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December 04, 1938 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-12-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PRESS
PASSES
- By BUD BENJAMIN -
Only 100 Grand.. ..
UST ONE PARTING SHOT, and
J this column will turn the Hutch-
ins' dispute over to the hot stove
league. The following is an excerpt
from the annual report of the Mich-
gan Board in Control of Physical Ed-
ucation for the year 1936 to 1937.
"The result of our operations,
financially speaking, is practical-
ly determined by football income.
Occasionally it is suggested that
if football were eliminated from
the program and all the remain-
ing receipts including the student
physical education fee,. devoted
to carrying on the remaining ac-
tivities, all would be well. It is
obvious, however, that with such
elimination, increased income
from other sources amounting to
approximately $100,000 a 'year
would still have to be found. And
if all intercollegiate sports were
dropped, it would still be neces-
sary to supplement incomes ex-
elusive of such sports, by about
$50,000 a year."
Which simply means that 10-cent
admissions would run the school al-
most $100,000 into debt while com-
plete abolition of all sports would
still leave a $50,000 intramural sport
deficit.
BOB CONSIDINE of the I.N.S. has,
what is in my opinion, an excel-
lent suggestion for the elimination
of football ties. It was sent t him
by a Cincinnati football fan and goes
like this:
The point after touchdown rule
should be changed so that-
A place kick or drop /kick
counts one point.
A pass counts two points.
Rushing the extra point suc-
Cessfully nets three points.
This rule, claims Considine, would
give the game a new element of sus-
pense. Suppose, for example, that
a team is trailing 7 to 0 and in the
waning minutes scores a touchdown.
Instead of settling for a tie, this team
has the option of passing or running
for an 8 to 7 or 9 to 7 victory.
The innovation, he concludes, would
have two other associated effects:'
(1) it would be a tremendous boon
to the grandstand and coaches could
cuss the hapless quarterbacks to
death if they passed up a tie for an
unsuccessful two or three point con-
version; (2) it would find disapproval
among the football pool operators
who clean up each year on tie games.
MIKE RODNICK, the quiet little
gentleman with the flailing fists,
made quite a name for himself last
winter as a lightweight boxer in local
Golden Gloves circles. An aggres-
sive slugger, Rodnick, in his first year
of boxing, punched his way to a Gol-
den Gloves crown and was voted the
outstanding boxer of the tournament.
Since pugilism is frowned up-
on by Michigan moguls, Mike
turned to wrestling, also for the
first time, this fall. Apparently
he had more than a passing
knowledge of professional histri-
onics, for here's what happened.
Working out with teammate
Sawyer, Mike, sans the collegiate
technique, picked up his astound-
ed adversary, whirled him about
merrily in a gay airplane spin,
and crashed him to the mat with
aresounding smack.

Collegiate wrestling being a highly
technical endeavor, this flagrant vi-
olation of ethics provoked Coach
Cliff Keen exceedingly. Aggressive
Michael has been warned that such
unmitigated brass will not be tolerat-
ed in the future, and although the
little scrapper is still out there learn-
ing his fundamentals, it must be with
considerable surprise that he realizes
that two branches of the sport are
similar only in name.
PICKUPS : Funniest yarn of the
week by John Lardner in his
copywright column: It seems that
the Pasadena chamber of commerce
wrote to Notre Dame asking them for
leniency to Southern California and
the Rose Bowl gatp . . . By a mis-
take the telegram got twisted and
went to Notre Dame cathedral in
Paris ... The promptly sent a mes-
sage back: "Sorry, discontinued in-
tercollegiate football 725 years. ago."
... Ouch! .. . Jim Mace and Jo Co-
burn fought an hour and 17 minutes
in 1871 without striking a blow . .
Each had been told not to lead as the
other was a great counter puncher
.,. . The wise ones will tell you that
big Eddie Meade and his sepia slan-
mer Hurricane Henry Armstrong are
"berling" over the treatment accord-
ed them by Michael St. Gaudens Ja-
cobs of N'Yawk . . . Add contrasts:
125 candidates showed up the first
night of Minnesota hockey practice
And 100 freshmen are basketball
minded . .. . Nile Kinnick, Iowa foot-
bail, basketball and baseball star

