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January 13, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Children's Aid
Group Places
120_Orphans
Psychological And Hospital
Destitute Cases Given
Homes By Society
(Editor's Note: This is the last in a
series of articles discussing the vari-
ous sociological research, service and
training groups in Ann Arbor.).
Striving to give orpnaned children
a normal life, the Michigan Children's
Aid Society provided for more than
120 children during 1938, a statistical
report revealed yesterday.
The Society, which receives cases
from the University Hospital and has,
the Psychological Clinic of the Insti-
tute for Human Adjustment do most
of its psychological work, provides
homes for these children who would
otherwise be destitute, or in unfit
hands.
A number of them are placed in
boarding houses maintained by the
Society, but the majority is placed
with foster parents, who must under-
go complete investigation before be-
ing allowed to make a legal adoption.
The Psychological Clinic of the
University, in this connection, ex-
amines the real mother of the child,
if she is living, and a report is then
furnished the prospective parents who
are at least assured that the child is
of intelligent parents.
In additionrtothese services the
Society cares for children who are
delinquent but did not deserve being
sent to an institution. They are placed
in special boarding houses under the
supervision of a child expert.
The Society also works with num-
erous other institutions in solving
their child care problems, and offers
them its state-wide investigation ser-
vices.
Morgan Meets Alumni
Robert O. Morgan, assistant gen-
eral secretary of the University Alum-
ni Association meets with three
University alumni groups this week-
end. From yesterday's meeting of
medical alumni in Gary, Ind., he will
attend a meeting tonight with medi-
cal alumni in Chicago and meets with
the general alumni club of Milwaukee
Monday.

Sharecroppers Protest Working Conditions In Missouri

Library Keeps
File Of Exams
In 202 Courses

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
FRIDAY, JAN. 13, 1939
VOL. XLIX. No. '79

11 1 Notice to Men Students: For the
Files of examinations in 202 courses information of men students living
offered in the literary college are now tin approved rooming houses, the first
available to students in the first floor semester shall end on Thursday, Fe.
study hall in the main library build- 9 and the second semester shall be-
ing, gin on the same day.
isgd Ie Students living in approved room-
The files which includes copies of ing houses, who intend to move to
quizzes and midsemester and final different quarters for the second
examinations cover principally the semester, should give notice in writ-
social and physical sciences, Ian- ing to the Dean of Students before
g4:30 on Thursday, Jan. 19, 1939. Per-
mathematics. mission to move will be given only to

Claiming they were confronted with eviction notices; nearly 1,000 sharecroppers in the area near Sikeston,
Mo., packed belongings and left their rickety homes to camp in the open air (some are shown,) in makeshift
shelters and tents along 100 miles of two major highways. The move was said to be a mass protest against
working conditions. Three-fourths of the camping families were Negroes.

The examination library was op-
ened in May, 1937 after an intensive
campaign by interested members of'
the faculty and student body. The
primary purpose of the project is to
give independent students the ad-
vantage enjoyed by fraternity and so-
rority members who have access to
files in their houses.
Since its beginning the collection
has grown rapidly having added 127
examinations to the original number
of 75 in 1937. Its sponsors hope that
examinations will be contributed by
professors and students at the end
of each semester.
Lillian Rickel, librarian of the
I study hall, stressed especially the
! need for examinations in the fields of
anthropology, economics, physics,
French and German. Any one wish-

situtuents comiplying wiL
quirement.

'Trial By Jury'
Tryouts Held
Varsity Glee Club Tests
Prospective Singers
Tryouts for "Trial by Jury," Gil-
bert and Sullivan operetta to be pre-
sented )y the Varsity Glee Club in
conjunction with their coming con-
certs, were held at 7 p.m. yesterday in
the Union.
Tryouts for the same comic op-
eretta were held earlier in the semes-
ter, but since then it has been learned
that some of the roles will be left va-
caint withi the graduation of several
chosen leads at the end of the semes-
ter.
The concert series will be directed,
by Prof. David E. Mattern with John
Secrist, Grad., assistant in charge of
the operetta.
The finial concert schedule has note
yet been announced.

his re-

Local Auto Club Inaugurates Drive
To Lower Bicycle Accident Figure

ART CINEMA LEAGUE Presents .

