by the Glared. The theory that the nearer
executive committee in charge of ex-,to the pattern of these vegetative
chp ge em:.loyment. functions the words are formed, the
The commnittee, composed of repre- Imore pleasing will be the result to
sentatives from the Union and : the listener, is now being investigat.
League, cc-sponsors, as well as the ied. The department has also de-
offices of the' Dean of Women and veloped the theory that if you have a
the Dean of Students, also an- language you will have a mind, thus
nounced that the following students antithesizing the theory generally
had been seected to work in the ex- held..
change: Madeleine Kreighoff, 40; Results of an analysis of thou-
Harriet Pomeroy, P39, Jean Holland, sands of mouth movements made by
'39, Norma Curtis, '39, Janet Fullen- Miss Hudson and investigated by
wider, '39, Barbara Griffin, '39, Jean Pflaum show that in speech 11 per
Ramsay, '40, Jane Hart, '40, Louise 'cent of the movements are produced
Garden, ' .1A, Mary Ellen MacCready, by the lips, 67 per cent on the tip of
'41, Wilma Cope, '40, Ella Cafle, the tongue and the rest on the back
'40Ed, and Nancy Mickelsen, '40. of the tongue. Considering that theI
Also to 'e employed for the ex- j muscles which are the most flexible
change 'were: Robert Ulrich, '41; 'and produce the most movements are
Jame's Palmer, '41; Thomas Adams, the last to develop, one can readily
'40; Donald Counihan, 41; Marvin see how a young person whose tongue
Reider, '3,; Marshall Brown, '40; tip doesn't develop is greatly handi-
John Spencer, '41E; Paul Beard, '40E; capped, he said.
Harvey Sparks, '40; Herman Erke, In poetry, on the other hand, only
'41; Howe rd Egert, '40; Jerome Cow- 53 per cent of the movements in pro-
en, '40; HaRold Voegelin, '42; Herbert nunciation are produced on the tip of'
Rackoff, Grad.; David Panar, '40E; the tongue, 20 per cent on the lips
and Lawrence Gubow, '40. and 6.3 on the back. This fact that
Tracy arnounced that there would the shift in frequency type of move-'
be a meeAing of the book exchange ment is made, suggests that poetry
employes e t 4 p.m. Monday in the follows a more primitive pattern thanI
Union. Students who plan to apply conversational speech.
for the pos:on of exchange cashier If you know the type of poetry a
will be required to take an examina- person likes, Miss Pierce contends,
tion tonigh, :n the Union, he added, you can determine certain factors,
A list of the books needed for the about his personality. "Poetry con-
various ccises offered in the Univer- tains the rhythms of the poet," says i
sity is now being compiled. I Miss Pierce.

Gopher Goalie Once Scored A Goal

Marty Falk, University of Minnesota, goalie, is one of the few hockey4
r etmen who ever scored a goal himself. He turned the trick against -
Illinois recently when he was given a penalty shot and made it good.
Local Noas Braved Ann Arbor
Flood Tides 19 Years Ago Toda y
By RICHARD HARMEL their furnaces unwiorkable. Coughing,
Huge drifts of snow combined with sneezing and an increase in sore
torrential rains resulting iroir a throats saw the health authoritiesf
freakish change in weather brought predict a rise in pneumonia.
a miniature flood to file Michigan S.t
campus 19 years ago today. ISeveral far sighted students, dis-
Ambitious custodians who had mayed at the increasing flood waters,
carefully banked two-feet high drifts wired frantic messages to Ypsilanti
'ordering, cajoling and praying for
away from the sidewalk saw them theimm, dlig on ra go a
melt and form a miniature lake to- the immediwte delivery of anoes and
gether with the rain. Students who small sized power boats so that they
had delighted in sloshing through the could attend classes in the morning.
inch deep water were forced to ac- Gay hearted Lotharios who were1
quire hip boots as the unceasing determined to let neither fire nor7
downpour began to invade cellars. water stand in the way of their Mon-;

