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January 06, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICklGcAN DAILY

Reform Group1
Hits Problems
Modernization Commission
Attacked Party System
In Its Final Summaries
Two salient questions, both to
which the present answer is no,
formed the basis upon which the
Commission on Modernization and
Reform of Government attacked the
problem of elections and political
parties. These questions, first, are
the voters of Michigan in control of
their government, and second, are
the adherents to our political party
in control of their parties, were con-
sidered in the final report of the
commissions investigation in Lan-
sing, Dec. 20.
The commission asserted that the
present electoral system places an
unbearable burden on the voters. In
many districts the individual is asked
to vote at least twice a year from a
long list of candidates running for
some 25 different offices on three dif-
ferent planes of government, na-
tional, state and local. They must
vote for certain important adminis-
trative officers as well as the policy-
framing officials. They are obliged
also to elect judges, and further still,
to pass upon proposed statutes and
constitutional amendments of State
and local concern.
The difficulties worked by this
type of system, the report implied,
can be mirrored in the fact that pop-
ular participation in many elections
is low. This is especially apparent
in primary elections. Also in the
realization that the vote for lesser
officers is usually from one-third to
one-half that for more important
ones., The ballot is so large that it is
difficult to handle in the voting booth,
and particularly in Detroit where it is
so, large as to render the use of vot-
ing machines impossible; Some of
the minor offices are often filled by
default, and unqualified candidates
may be elected in the confusion.
With regard to the political party
members and their control of their
organizations, it was felt by the
commission that. Michigan owns the
most complicated system for the se-
lection of members of party com-
mittees and the conduct of party af-
fairs. Nomination in the primary,
selection by county convention and
the caucus systems are .all still used
currently in this state by the county
state electoral college respectively. So
complex in nature is the party or-
ganization that it defies manipula-
tion by any but experts. The result
is that the people is uninformed
concerning the operation of probably
the most vital element in modern
politics-the political party.

Navy-Department Tells Congress Of New Air Base Needs.

Two Local Volunteers In Spain
Scheduled To Talk Here Today

University Gardens
Serve Thisee Needs

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T PH/LAtt Ph!A NEW LONDON
A A (Hf5AffAXE
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ANA T. ::4IA
UNALASKA KOPIAK TPT AAS
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BAY AREA SAN }IEGO> S s OCA - w
AMIDWAY A
KANEOHE BAY
PEARL HARBOR=
MHAME

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4

WAKE

W - Three important functions are per-
(Continued from Page x) the photo was very slight. Cummins formed by the University Botanical
was a military runner for the Abra- Gardens on Packard Road. They
not fully recovered, and joined the am Lincoln Battalionprovide plant' material for research
Americans just before they left Spain Service drove a supply truck and work, decorations for hospital and
at the beginning of December. Irduniversity functions, and a collection
Cummins and Service, along with then an ambulance sent to Spain by of interest to botanists.
about 300 other American volunteers, American contributions until July, Besides these functions, the de-
were shipped in sealed cars through 1938 when he left the Ambulance partment has a large annual sum-
France to Havre where they were held corps to enlist in the infantry. He mer garden and by May the place is
virtual prisoners until the S.S. Paris was a close friend in Spain of James filled with experiments being per-
could be secured to take them home. Lardner, son of Ring Lardner, the formed by members of the botany de-
The Daladier Government claimed writer, who left his job as correspond- paitment. In November the seeds are
that this was necessary because of ent in Spain for the New York Her- harvested and from that time the
the general strike and the subse- ald Tribune to shoulder a gun for whole garden is represented by a
quent navigation strikes. The protest the Loyalists in the International catalogue of seed envelopes. Plants
of 15,000 seamen and longshoremen Brigade and was killed several weeks are always being grown for identifi-
who paraded in Havre to get the after Service was wounded. cation, however.
Americans freed went without avail.
'he Americans, however, refused to-
sail on the Paris, which was manned Last Tines Today -
by strike-breakers, until the French BOB HOPE - SHIRLEY ROSS "LITTLE TOUGH
Government threatened to prevent "THANKS FOR THE MEMORY" GUYS 1N SOCIETY"
the passage of other Americans" in
the future and the strike committee
advised them to acquiesce. STARTING

A JONSTQN

G.- . -'

PALMYRA
- ----
OCANTON

e~
C A

AIR BASES (URGENT)
OTHER AIR. BASES
SUBMARINE BASE
MINE BASE A
PESTRQYER. BASE g

FIJ Is

S AMOA
1'.ROSE

;AHITI

The Navy- Department told the 76th Congress, on its first clay in session, that itwas in urgent need of thirty
new air, sub arine, destroyer and mine bases at points shown on this map. Stars mark air base projects recom-
mended as most important, including expansion at Pensacola, Fla.
Proble m Facin ( U. S. Agriculture
Is Marketing Not Slack Production

Cummins was thought to be cap-'
tured last Spring when relatives in
Spokane, Wash., thought they recog-
nized him in a photo of prisoners in
Rebel Spain printed in a Spokane
paper. But when the Daily secured an
original print from World Wide
Photos, it was discovered that Cum-
mins' resemblance to the prisoner in
farm programs. When the granaries
are filled, farmers themselves de-
cide through democratic processes
whether marketing quotas enforced
by penalties shall go into effect. Un-
der the first Act the administration
applied this elective method as a
matter of discretion, but now the
principle has the specific mandate of
Congress.

SATURDAY!

MY-A~

I

-ORETTA RICHARD0
a WALTER BRENNAN
DOUGLAS DUMBS&LL "KAREN MORIY.MORONI OLSEN
---- Extra
NOVELTY -- NEWS
FIRST TIME KENTUCKY DERBY IN COLOR!

