100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 20, 1938 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

20, 1938

Z'HE r .ICHI:GAN - I)AIL .

PAGETHIRY-,U

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THIRTY-Fl

$10,000 In Hopwood Prizes
Spurs Campus Literary talent
Prizes totaling as much as $10,000 one course in composition in the de-
are given each spring to students of partment of English or the depart-
the University as awards in the Jule I ment of journalism for at least one
and Avery Hopwood contests for crea- semester.
tive writing. Prizes are listed in each Established by the will of the late
of the four fields of writing, essay, Avery Hopwood, '05, a writer of light
poetry, fiction and drama. comedy dramas for the stage, the en-
Awards are divided into three dowment fund provides the awards
groups: the major awards, of which for the purpose of fostering student
there is one of $2,000 in each field, creative writing and encouraging in
particular "the new and the radical."
8 Contests Since 1931
Avery Hopwood Eight contests have been held since
their inauguration in 1931. Judges
for the contests are selected from
among the nation's leading writers in
the specified fields. Among the judges
in the eight years have been Agnes
Repplier, Louis Untermeyer, Stephen
Vincent Benet, Franklin P. Adams,
<Max Eastman, Henry Seidel Canby,
Dorothy Canfield Fisher, John Er-
skine, Sinclair Lewis, H. L. Menken,
Mark Van Doren and Dorothy
' Thompson.
During this eight years, the Hop-
wood contest has become known
throughout the country and it is ex-
pected that it will become one of the
major sources for recognizing and
encouraging amateur talent in crea-
" tive writing.f
Five Works Published!
To date, five of the major fiction
prize winners have been published.
Prizes totaling $10,000 are a- Mildred Walker's "Fireweed," winner
warded each spring in the Hop- in the 1933 contest, was the first, fol-
wood contests for creative writing. lowed by Hubert Skidmore's "I Will
These contests were established by Lift Up Mine Eyes," winner in the
Avery Hopwood, writer of light 1935 contest and a contender for the
comedy dramas. Pulitzer Prize last year. Ruth L.
Dobson's "Straw in the Wind," win-
ner of the chief major award in 1936
open to seniors and graduate stu- was the third to be published. Bax-
dents; the minor award of $250 in ter Hathaway's "The Stubborn Way,"
each field, open to undergraduates; also a winner in 1936 and Emmanuel
and the freshman awards with three Menatsagenian's "The Well of Ara-u
prizes of $50, $30 and $20 in each of rat," major winner in, 1937.a
the fields. However, changes in A portion of the endowment moneya
amounts may be made at the discre- is set aside each year to bring tov
tion of the judges. Ann Arbor an outstanding speaker to
Eligibility Rules deliver the Hopwood Lecture which
Rules for eligibility demand that is given at the meeting at which the
the entrant carry at least 12 hours o~f awards are given. Speakers for thes
regular University work with no grade -last two years have been Christophera
below "C" and be enrolled in at leastMorley and Walter Prichard Eaton.
4 ,

The Union Undergraduate Council For 1938-39

t
t
1
c
t
k
j

Peace Committee Frank P. Price Will Be
Meets This Week Guest Carillonneur Here
Frank Percival Price, Dominion
The United Peace Committee, Cairillonneur in the Peace Tower of
which to date includes 25 organiza- the Parliament Building in Ottawa,
tions interested in furthering the till be guest carillonneur here for.a
cause of peace, will nave its first I i beeeks statingrhrfor-
meeting this week, according to Mar-
tin B. Dworkis, '40, president. :ow.
The Committee is planning a series Mr. Price will present a program at
of educational programs for the year 4:15 p.m. each Sunday and at 7 p.m.
to include lectures, movies and stu- each Wednesday. Shorter recitals
dent symposiums. There will also will be given at noon on other days.
be several social events to raise fundsHehsgvncrlo.eitstruh
for carrying on the work of the or- He has given carillon recitals through
ganization. out Europe and North America.

o _

II

R

-- --,i

++ o o
*IM8 u

WELCOME

#

Above are photographs of the members of the Union Undergraduate Council, who tok office last May.
Reading from left to right, top row: Ted Spangler, publicity; Harry L. Sonneborn, Daily correspondent; Doug-
las Tracy, cooperatives; Harry Howell, orientation. Middle row: John Knecht, social; Donald Belden, recording
secretary; Paul Brickley, president; Don Treadwell, orientation. Bottom row: James Wills, house; James Halli-(
gan, social; Hadley Smith, house; Don Nixon, publicity; and Clifford Livingston, cooperatives.
~-~ _1

More Than One Million Books
Found In University Library

Progressive lub
Hub Of PLberaiCsm

The Ann Arbor Savings and Commercial Bank wishes to
welcome those returning from their vacations to Ann Arbor,
and also those who are new in the city.
We hope it will be our pleasure to handle your banking
business in as satisfactory a manner as we have in the past.
Patronize our campus branch-conveniently located on State
at Nickels Arcade.
A n rbo r Savings.
& C omme rcial Bank.

11

Entire Unit Is
Into Several
AccordingTo

Divided
Branches'
Subjects

'V

VELCOME STUDENTS
THE GERMAN INN
117 West Huron 1
Noted for Good Food,
Beer and Wines
"Just Like Mother Used To Make!"

n
c
r
a
n
0
v
a
f:
1
4
2i
C
it
Il
t.