I Prof. Morrison
Defines Traffic
LI oi ~tBeitef 4s,
By KARL KESSLER
The placing of traffic lights at in-
tersections where conditions do not
warrant their use, is a definite cause
of accidents and a menace to safety,
Prof. R. L. Morrison, of the highway
engineering department, said yester-
day.
Extensive investigations made by
traffic engineers show that an in-
tersection must meet certain mini-
mum conditions before the instal-
lation of a stop and go light will be a
positive safety factor. First, the vol-
ume of traffic must be at least 1,000
cars per hour for eight hours each
day, and second, the cross traffic
must carry not less than 25 per cent
of the total traffic through the in-
tersection.
"Those signals which meet these
rec'-irements," Professor Morrison
qualified, "should be operated only
when traffic is heavy enough to war-
rant their use. At all other times
they should be used as an amber'
blinker. This is preferred to turning
them off entirely," he explained,
"since it avoids confusion among
drivers."
Unnecessary traffic signals, he
pointed out, usually, increase the
number of accidents at an intersec-
tion.
One Day Left To Enter
Radio Script Contest
Only one day remains to enter the
radio script contest which offers a
prize of $25 for the best 45 minute
radio program dealing with some
aspect of the University, Prof. Waldo
M. Abbot, director of the University
Broadcasting Service, warned yes-
terbay.
All scripts must be turned ,in to
Morris Hall by tomorrow. The win-
ning program or parts of it will be
broadcast nationally, March 18, over
the Columbia Broadcasting System
in commemoration of the anniversary
of the founding of the University in
Ann Arbor.

Frank Kluekhohn (above) cor-
respondent for the New York Times
at Mexico City, left the city by
planeafter receiving ordersyfrom
the Mexican Department of Inter-
ior to quit the country.
Helen Byrn Gives
Graduation Recital

'Times' Man Ousted

i

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(XmL.inued from Page 4)
Electric Company, Nela Park En-
gineering Department, on Friday, Jan.
20 at 4:10 p.m. in Room1246 West En-
gineering Building.
The rapid rise to favor of titis type
of lighting, for decorating the build-
ing as well as for seeing, makes this
opportunity to hear a competent spe-
Cialist particularly valuable. All in-
terested are welcomed.
Student Book-Exchange: The fol-
lowing students have been selected
for work:
Madeline Krieghoff
Harriet Pomeroy
Jean Hoand
Janet Fullenwider
Norma Curtis
Barbara Griffin
Jean Ramsay
Jane Hart
Louise Garden
Mary Ellen MacCready
Wilma Cope
Ella Carle
Nancy Mikelson
Robert Ulrich
Jim Palmer
Tom Adams
Marvin Reider
Don Counihan
Paul Beard
Marshall Brown
John Spenser
Harvey Sparks
Herman Erke
Howard Egert
Jerry Cowan
Harold Voeglin
Herman Rackoff
David Panar
Larry Gubow
The:e will be a meeting of all Book-
Exchange workers Monday, Jan. 23,
at 4 p.m. in Room 302 of the Michi-
gan Union.
Reading To Run
Justice Harry W. Reading, '06, an-
nounced yesterday that he would seek
reelection to his third four-year term
on the Republican ticket at the pri-
mary election March 6. The regular
spring election will be held April 3.

Helen E. Byrn, 39SM, of Ann Ar-
bor, played a piano graduation re-
cital at 8:15 p.m. yesterday in the
School of Music Auditorium.
A student of Prof. Joseph Brink-
man of the piano department of the
School of Music, Miss Byri played
the following program: Bach's "Par-
tita II in C minor"; "Toccata e Fuga,"
by Frescobaldi-Respighi; Brahm's
"Variationem, Op. 21, No. 1."
Three Doctors To Aptend '
Medical Parley In South
Three University Hospital repre-
sentatives are traveling to the meet-
ing of the American Association of
Orthopedic Surgeons this week in
Memphis, Tenn.
Dr. Frederick A. Coller, chairman
of the surgery department, will read
a paper entitled, "Water Balance in
Orthopedic Surgery," Dr. Homer H.
Stryker of the surgery department
will sponsor a special exhibit of
frames for fractures.

Landlords leaped at the opportuni-t
ty to cut off heat, claiming that the
water had gone so far as to make

CLASSIFIED ADVERT

day night visits to their lady loves
sloshed through water reported to be
knee deep. Once in the warm living
rooms, according to the Jan. 19 issue
of the Daily, they refused to talk
about the weather for fear of losing
controi of their speech.
Erroneous claims of touching terra
firma beneath the swirling waters
were discounted when the claimants
were discovered to have worn stilts.

FOR RENT
FOR RENT--Attractive warm rooms
for men with or without meals. 914
Hill St., Phone 4546. 305
FOR RENT--Conveniently located,
single roonm for girl in graduate
house. 222 S. Ingalls, opp. Michi-
gan Leagi '-. 298
FOR RENT---Fine large rooms, dress-
ing room tile bath, for graduate'
students.. all 2-2102 or 2-2571. 310
FOR RENT--Comfortable inexpen-
sive doubl,- or single. With oppor-
tunity for occupants to work for
part of boprd. 523 Packard. 308
E OR REN'-Desirable single room in
private h-mme. 908 Lincoln Ave.
Reasonable. Inquire 4004 Nat. S.
1-5 p.m. 312
FOR RENT --For next semester, a
double roomn for rent. 518 Monroe.
Price reascrnable. 329
FOR RENT--Attractive single room,,
clean and neat, newly furnished,
shower, sneam heat, comfortably
warm. Call 7796. 293
FOR RENT-2nd semester cheerful
south rcoia reasonably priced. 930
Dewey. Phone 7319. 318
FOR RENT--Only $3. Desirable suite
and sirn, le rooms for men, 2 blocks
from pa-mius. Phone 9543. 320
FOR RENT-Attractive singles and
suites for quiet students. Steam
heat, oil burner, shower. 928 Church
St. 322
FOR RENY --Modern 4 room apart-
ment, very attractive. Phone 7831
or 4627. 326

FOR RENT-To a graduate man
student. Front single room, clean
and quiet. 1213 Forest, call 4667.
327
WANTED - TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. 5th Avenue. Phone 2-2935
or 2-1416. 79'
TYPING-Reasonable rates. L. M.
Heywood, 414 Maynard St., phone
5689. 271
TYPING at re~asonable, rates. Mrs.'
Howard, 613 Hill St., dial 5244. 176
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Saturday afternoon. Senior
proof pictures from Dey Studio for
'Ensian. If found please return to
D. Staebler Phone 5940 or 2-3241.
LOST--One strand of pearls on Tues-
day somewhere on Campus and
State St. Call Janet at 7225. 323
LOST--Pair of binoculars bearing1
name below. Reward offered. Jack
MacLeod, 1601 Washtenaw, phone
7142. 325
LOST-Green Shaeffer fountain pen
on Diagonal Saturday. If found
please call Lee at 2-2569.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE--Tux, size 38 regular,
like new, price very reasonable.
Phone 4852. 328
MI UELLANEOUS
WANTED-Apartment close to Lawf
Club desired for J-Hop weekend.'
Please address Box 10. 297
WASHED SAND and Grave1 .Drive-

way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company, Phone 7112. 17
PAPERHANGER-Craftsman, cap-
able fine paper work. Dial 7209. 181
CASH PAID for your discarded
clothing. Claude Brown, 512 S.
Main. 311
WILL EXCHANGE lessons in Ger-
man for instruction in English pro-
nounciatin. Write box 6 Michigan
Daily. 314
EXPERIENCED_ cook, houseman,
good reference. Consider anything.
Phone 2-2482. 321
WANTED-Girl to share attractive
apartment with two others. Good
location, reasonable. Phone 2-2165.
319
J-HOP furniture for rent. Call 3670.
Alexander's, 417 E. Liberty. 324
LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 9
SILVER LAUNDRY
907 Hoover Phone 5594
Free pickups and deliveries
Price List
All articles washed and ironed.
Shirts.....................14j
Undershirts ................. .04
Shorts ..................... .04
Pajama Suits.''........'...10
socks, pair .................. .03
Handkerchiefs .............. .02
Bath Towels ................. .03
All Work Guaranteed
also special prices on Coed's laun-
dries. All bundles done separately.
No markings. Silks, wools our
specialty.

BENIAMI1NO

GIGLI

Will Give a Recital

:i

TONI G H T, 8:30 P.M.
in H ill Auditorium
Mr. Gigli will be heard instead of Kirsten Flagstad
unable to come - Please present for admission Coupon
Number 4, reading "FLAGSTA D.
"The return of Beniamnino Gigli the golden-voiced idol of concert plat-
form and 0wra house is the most exciting event of the musical season."

11

. .m i wn i. .ru..ri

Ill.

Tickets at Office of School of Music

1

.

r

HIGH

QUALITY

.LOW

PRICE

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'The

ICHGANENSIAN

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