K

.(Countined from Page J)
sistance to further expansion; mar-
keting and distribution became the'
central factors in agrieultural econo-
my.
The central idea underlying the
Agricultural Adjustment Administra-
tion, expressed in various ways at dif-,
ferent times, is that agricultural in-
come must be substantially raised and
thereafter maintained, not as mere
relief for the farmer but as a means
of improving the stability of the
whole economic system and promot-
ing the nation's progress.
Adjustment in the farmer's pecuni-
airy position was not conceived in
AAA philosophy as being brought
about merely by government fiat or
subvention. Agricultural adjustment
meant the introduction of such
changes in the operative process as
would put the farmer's improved in-
come on a firm economic foundation.
Inthe first emergency, the AAA
programs envisaged. primarily crop
curtailment, with soil" conservation as
a by-product. As explained by Secre-
tary Wallace, the reduction program
had three objectives: the absorption
of extraordinary carry-overs with
their burdensome charges and price-

depressing effects; the reduction of
current market supplies to the extent
necessary to bring prices to parity;
and the subsequent continuous or
intermittent imposition of production
restrictions to hold prices at parity.
A secondary but very important
tenet of AAA philosophy was that,,
even in the absence of any control of
actual production of farm commodi-
ties, controls of various sorts could
be introduced into the process of
market distribution which would en-
hance farmer's returns.
While the AAA sought to adjust
agricultural income indirectly through
adjustment of either the productive
process of the marketing process, it
did not limit itself to these devices
but relied also on direct income sup-
pliments.
Of the new aspects of the Agricul-
tural Adjustment Administration, em-
bodied in the Farm Bill of 1938, the
most. important is the ever-normal
granary plan. The concept of the ever-
normal granary, a logical develop-
ment from the early adjustment
policy, promotes jointly the interest
of producer and consumer though
means that are intended to protect
both parties-namely, the reciprocal

action of acreage adjustment and
crop storage.
In the ever-normal granary pro-
gram there is room, its proponents
claim, for expansion of farm output.
It rejects the earlier AAA notion
that farm welfare always requires
acreage reduction and looks instead
to the production of different crops
in the proper amounts and propor-
tions.
Another important aspect of the
new act is the safeguards written in
it for democratic procedure in the
working out and administering the
- _ _ _ _ _

CORRECTION

In our advertisement yesterday.
Two items should have read:
50c ZONITE .. . ...... 47c
50c WIX...............45c
We comply with the fair trade'
act. You can't buy for less
elsewhere.
MARSHALL DRUG

li _ __ ii

Classified l ry

H

II

FOR RENT

FOR RENT-3 rooms and bath with
use of kitchen in fine home one
miles from campus. Garage avail-
able. Call 2-2102. 278
FOR RENT-Five room furnished
apartment. Electrically. equipped.
Oil heated. 209 N. Ingalls. Phone
3403. 275
FOR RENT-Two apartments, each
with private bath and private en-
trance. Very close to campus,. reas-
onable rent. 1326 N. University.
Phone 6833. 273
WANTED-One or two men to share
apartment with two brothers. Con-
venient, comfortable, economical.
1326 N. University. Phone 6833. 274
LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 9
WANTED - TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. 5th Avenue. Phone, 2-2935
or 2-1416. 79

TYPING . at reasonable rates. Mrs.
Howard, 613 Hill St., dial 5244. 176
LOST and FOUND
FOUND-Man's strap wrist watch
before the Holidays. Call Heald at
4636. 276
LOST-Small gold cigarette case in
Wikel's drug store Wednesday. Re-
ward. Call 4782. 279
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Lodge's History of the
Nations; new, . 26 volumes, very
reasonably priced. Call 7725. 280
FR SALE-Fine large home near
campus, excellent. for fraternity.
. Call Mrs. William Giefel, 2-2571 or
2-2102 Brooks Newton Realty,
Inc. 277
MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company, Phone 7112. 17
PAPERHANGER-Craftsman, cap-
able fine paper work. Dial 7209. 181
RADIO SERVICE - BOB COLTEN
can handle your radio and record
problems. All makes repaired.
Phone 6327. 234

On Our St -geToday and Satukday
Attend Matinees
FAVORITE OF THE AIRWAYS 2000 SEATS
and star vocalist with Paul Whiteman's
original concert orchestra25

MEN

14 VERSATILE
MUSICIANS
in a Sparkling Show!

OF

EXOTIC
SONG STYLIST
and her
MUSRICl

TYPING-Reasonable rates.
Heywood, 414 Maynard St.,
5689.
ill .

L. M.
phone,
271

CAMPUS AT DRUG
218 S. State- NEXT TO GOLDMAN'S Phone 9392
FRIDAY -

Extra Added Attraction N
RADIO STAR OF WRIGLEY PROGRAMS
FA MOUS LYRIC TENOR
in Patel Whiteman's Carnegie Hall Concerts
TWO ADDED ACTS
DANCING AND NOVELTY
m--- --- Ontthe Screen --
MEET THE SCREWBALL-AND-CHAIN GANG!
warcen wants revolving
doors for the prison gate
PRSO OTRTONY MARTIN
PHYLLIS BROOKS
Slim SUMMERVILLE
ARTHUR TREACHER
ti Alan Dinehcart - Eddie Collins

Ic Pr ttes
t . 0 0

2 for

5caicmes Luckys
25C Chesters - Raeigh
Old Gofds- Spuds

1.13 cn.
Friday plus tax

III

50c Molle Shave Cream-29c

x
.. .. s

I

; ia i^''

I

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