~

III

Metropolitan Opera
Tenor Sensation
MARTA.EGGERTH
47f.t PUi HI'S
~~~GGRO" OPERA
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Box Office Open Thursday
Jan. 13=14 Fri. & Sat. at 8:15
AllSeats Reserved
Cold?
DON'T SHIVER - get new warmth and vigor by drinking
SUPERIOR HOT CHOCOLATE. Served piping hot
with whipped cream and wafers.

Student Cyclists Are Urged
To Install Lights And
Drive More Carefully
By NORMAN SCHORRK
Ann Arbor's 2,000 cyclists are be-I
coming an increasing menace to thel
safety of its citizens, and the local
branch of the Michigan Automobile
Club has begun a drive to eliminate
causes of bicycle accidents, William
Strickland, director of the Auto Club
and Prof. rRoger Morrison of the
highway engineering department, an-
nounced yesterday.
Although complete figures are not
avrilable at present on the number of
injuries and deaths resulting from
bicycle accidents in Ann Arbor, Pro-
fessor Morrison, who is chairman of
the local Traffic and Safety Division,
declared that the problem has be-
-come very acute of late. Cyclists, a
largenumber of whom are University
students, have been very careless in
their traffic violations.
Twenty per cent of these accidents
result when the automobile driver is
not able to see night cyclists, who
travel without lights, he explained.
A very large number of these acci-
dents are caused by "double riding"
and passing carelessly at intersections,
Mr. Strickland pointed out. He cit-
ed examples of mishaps caused when
cyclists did not watch cars at "stop"
streets, rode by swiftly without sig-
naling the driver in any way.
A city ordinance forbids riding on
sidewalks, Professor Morrison said,
but this provision is flagrantly vio-
lated as well is the ban on cycling
more than two abreast.
University officials announced re-
cently that they would enforce the
Board of Regents order, forbidding
bikes on campus. Parking stands for
the bicycles are being constructed at
the outer points.
The auto club officials recommend-
ed that students adopt the following
code issued by the State Auto Club
as a guide in their cycling:
1. Two on a bike is one too many.
2. All traffic lights and other traf-
fic signals apply to bicycles.
EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

olZi ar , mens .onorary fencing
society, added four new members to
its roster last night at a meeting in
the Union.
Those considered well.. fitted to
maintain and advance interest in
fencing were Nick Longo, '41; Roy
Fairlamb. '42; Charles Fielder, '42.
and John Dreher, '42E.

deaux; those which were built with
their backs to the land; and the arti-
ficial harbor type found at Le Havre
and other large ports which are used
for heavy industrial work and naval;
bases.
READ THE WANT ADS

3. Dismount and walk across a ing to add to the file may do so by
congested intersection where there turning in his old examinations at
are no traffic lights. the desk in the first floor study hall
4. When two or more bicycles are I
traveling abreast, they should travelFr
in single file when other traffic is Cercle Francais
approaching.
5. Always give a signal when turn- Hears DenkingerI
ing or stopping.
6. Do not ride on the sidewalk. Prof. Marc Denkinger of the French
7. Do not zigzag or cut circus stunts P
on the highway, department lectured on the "Ports of
8. Bicycles ridden to school should France" yesterday afternoon in the
always be parked at the rack pro- Romance Languages Building. The
vided for that Purpose. program was one of a series sponsored
by the Cercle Francais.
Scmnitar Takes In Fob r According to Professor Denkinger,
i A T e n Fthe French have a harbor system com-
Fencers As New Members prising three types of harbors: those
'r imitavtfound in such old towns as Bor-

Seniors: College of L.S. and. A.,
School of Education, School of For-I
estry and Conservation, and School
of Music: Tentative lists of seniors
have been posted on the bulletin
board in Room 4, U.Hall. If your
name does not appear, or, if included
there, it is not correctly spelled, please
notify the counter cerk.
The Bureau has received notice of
the following Michigan Civil Service
Examination:
Cosmetology inspector. Salary range
$115-135. Open to women only. Date
for filing of applications: Jan. 16.
