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December 15, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Cordell Hull Arrives At Limy, With American Delegates In Tow1 Professors
Plan To.attend
istory Parley

Secretary of State Cordell Hull, (center foreground), accompanied by a battery of delegates, secretaries and
clerks, is shown as- he arrived at the Pan American con ference at Lima Peru. At left is Mrs. Hull and second
from left, front row, Senora Concha, wife of Dr. Carlos Concha, Peruvian foreign minister.
Rep. Bernard Ses Cost Of Diploma At Michiowan
Fascist Growth Here .,
Ranks 3rd Highest In Big Ten'
(Continued from Page 1)

I

spain, and blamed fascist influence 4
in the State Department for the con-
tinued application of the embargo in
spite of the opposition of 75 per cent
of the people, as demonstrated in a
poll by the Institute of Public Opin-j
ion :

Years In Ann Arbor Town
Raises Ante To $4,200

Life Insurance Co. of Milwaukee,
Wis., show.

National Historical Group
To Convene In Chicago
During Vacation Period
Thirteen members of the history
department plan to attend the Ameri-
can Historical Association meeting,
to be held in Chicago, Dec. 28, 29
and 30.
Included in the group will be pro-
fessors Arthur E. R. Boak, Arthur L.
Cross, Dwight L. Dumond, Arthur L.
Dunham, Howard M. Ehrmann, Al-
bert Hyma, Dwight C. Long, S. More-
ly Scott, Palmer A. Throop, Dr. John
W. Stanton and Mr. Karl H. Reich-
enbach.
Prof. Arthur, S. Aiton, who is on
leave this semester to do research'
work in California, will return to
Chicago in time for the meeting.
Professor Boak is a member of the
general program committee and is
chairman of the meeting on Roman
aistory. His group will discuss
"Changing Sanctions of the Roman
Imperial Power in the Third Cen-
tury, A.D."
The section discussion on English
iistory, of which Professor Cross is
chairman, will have as its topic,
"Politics and Religion in Modern Eng-1
land."
Professor Hyma is chairman of a
section on early modern Europe which
will discuss "The Humanism of the
15th and Early 16th Centuries and Its
Effect on the Rise of Nationalism."
Professor Watkins
Writes Pamphlet
I On Bank Reforms
Prof. Leonard L, Watkins of the
economics department analyzes the
general problem of banking reform,
with particular reference to programs
urged for adoption and steps already
taken in the diection of this reform,.
in a bulletin soon to be published
by the Bureau of Business Research.
Entitled "Commercial Banking Re-
form in the United States," the book
considers in detail alternate pro-
grams of reform, especially the so-
called "100 per cent plan," which was
recommended in the United States
after the banking crisis of 1933 and
subsequently endorsed by a good
many economists. On a basis of his
analysis, Professor Watkins con-
cludes that the "merits of the 100
per cent plan have been exaggerated,"
but stresses the fact that the peculi-
ar features of commercial banking re-
quire strict and comprehensive gov-
ernment regulation, if banking is to
continue in private hands.
Professor Watkins gives detailed
treatment of recent government
regulation of interest rates on de-
posits, appraising its significance in
view of the broad issues confronting
the banking system which he points
out earlier in the bulletin. The
book is illustrated with several tables
and charts.

Faculty Shows
Specialization's
Odd DivisionsI
Fertile sources of news are the}
special branches of learning of pro-
fessors at the University.
"Newspapermen, unlike the aver-
age student realize what a wealth
of specialized knowledge is to be
found in any great university," Prof.
Donal H. Haines, of the journalism
department, stated yesterday. 'No-
where else can one find experts in so
many fields so easily accesible as on
a college campus." he continued.
Questions on the Mayan calendar
should be referred to Dr. CarlE.
Guthe, director of University M4u-
sums, while advice on chronium
plating can be had from Prof. Ed-
win M. Baker, of the chemical en-
gineering department. Future rub-
ber planters in Sumatra should first
visit Prof. Carl D. LaRue, of the
botany department, and students in-
terested in the royal decrees of
Charles I. should consult Prof. Ar-
thur L. Cross, of the history depart-
ment.
Continuing in the same vein, Prof.
Felix W. Pawlowski, of the aeronau-
tical engineering department, is an
authority on physical properties of
airplanes; Dr. Melvin R. Gilmore, of!
the Museum of Anthropology,. knows
tribal customs of the American In-I
dian; and President Ruthven's spe-
cialty, second only to pedagogy, is
herpetology.
Hypotheses concerning the mea-
surement of sound cai be talked over
with Prof. Floyd A. Firestone, of the
physics department; the government
of the Philippine Islands is one of the
interests of Prof. Joseph R. Iayden,
of the political science department;
and research in rabies has been con-
ducted by Dr. Herbert W. Emerson of
the medical school.
Other fields of specializedj informa-
tion are land utilization, for which
Prof. Kenneth C. McMurry, of the
geography department, is recognized
nationally: long-range artillery, the
specialty of Prof. Edwin W. Miller, of
the engineering mathematics depart-
ment,

liliin"Isomessi

DAILY 2.-.4 - 7-9 P.M.
NOW! Today and Friday
Yvonne R Cecil* Marie
Anntte " Emeie
Their third feature pictc 4
and their best!
with
JEAN HERSHOLT
CLAIRE TREVOR
CESAR ROMER
Sc.*., of lb. Djon,. Qainlopet,
'ihaot.Phed ouidks i..the fecnie
svpxrrision of or. Alla tat ~fe
Executve Producer Sol M.Wurx.I
A 201t CenturyFox Pidu,.. m
Also
A Studio Made I
67 Stars Are In It!
"The World Is Ours"
NEWS OF THE DAY
Coming Saturday
BOB BURNS
"ARKANSAS TRAVELER"

Salvation Army Appeals
For Christnas Playthings
The Salvation Army, appealed yes-
terday to the residents of Ann Arbor
for unused toys to distribute to chtl-
dren who would otherwise be forgot-
ten at Christmas time. The toys
will be given out at a Christmas
party for underprivileged children.

t.

av
w(
TE
Nc
to
ye
pi
I

Least expensive of conference in-
For The Average Student stitutions are Minnesota and Indi-
By S. MITCHELL SWINTON ana where a bankroll of $3,200 will
suffice and it is possible to get by
A diploma from Michigan costs the with $2,200 and $2,600, respectively.
verage student $4,200, more than he A full course of study at Northwes-
ould have to pay at any other Big tern, on the other hand, necessitates
en university except Chicago or a reserve of 6,000 shining dollars. $4,-
orthwestern, a recent survey shows. 000 is the minimum figure there:'
A'iowing for board, room and full Chicago is second high with the
average expenditure hovering around
iition, the bare minimum for four the $4,800 mark and $3,840 consid-
tars here is $3,400, figures com- ered necessary if one cuts corners.
led by the Northwestern Mutual Average figures for other Big Ten
. y g yinstitutions are: Illinois, $4,000;
Iowa, $3,400; Ohio State, $4,000;
The Christmas Store Purdue, $4,000; Wisconsin, $4,000.
So-called "exclusive" eastern girls'
schools are by far the most costly in
the country, the survey shows. For
M's G ift $8,000 one can win a gold-plated edu-
M en SG if s 9 cation from Bryn-Mawr, while Vas-
I sar and Wellesley will each cast'' an
If you haven't decided what aura of respectibility upon feminine
to give "him", we believe our a shoulders for $7,200. Smith improves
i the mind for a mere $6,400.
store will furnish the inspir- Eastern men's schools also run
ation. ahead of coeducational institutions.
Average figures for Yale run to $6,-
600. Harvard provides an accent and
All gifts packed in Christmas a supposedly cultivated mind for $6,-,
Gift boxes. 400. Dartmouth runs to $6,000 as does
Cornell.
Neckwear - Jewelry Least expensive of the 90 leading
Shirts - Gloves aUniversities and colleges listed in the
Robes, Silk and Wool survey is Mississippi. There one
can bathe in a Southern sun and,
Pajamas - Hosiery incidentally, get an education for
Mufflers - Handkerchiefs only $1,311.

i

SEASON'S GREETINGS
from
LARMEE BATTERY

Leatlfer NoveltiesF
Smoking Jackets
etc. - etc.
THE DOWNTOWN STORE
FOR MICHIGAN MEN
- weerve mbSw
f * 49 QITNI MA TS

IClassified Directory

j IiD
As Na turd "Serves" It ..
ARBOR. SPR INGS
WATER
Delivered in the bottle for use in club,
house, or fraternity
Phone 8270

MARCH
OF
TIME

'.
_

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Furnished apartment.
Also extra roomnifdesired, 426 E.
Washington. Inquire at 422 E.
Washington. Phone 8544. 268
WANTED - TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. 5th Avenue. Phone 2-2935
or 2-1416. 79
TYPING at reasonable rates. Mrs.
Howard, 613 Hill St., dial 5244. 176
LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 9
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Boston Terrier puppies,
well marked, reasonably priced.
Phone 8195. 2411

LOST and FOUND
LOST-Silver bracelet on diagonal,
call 5700 at 6 p.m. Reward.
FOUND-Two dollars lost by a girl
purchasing Goodfellow Edition at
Law School Monday morning. Call
Mrs. Rogers 2-3241. 247
LOST-Sorosis pin on or near cam-
pus. Finder call Janet Martin, 8891.
Reward. 269
MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company, Phone 7112. 17
PAPERHANGER-Craftsman, cap-
able fine paper work. Dial 7209. 181
SITUATION WANTED -Excellent'
cook, now employed on campus, de-
sires change this next semester.
A -1 references as to ability, char-
acter, Fraternity or sorority pre-p
terred. Box 2. 259
LINEN HANKERCHIEFS, luncheon
fsets, bed spreads, pillow cases, hand
embroidered, some with University
Seal. Reduced price. Phone 2-2713
after 5:30. 248

i.

CLEVELAND'S
annual
t, et

-f C'/etet

First For Fun
for you

al .o
"Ncstradamus" - oddity
Special midmight show
TONIGHT at 11:30

FOR RESERVATIONS

Travel b
Blue Goose
Lines
Save your savings for other
things. Sample fares from
Ann'Arbor:

* SUPPER including Champagne
* Entire mezzanine Hotel Allerton
* Exclusive Collegiate Club Bar
* The original Case Rhythm Club
: Hilarious entertainment through-
out the evening with "ELMER from SIWAS "
SECTION RESERVED FroYOUR COLLEGE
INTER -COLLEGIATE COMMITTEE OF CLEVELANDI
HEADQIUAIRTERS - HOTEL A LERTON
W. R. PARSONS, Phone 9017

I =========

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Detroit
Kalamazoo
Grand Rapids
Port Huron
Saginaw
Lansing
Toledo
Sault- Ste.
Marie

$.95
2.15
3.05
2.70
2.25
1.55
1.35
9.20

$1.50
4.00
4.90
4.30
3.85
2.50
2.45
15.30

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