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December 02, 1938 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-12-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRID V, DLC. 19;8

-- ---- ----- --- - . .. . .. . .. .. .... ...... .. . ........ M....I....I....I.............. .. .. .. .. .. ... .

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Christmas T ime In Copenhagen Reveals'
Numerous Quaint Old Danish Customs

The Muffler-Dressiest Of Dress Det

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the children try in vain to peek
through the drawn curtains, they
light the candles then throw wide
the curtains and the children rush in
to see the glory of the decorated,
candle-bedecked tree and all join
hands to do a traditional circle dance
around the symbol of Christmas
gaiety, while the echoes of the caro-
lers' songs outside ring through the
quiet Christmas night.
So it is with this thought that we
regretfully say goodbye to beautiful
Denmark as the sun sinks below the
distant horizon and our ship slowly
puts out to sea . . .

Winter Cruise
Season Nears,
With Holidays
By ADRIENNE

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Flashy Muffler Can Dress Up
A Man's Last Year's Overcoat

For those fond parents who are
puzzled as to just what to give the
boys and girls, there are a number
of interesting trips a student might
take. The West Indies cruises which
last ten days are popular with young
people during vacation.
The days on shipboard are plea-
sant after the introductions have
been finished and the drunkards and
bores have shown their true colors.
The food on most liners has quality
and quantity.
On the French boats in particular,
the most prosaic and down-to-earth
Americans suddenly develop into
gourmands and attack their food
with all the subtlety of a connoisseur.
Havana, which does its best to imi-
tate Paris, has a certain charm, due
perhaps to its language which is
painfully, picturesquely foreign and
incoherent. Nassau, a British posses-
sion, is a. quiet, sleepy town with a
famed many-colored sea ranging
from blue to deep purple, optical
illusion, of course. The native police-
men speak in a clipped British ac-
cent and are most obliging and help-
ful.
For. sheer beauty, the island of
Jamaica isunforgettable, as the ship
comes into the harbor, the mountains
appear to rise out of the sea, stand-
ing in their luxuriant, exotic beauty.
The deep gorges cut through by swift
mountain streams remind one of the
mountain passes in Tennessee, if one
has been in Tennessee.
Panama has a strange lure, per-
baps because of the movies we have
seen, which show the Marines land-
ing in Panama. (How many Daily
readers have seen a living, breathing
Marine?) As for Mexico, it would be
satisfying enough to discover that
Mexicans could say something be-
sides, ,"Si senor," and "los gringos,"
with a leer.,;
For those who like vigorous out-
door life, there is the fast-growing
institution of youth hosteling. Sleep-
ing quarters may be obtained for 25
cents a night in the hostel with slight
charges for fuel and food. Silene
Valey Cooperative Farms is the
nearest hostel outside of Ann Arbor,
(if you can't afford Bermuda). There
are hostels throughout western
Michigan, Wisconsin and Illinois,
For Strained Relations,
Give Handkerchiefs
If your felations with grandma are
strained, if your brother-in-law does
not speak when you meet, if Aunt
Jenny belongs to the W.C.T.U.-then
GIVE HANDERCHEFS!
Besides being an ideal gift for
those with whom you aren't getting;
along, 'kerchiefs can be a dashing
supplement to any ensemble. Try
plum with a brown suit or, if you
are daring, yellow. It gives you that
ment.
Too, if worst comes to worst, you
can buy just plain hankerchiefs and
just be a plebian and blow your nose
with it.

By BILL NEWTON
(Of Honolulu)
Most people would welcome a win-
ter spent in Hawaii as a relief from
sleet, snow and slush witho,.t giving
a thought to the problem of trying
to become excited about Santa, his
ireindeer and the other characteris-
tics of an American Christmas Sea-
.,.,,n. If they considered the latter
angle, they would problably dismiss it
quickly: enthusiasm lost, sunshine
gained.
These sun-loving individuals, how-
ever, would be greatly surprised by
the Christmas Spirit one can attain
in a part of the world where Old
Man Winter has never showed his
face- Lack of home-grown holly and
pine trees won't benoticed. They will
be imported. Surf-riding will' ade-
quately replace skating parties, and
open roadsters will serve in place of
sleighs..
People have as many parties in
Hawaii during the Christmas Season
as they do in this part of the world,
and mistletoe is as effective under
a palm tree as it is in a steam-heated
living room. And Christmas shopping
is much easier when icy streets don't
make every step a hazard to life and
limb; everyone puts on his new linen
suit and dashes madly about making.
last-minute purchases, just as madly
as in Chicago or New York.
The absence of snow and ice doesn't
bother children in Hawaii. Santa gets
there. He abandons his reindeer and
sleigh, using instead a surf-board.
All-American Styles
Men's fashion firsts this fall and
winter are strikingly similar in one
respect to recent "All American" foot-
ball teams which have been replete
with names like Rzotkiewiecy, Froech-
tenicht and Kyriozopolos. Thus the
well dressed college boy will include
on his All American style list, Tyrol-
ean hats, Scotch plaid argyle socks,
Irish brogans and Cordovan shoes,
Shetland jackets, and Russian cord
shirts. Even the popular jockey
shorts are copied from Mahatma
Ghandi's outfit.

Warmly

Re e

i

ved.

He comes in with the morning tide,
wearing little besides a.pair of swim-
ming trunks. Again breaking tradi-
tion, Santa is alleged to be a healthy
Hawaiian brown, not the customary
pink and white.
Everyone becomes excited. Stock-
ings are husg by the backdoor-there
are few fireplaces. People read "The
Night Before Christmas," and the
children lie awake most of the night
in i anticipation of the morning's
pleasure.
Really, you should try it sometime.
You can have the fun of warm weath-
er and still get the cold weather
Christmas Spirit. And carols sound
much better sung to the accompani-
ment of guitars and ukuleles than to
frozen-valved horns.
II. .it

"Button up your overcoat when
the wind is free," say the lyrics of
an old favorite tune. But college stu-
dents with any degree of stylistic
sensibility will strongly protest
against having to walk around cam-
pus with collar turned up like a crim-
inal hiding from court photographers.
Enter the muffler.
A smart looking muffler, like a
neat shirt and tie, can work miracles
in turning last year's overcoat into a
smart outfit. From the gift problem
angle, the scarf is always a safe in-
vestment. Breathes there a student
with a soul so dead that he wouldn't
cherish two or three or more mufflers
or gloves? So if you are in doubt as.
to what to give Dad or brother, or
the boy friend give a scarf and glove
set.
Two years ago mufflers of every
color combination conceivable were
the rage for campus, city or country.
But don't let the vivid impression they
made lead you to believe they are still
the thing when you select this year's
gift. The violent, artificial plaids have
been replaced by more sober, genuine-
Scotch plaids, but for afternoon and
sport wear only. The Beau Brummel
no longer calls on his damsel of a
Saturday eve with his muffler light-
ing the way.
In scarfs ahd gloves, as well as in
all woolen clothing, richness pre-
dominates. But richness of quality
rather than hue. 'Thick, epensive-
looking woolens are proving the cam-
pus favorite this season. The univer-
sal yellow scarf and glove set is
still very strong, but has passed its
zenith of popularity, while maroon
and blue sets, so strong last year, are
not being worn at all by the style
conscious this season. Their disap-
pearance is accompanied by home-
made sets. Mother, sister and girl
friend find their painful efforts 4a
knitting scarfs deprecated by the ex,
tremely low priced manufactured pro-
ducts, that are fully as rich looking.
King's Tailor Lauds
Sovereign's Dress
Harry Benson, tailor to His Majes-
ty George VI of Great Britain, has
a few opinions on current trends in
men's fashions. Stripes are here to
stay, for one thing, and the three
button jacket is coming back" for
another.
His Majesty's own tastes, Mr. Ben-
son declares, are impeccable. "Of
course," he says, "His Majesty is con-
servative in his dress, but let it not
be sai dthat he is old fashioned. Well
turned-out Englishmen never are.
Moreover, such men care little about
style as such. They want to be prop-
erly dressed rather than 'well-
dressed'."
The Anthony Homburg is still
sported widely in the London West
End. As one Mayfair hatter has said,
"That hat has become too firmly
established to be blown off by a poli-
tical breeze-not the way we make
them!"

This year, pigskin gloves, an old
and- reliable favorite, are returning
strongly, with the decline of scarf
and glove sets. They are priced at a
rather high level, compared to the
string and wolen knitted gloves.
But they afford the smartest and
most practical hand wear this year.
Capeskin and artificial kid gloves are
being offered by merchants as substi-
tutes for the more expensive pigskin,
but they are not being as popularly
received.
Fur-lined capeskin, however, makes
fine afternoon and sport wear and
provides a great deal of warmth. For
formal wear white silk or knitted
n.Ufflers, and knitted string gloves,
lined with a cottonish wool, are reign-
ing supreme but are not very moder-
ately priced. The blase huge mittens,
and furry gloves that were a minor
fac last year are no more strongly m
style this season. Like maize and blue
earmuffs they are more novel than
stylish.

A gift of a RABHOR robe
will be warmly received
by any man on Christ'
mas morning.

ails Santa Appears On Surf Board
For Hawaiian Christnms Time

THE CHRISTMAS STORE I
of MEN'S GIFTS
If you haven't decided what to give "Him," we believe
our store will furnish the inspiration. We have a
splendid variety of men's gifts. A pleasure to show
you and help you-
* NECKWEAR * JEWELRY
* SHIRTS * GLOVES
* ROBES, Silk and Wool ! MUFFLERS, Silk or Wool
! SMOKING JACKETS * RAINCOATS 1
* HOSIERY !SUITSA
% * TOCOATS
! HANDKERCHIEFS * O'COATS
* LEATHER NOVELTIES ! MACKINAWS
! PAJAMAS ! SUEDE JACKETS
* FITTED CASES 6 CORDUROY REEFERS
*4
It's Christmas Time in
Staeb & Day's STORE for MEN
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET

RABHOR robes come in
blue, brown, maroon
wool. Priced $6.95
COnlin-
Wetherbee.
118 East Washington St.
DOWNTOWN

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WA R
A Gift for Loungers
Say MERRY CHRISTMAS. . . with
a smart BLANKET ROBE, a gift that
is practical. One to be cherished all
year. Many patterns and colors
-4.95
1 For Him ..*.
Select a tie he will wear. One that
bespeaks a touch of individuality.
1':. 1One that will nell O-U-A-J -I-T-Y.

SHOP EARLY for best selec-
tions. Look up sizes on Shirts,
Hosiery and Gloves. Buy now
on our lay-away plan.

Neckwear

Silk and Wool Scarfs
Lined and Unlined Gloves
Mittens

Ritz Shirts
Flannel Robes
Silk Robes.
Cocktail Coats
House Coats
Wool Jackets
Suede Jackets
Bush Coats

Togues
Belts and Buckles
Suspenders
Swank Jewelry

Interwoven Hosiery
Sweaters
Twin-Sweaters
Underwear
Shirts and Shorts
Pajamas
Flannel Pajamas
Flannel Night Shirts

I

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