Complete announcement is on file
at the Bureau of Apointments and
Occupational Information, 201 Mason
Hall: Office hours: 9-12 and 2-4.
Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information.
Academic Notices
Honors in French: Students who are
(Continueed on Page 4)
Xi Psi Phi Donates Bench
In commemoration of the 50th an-
niversary of its founding, Xi Psi Phi,
dental fraternity, will install a con-
crete memorial bench in the south-
west corner of the main campus near
the walk leading from University Hall
to President Ruthven's home. The
date of installation has been set for
Feb. 8.

YOUR PROBLEMS SOLVED!
We prepare scholarly book reviews,'
debates, essays, papers, speeches,
graduation theses. Any subject
promptly. 50c per typed page. Also
translations (All languages) rea-
sonably. Expert Research Co., Box
36, Jackson., Ga,

0-

Daily Repoiters
Find Pro Tennis
Stars Talkative
(Continued from Page 1)
Cramm, German tennis ace, who has
been concentrating in concentration
camp instead of his forehand, would
turi pro, Don replied:
"No, definitelynot. They won't ven
let him play amateur. It's too bad,
too. He's a helluva swell guy. He in-
tends to enter some banking house."
The troupe, including Bruce B -.rnes
and Dick 'keen, moves on to Minne-
apolis tonight for another one night
stand. After that, they go west and
south, ending up in the East and
possibly going to Europe. An attend-
ant stuck his head in the door, hol-
lered "OK boys, you're on."
Budge got up, combed his mass of
red hair and went out to down Vines
in three sets.
Plane Sc-vice Halted
By (r >r Of Franco
LONDON, Jan. 12 '. )--The Daily
Herald said today tha, plans for a
British air serv ice; from. ondon to
South America had been a ncloned
because General Francisco Franco re-
fused to permit British airways to
fly over Spanish Insurgent territory.
There was no official confirmation
that negotiations had been broken off
with General Franco, however:.
DANCING
-Armory-
Auspices of Company K
TONIGHT and
Saturday j
HERB "RED" RITZ
and his band.
Every Friday and Saturday.

m

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SUPERIOR DAIRY STORE
332 South State 207 South Main
This may be NEWS
to some U. of M. instructors
When bills pile up, and the required payments take
too much of your income, you can wipe the slate
clean with a loan from Personal. No co-signers or
endorsers. No credit inquiries of friends, colleagues,
or superiors. We welcome an application from any
one, except a student, who can repay small monthly
amounts, but who may not have the kind of security
usually required elsewhere.

p

376 offices in 28 Stater
Ground Floor Wolverine Building
Phone 4000
10th year in Ann Arbor
201.203 S. Fourth Avenu
R. W. Hrn, Manager

FINANCE COMPANY

6:00
6:30
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6:00
6:30
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k

WJR
Stevenson News
The Inside of Sports
Vocal Varieties
Jack Haley
First Nighter
Burns and Alien
Hollywood Hotel
Grand Central Station
Pity Yard' Line Review
News
Leighton Noble's Orchestra
Casino of the Stars
Dick BarWie's orchestra
wj

LIM

BEN IAMI NO

GI LI

I

Last Times Tod
Wiggins' "MOTHER

CAREY'S CHICKENS"

Kate Douglas

Tyson's Sports
Bradcast..
Amos 'n' Andy
The Black Ace
Cities Serv ceHoar
waltz Time
Death Valley Days
Lady Esther Serenade
Story Behind the Headlines
Newcast
Hotel Statler Orchestra
webster Hall Orchestra
NBC Dance. Music
C KLW
Stop and Go
Exciting Moments
Answer
House of Hospitality
Chansonette
Symphonic Strngs
The Crimson Wizard
Opportunity
Canadian Legion
Jazz Nocturne
Canadian Club Reporter
Nation's Playhouse
Sammy Kaye's orchestra
Bob Crosby's Orchestra
WXYZ
Day in Review
Benny Ky.te orchestra
Artie Shaw's Orchestra
The Lone Ranger

I

Wil

I

I

Give

a Recital

r. ,

t=

STARTING SATURDAY1

(

THURS. JAN. 19,8:30 P.M.
in Hill Auditorium
Mr. Gigli will be heard instead of Kirsten Flagstad
unable to come - Please present for admission Coupon
Number 4,, reading "FLAGSTAD."
"The refurno f Beniainn Gi-l th> iolnvoi dol of ulnia nfl r hI.at.

M t d polia01O ,R

- - ..i U

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II I7~2"'

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