Big

Ten

Officials

Rule Against

Post-Season

Games

Training Table
For Grid Men
Is Sanctioned
'B' Football Teams Given
Permission To Schedule
Friday Afternoon Tilts
CHICAGO, Dec. 3--P)-Western
Conference faculty representativses
iuickly tipped over the Rose Bowl
idea today-and then set one up "on
the house" in the form of a free eve-
ning meal for Big Ten football play-
ers.
With a decision to reaffirm their
standing of years against post season
contests, the faculty advisors turned
thumbs down on a plan which would
have made the Rose Bowl game an
annual contest between a Big Ten
team and one from the Pacific Coast
Conference.
Adopt Following Motion
The faculty representatives, point-
ing out that no formal proposal for
such a reciprocal arrangement ever
had been received from West Coast
authorities, adopted this motion:
"In view of the wide publicity given
to the matter of prolonging thlv foot-
ball season so as to permit the play-
ing of post season games, it was
moved and carried that the Confer-
ence reaffirm its ruling against such
extension of the playing season."
Little discussion, it was learned,
preceded adoption of the motion, and
the decision was practically unani-
mous. On the West Coast, official
silence greeted the Big Ten action.
Table Is Authorized
Authorization of the training table
plan was speedily achieved. Schools
will be permitted to- furnish the eve-
ning meal daily to players through-
out the gridiron season. Heretofore
players have been furnished meals
until the opening of classes. A
Conference "B" football teams
were voted permission to play Friday
games and the faculty members de-
cided that John Mariucci, crack Min-
nesota junior end, is eligible for an-
other year of Varsity competition.
Mariucci played Varsity ball one year
for Hibbing (Minn.) Junior College,
while a freshman at the institution.
It was decided that Junior College
Varsity competition, while the player
is a freshman at the college, does not
constitute a year of Varsity compe-
tition against the player should he
transfer schools.
Ball Games On Week-Ends
Track coaches decided to hold the
Central Collegiate Indoor Meet at'
Notre Dame March 10-11 and the out-
door meet June 2 at Marquette Uni-
versity, Milwaukee. Baseball coaches,
formulating their 1939 schedules, de-
cided to play games regularly on Fri-
days and Saturdays throughout the
season and that each team should
play every other Conference team
within a five year span.
Gophers Open Schedule
Impressively; Win 46-36
MINNEAPOLIS, Dec. 3.-(P)-The
Minnesota basketball team opened its
pre-conference schedule tonight by
winning about as it pleased from
South Dakota State, 46 to 36.
While only 10 points separated the
teams when the final gun sounded,
Coach Dave MacMillan had an en-
tire team of reserves in during the
last eight or ten minutes when the
Jackrabbits scored 14 points to only
three for the Gophers.
The Gophers led 23 to 8 at the half.
Pittsburgh Backs Chosen

HAMILTON, N.Y., Dec. 3.-(4P)-
Coach Andy Kerr of Colgate an-
nounced today that Marshall Gold-
berg and Harold Stebbins, Pittsburgh
backfield aces, have accepted invi-
tations to play with the All-East
team against the All-West eleven in
San Francisco on New Years Day.

Seven All-Americans

. . . Including Michigan's Ralph Heikkinen U.S.C. Upsets
d E IN otre Dane

Joe d einor
NOTRE DAME TACKLE

Two Quick Thrusts Win,
13-0, As South Benders'
Unbeaten Record Falls
LOS ANGELES, Dec. 3-(A')-Notre
Dame came tumbling off football's
highest peak today, knocked down
for the first time this year by South-
ern California, the Rose Bowl hopes
of the Far West, in a savage game
that ended in a 13 to 0 victory for
he Trojans before a record crowd of
101,000.
Beaten twice this year but deter-
mined to"carry no more defeats into
he Rose Bowl against Duke Jan. 2,
'.he warriors of Troy upset the NotreI
Dame hopes in two lightning-like
thrusts that spelled gloom for the
Irish.
Trojans Score Early
Coach Howard Jones' eleven stored
the first touchdown in the fading
moments of the first half after the
Irish had gambled for a first down
in midfield and lost, and hammered
the Notre Dame defense 35 yards after
,ecovering a fumble late in the fourth
period.
It was the thirteenth annual
struggle between these two inter-sec-
tional foes, and the courageous lads
from South Bend went into the game
on the crest of eight victorious games.
Minnesota, Northwestern, A r m y,
Navy, and all the others on one of the
toughest schedules in the land had
surrendered to the Irish forces, but
Troy refused to bend.
Record Crowd Attends
Packed in the Coliseum was the big-
gest Los Angeles crowd of the colorful
Notre Dame-U.S.C. series. It rivalled
the huge throng that saw the game in
Chicago in 1929.
Keyed up to a pitch of excitement,
both elevens missed scoring opportun-
ities in the first part of the battle.
Then came another opportunity for
the so-called Notre Dame opportun-
ists. But Bob Saggau, the splendid
Irish sophomore halfback star, who
tried to make three yards on fourth
down, missed by one yard on the
Irish 38.

1939 BASEBALL SCHEDULE:
April 21-22, Michigan at Ohio St.
May 5-6, Illinois at Michigan
May 12-13, Indiana at Michigan
May 18-19, Minnesota at Michigan
May 22-23, Michigan at Wisconsin
May 26-27, Michigan at Purdue
Track Team's
Trials Impress
Leutritz Takes Half-Mile;
Wisner Wins Mile Race
With Coach Charlie Hoyt in Chi-
cago at the Big Ten meeting, Ken
Doherty put the varsity track team
through its semi-final time trials of
the pre-Christmas practice yesterday.
The performance of the middle and
distance squads was impressive as
several of the new men turned in fine
times. Jack Leutritz, the big sopho-
more who has up to now been a quar-
termiler, coasted through a half-
mile in 1:58.7. Veteran Dye Hogan
was right behind.
Karl Wisner, who finished slightly
in the van, Ralph Schwartzkopf,
Harold Davidson and Ed Barrett put
on a blanket finish in the mile in
4:28. Barrett, a sophomore, finished
easily and may be the answer to a
dearth of two-milers in past years.
Quartermilers Warren Breidnbach
and Ross Faulkner, and sprinters Jim
Monahan and Bob Barnard also
turned in creditable performances.
Dame tackler, apparently Zontini,
clutching, his ankles. Phil Gaspar
missed the conversion and 35 seconds
later the half ended.
The Irish came out battling after
the rest, but so did the Trojans. They
were without their star quarterback,
Grenville Lansdell, who left the game
in the first quarter with a twisted
ankle, but Day, Mickey Anderson,
Jack Banta, Jimmy Jones and a few
other lesser lights were carrying on
the battle.
The second break for S. C. came
with about 10 minutes of the fourth
period left. Joe Piepul fumbled and
Jimmy Jones came up with the ball
for Troy on the Irish 35.
Ten plays--crash!--Troy's second
touchdown. Gaspar's conversion was
successful this time, and there was
the scor j, 13 to 0.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
At South Bend, Ind.: Notre Dame,
70; Ball State 30.
At Franklin, Ind.: Franklin 49;
Taylor University 36.
At Chicago: De Paul 55; Valparaiso
32.

Jerome Holland
CORNELL END

Marshall Goldberg
PITTSBURCH -BACK

John Pingel
MICHIGAN STATE BACK

THE 1938 A.P. ALL-AMERICA

First Team

Position

Second Team

Canadiens Wallop Leafs
To Climb Out Of Cellar1
TORONTO, Dec. 3.-(P)-The
Montreal Canadiens climbed out of

Jerome Holland, Cornell .......END........ Bowden Wyatt, Tennessee
Joseph Beinor, Notre Dame . . . TACKLE.. Insull Hale, Texas Christian
RALPH HEIKKINEN, Michigan GUARD......... Sidney Roth, Cornell
Charles Aldrich, Texas Christian<CENTER ........... Dan Hill, Jr., Duke

Edward Bock, Iowa State,... .
Alvord Wolff, Santa Clara .... .
Walter Young, Oklahoma ....
David O'Brien, Texas Christian
Linus Hall, Mississippi ........
John Pingel, Michigan State . .
Marshall Goldberg, Pittsburgh .

GUARD........ Francis Twedell, Minn.
TACKLE..... Torrance Russell, Auburn
END... ......Earl Brown, Notre Dame
BACK ....... George Cafego, Tennessge
BACK ...... William Patterson, Baylor
BACK....... Victor Bottari, California
BACK..... Sidney Luckman, Columbia

the National Hockey League cellar Day To Krueger
tonight when they drubbed the To- The Trojans took the ball and Ollie
Day, a reserve, trotted into the S.C.
ronto Maple Leafs 3 to 1 before a backfield. Two plays later, with the
crowd of 10,354. It was the fourth ball on the 37, Day sailed a pass into
straight game without a loss-three the arms of Al Krueger, hard-socking
wins and a tie-for the Montreal sophomore end. He took it on the six
club which lost its first seven games. and fell across the line with. a Notre

_ _ _ _

Oklahoma Downs
Washington State
NORMAN, Okla., Dec. 3-(A)-Ok-
lahoma's Sooners, gridiron championsj
of the Big Six, crushed Washington
State's Cougars, 28 to 0, here today
with a last-half surge that carried
them to the end of an all-victorious
season and ran their victory string
to 14 in a row.
By handing the Cougars their
worst beating of the season, the
Sooners wrote the final figures into
a season's record of 10 wins to carry
against undefeated Tennessee in the
Orange Bowl at Miami, Fla., Jan. 2.

I-M To Feature Handball
Exhibitions This Morning
In quest of stiff competition, out-
standing handball players from Cleve
land, Detroit and Grand Rapids con-
verge on Ann Arbor today.
The aggregation from Detroit
brings Lou Zerbo, former Detroit and
state champion, as well as Stilson
Ashe, last year's all-campus title
winner.
The matches are to be played at
the I-M courts this morning at 11:30
and are open to the public.
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