More than a million valuable vol-
umes, representative of every period
and phase of the history of mankind,
are located on the shelves of the
various units of the TUi'versity of
Michigan Library.
The Library proper is composed of
several smaller branches, all of them
available to students and located on
the University campus. The General
Library, standing in the middle of the
campus diagonal, is the largest, con-
taining 607,615 volumes, and 14,389
maps. It contains a number of special
collections, many of which have been
received as gifts during recent years.
Some of the most valuable of these
are -the Parsons Library of Political
Science, the Goethe Library, the Mc-
Millian Shakespeare Library and a
number of other groups of smaller size.
The large library building was
opened in 1920. It has seats in its
various reading and study rooms for
about 1,000 persons. The General
Library is open daily, during the aca-:
demic year, from 7:45 a. m. to 10
R. m., except Sunday, when it is open
from 2 p. m. to 9 p. m.
The William L. Clements Library
of American History, completed in
1923, houses an invaluable collection
of books, manuscripts and maps. The
ibrary was the gift of William L.
Clements, '82, and relates to the dis-
overy of the western continent and
its settlement and later history. The
collection is said to be especially rich
n rare books and pamphlets deal-
ng with early colonial history and
he period of the American Revolu-
ion. It is located on South University
Ave.

The Mich.iaan.pr . bs.v Club, an
the Forestry Library, The Law Li- organization to unify and to put into
brary, the Medical Libraries, the action liberal thought on campus, will
Museum Library, the Natural Science .concentrate its efforts this year on
Library, the Physics Library, and the .rectifying recurring campus prob-
Transportation Library. lems such as housing.
The various libraries receive period- The Club, which affiliated last.
icals regularly numbering 4,418. The year with the American Student.
income of the Ford-Messer bequest of Union, a national organization, made
$20,000, of the Coyl Bequest of $10,000, tentative plans for the year at an
of the Octavia William Bates Bequest executive board meeting Saturday.
of over $17,000, and of the Silas -
Wright Dunning Bequest of $83,000 -
is used to add ooks to the General
Library.
The University Library is one of
the depositories for the printed cata-
log cards issued by the Library of
Congress. It also subscribes to the
card publications of the John Crerar
Library of Chicago, the American
Library Association, Harvard Uni-
versity, the University of Chicago,
the Prussian State Library, Berlin,
and various others. The bulk of the

I

University's book possessions are now
recorded in a public catalog.
One of the most beautiful legal
reference libraries in the world is the
University Law Library, located in
the heart of the Law Quadrangle. It
contains 130,409 volumes and 699
periodicals.
- - - -

Southeast Corner
of Main and Huron

NICKELS ARCADE
at State Street

J'

-
Start off in the best equipped manner with a
dependable new pen from FOL L ETT'S. Only
at FO L L ETT'S can you make your selection
from this large choice of colors, styles, and
points of these nationally advertised brands.
Your name engraved FREE on pens selling for

i

-'I

I

I

I

i

Ii. .iI

s

4"

For Freshman
Enlightenment
There is a good store in town
for the satisfaction of your
HARDWARE NEEDS. Come
down to SCHLENKER'S when
you desire good HARD-
WEAR, PAINTS, RADIOS,
etc. We have just what you
want.
SCHiLEN KER
HARDWARE CO.
213 West Liberty 2-3265

Visible
Skrip
SuppIy
Gold
Point

$3.50 or more.

_

SHEAFFER'S

a

. s

$3.50 $5.00 $ g5 $1.00

BUY HERE
AND SAVE!

Flash!

o
0 0
"'' s ;%;
-t+'' s
r" irk : ((''''
SI;i r
.,.+ i
; j.
A . Q Q"
E E{Ei i O

Other branches of the University of
Michigan Library are the Architecture
Library, the Chemistry and Phazr-
acy Library, The School of Dentistry
Library, ihe Economics-Mathematics
Library, the Engineering Libraries,

I,

t

PARKER'S

WASP PENS made by Sheaffer ... $1.00 with inter-
changeable point - complete new assembly -only 25c

$j.25 ].75

Z.75

3.50 5.00 7.50 8- 10.00

ALL STY.E 1939
MANTEL RADIOS

$8.95 up

PENS that won't let you down by running dry unexpect-
edly in classes or exams - Ful 'Tlevision Ink Supply
EVERSHARP REPEATING PENCILS . . $1.50 #
SCRIPTO PENCILS . . .lc --50c

Five-tabe Full-Flating Dynamic
Speaker A Super Special Bargain
$8.95
ix-tube Automatic Tuning TRUETONE
$14.95

FOLLETT'S
MICHIGAN BOOK STORE

ASSOCIATED STORE

WESTERN AUTO
208 East Huron

I

TIRE CO.
4th Avenue at Huron
Phone 4700 S.D. (Casey) Jones, Mgr.

SUPERHETERODYNE
ONLY 95

I

I

State Street at North U .,

I

U1

h' a
, . r

I

0

; y
a. '

f!

f

f

Scotty

Y "

=
F

* Scotty
* will

Remember

I

U

i

I - ,u~.i

I

U "' P El

I

Li

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan