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September 20, 1938 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 20, 1938

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

3ophers Rank As Slight Favorites In

Wide Open Grid Race

dig Problem Coaches Busy
SVew Mound Staff Predicting Title
missed last season because. of illness, For Opponents
and although he may not be suffi-
ciently recovered to assume the catch- Indiana And Northwestern
ing burden, his lusty clouting may be Are Given Title Chance
utilized in the outfield. The latterh' S
two, a pair of Fritz Crisler's likely Along With Ohio State
sophomore gridders, are less experi-
enced, but show promise, at the plate With all indications pointing to-
as well as behind it. ward a wide-open race for the Big
Gedeon Plays First Ten gridiron crown the coaches of
The first base duties will be handled the contending tems have spent
by Elmer Gedeon. The lanky grid
and track star hit close to .300 last their spare time thinking up bear
season, led the squad in extra base stories and verbally handing the title
knocks, and according to Fisher to somebody else.
showed more improvement at the "A championship team is out,"
plate than any member of the team moans Bernie Bierman of Minne-
during the course of the year. sota; "Watch Indiana," warns Fran-
With Captain Walt Peckinpaugh, cis Schmidt of Ohio State; "Ohio
son of the former major leaguer, looks good to me," says the Wildcats
Roger, and Pete Lisagor, both .300 Lynn Waldorf.1
hitters, returning to their posts -at Gophers Favored
third and second respectively, short- Not to bze daunted by the Coaches'
stop presents the only infield prob- gloomy stories however, the gridiron
lem. Earl Smith, a capable reserve is fans of the mid-west still rate Minne-
back, but faces stiff competition sota's Gophers as slight favorites to
fromp a sophomore trio, Mike Sofiak, _____ ___
Bill Steffon, and Art Bergeson.
Four Outfield Veterans
Smick, Charley Pink, Fred Trosko,.
and Harold Floersch are the outfield:.'' ---;,
veterans returning, with the first two
cinch starters. Smick hit .345 last '
season, and led his team-mates in
virtually every offensive department.
He'll play right field, when not pitch-
ing. Pink, diminutive center gardener,b
proved himself during his sophomore
year, a dependable if not too robusts
hitter. Called by Fisher the best lead
off man Michigan has produced iIn
the past 19 years, Charley combines
speed with a rare bunting ability and t
a great eye.{
Bill Cartmill, Gilbert Sauer, and a
Bill Luther, sophomores, and Horace Lynn Waldorf
Tinker, a junior, ineligible last sea- Ln Waldor
son, will contest the two remaining h ocs__
veterans for the vacated left field-
berth, with Williams a possible can- win. It's safe to stick with the cham-
didate. pion they say, especially the kind of
a champion that the Gophers have
been for the past six years.
_=_- With 20 lettermen returning paced
by Harold Van Every, last year's
sparkplug, Bierman figures his team
to be stronger in the center of the
line and at fullback and weaker at
the halves and quarterback with the
ends also uncertain. This much is
tunes * * * certain, however. With an even
stronger middle of the line to open
holes for such bone-crushing full-
backs as veteran line-smashers Larry
Buhler and Win Christianson, the
team to win the crown must lick
these Swedes from the north country
first. A prediction-Minnesota's fifth
team will be weaker.
Schmidt Wails
Down at Columbus they are be-
wailing the loss of such performers
as center Ralph Wolf, backs Jim Mc-
Donald, Nick Wasylik, Dick Nardi
/ and others but the news isn't all bad.
By way of balancing the loss, 15 let-
termen are back reenforced by a lot
of new talent including quarteback
I Don Scott whose triple-threat abili-
, ties have been widely publicized.
Johnny Rabb, driving fullback whose
eligibility was reenstated last spring,
is once again back in the picture.
Francis Schmidt won't talk but
the folks down Columbus way will
ze your and they are making no bones about
picking the Buckeyes as one of the
nation's best.
N And listen. That low murmer you
N UOyear in the background is Indiana
title talk. Nobody will come right
out and say it but things are looking
up in Bloomington. Bo McMillan's
only worry concerns the loss of five
- _ -- _______ of last year's regular linemen but
n -again sophomores are being counted
Ion to fill the gaps. Capt. Bob Haak,

Composite Big Ten Football Schedule

Team-

Michigan Illinois

Indiana Iowa

Chicago

Minnesota Nor'western

Ohio Purdue

Wisconsin

Sep. 23, nite Washington Detroit

Sept. 24

(no game)

Ohio U.
at
Champaign

(no game)

Sep. 23, nice
U.C.L.A.
Los Angeles
(no game)

(no game)

Washi ngton
at
Minneapolis

(no game) (no game)

Detroit
at (no game)
Lafayette

Butler Marquette

Oct. 1

Mich. State De Paul Ohio
at at at
Ann Arbor. Champaign Columbus

at at ato
Chicago Mi nne polis Evanston

at
Indian, Ind

Bradley Nebraska Kans. State Columbus

But ler Marquette
at at
dia napolis Madion

S. Calif. Minnesota Iowa

Oct. 8

Chicago Indiana Illinois Wisconsin Michigan Purdue Drake
at at at at at at at
Ann Arbor Champaign Champaign Iowa City Ann Arbor Minneapolis Evanston
Minnesota Notre Dame Nebraska Chicago Iowa Michigan Ohio

S. Calif. Minnesota
at at
Columbus Minneapolis

Iowa
at
Iowa City

No r'wes tern Fordham Pittsburgh

Oct. 15

at at at

at

at

at

at

No r'wes to rn Fordham
at at
Evanston New York

Pittsburgh
at
Madison

Mii ne apolis South Bend Lincoln Chicago
Yale No r'wes tern Bloomington Colgate
Oct. 22 at at at at
New'Haven Champaign Kans. State Iowa City

Chicago Minneapolis Evanston

Illinois Chicago Wisconsin Purdue

Ohio
at
Columbus

(no game)

Illinois
at
Champaign

Chicago
at
Columbus

Wisconsin
at
Lafayette

Purdue
at
Lafayette

New York U. Iowa Indiana

Wisconsin Purdue' De Pauw

Oct. 29

Illinois Michigan
at at
Ann Arbor Ann Arbor

Wisconsin
at
Madison

at
Iowa City

De Pau :V
at
Chicago

No r'wes tern Minnesota
at at
Evanston Evanston

New York U.
at
New York

Iowa
aty
Iowa City

Indliana
at
Madison

Harvard Iowa Wisconsin Purdue Ohio Nor'western

Penn.
Nov. 5 at (no game)
Ann Arbor
No r'wes tern Ohio
Nov. 12 at at
Ann Arbor Champaign
Ohio State. Chicago
Nov. 19 at atg
Columbus Chsicg

Boston Coll. Minnesota
at at
Boston Minneapolis.

Harvard
at
Cambridge

Iowa Wisconsin
at at
Minneapolis EvanstonT
Notre Dane Michigan
at at
South Bend Ann Arbor

Purdue
at
Columbus
Illinois
at
Champaign

Ohio
at
Columbus
(no game)

Nar'wes torn
at
Evanston
U.C.L.A.
at
Los Angeles

Iowa Indiana
at at
Bloomington Bloomington

College of
Pacific at
Chicago

Nebraska Illinois Wisconsin Notre Dame Michigap Indiana Minnesota

Purdue
Lafayette

Nebraka
at
Iowa City

Illinois
at
Chicago

Wisconsin Notre D3ame Michigap
at at at
Madison Evanston Columbus

Indiana
at
Lafayette

atin sca
Madison

the Hoosiers husky tackle, will again in fullback Howie Weiss who proved
be the bulwark of the line. hismerit last season.
kWhile we're talking of dark horses
Lynn Waldorf's NorthwesternjIllinois may as well ie included. Bob
squad will make its bid as the fourth Zuppke's boys are used to that cog-
contender. The Wildcat's Negro nomen and usually live up to it.
flash, Bernie Jefferson, leads 20 re- "We will have to depend in the
turning lettermen and the Evanston main on our experienced players
eleven will pack power aplenty. from last year," says Zup. "If our
Ranking with Michigan as a dark sophomores develop as we hope, espe-
horse in the title race, is Harry cially in the backfield, Illinois should
Stuhldreher's Wisconsin team which be better."
was tough to beat in 1937. The Purdue will present a squad that
Badgers are well fortified everywhere will probably be lthe youngest in the
and boast of a potential All-American Big Ten

Don went through the dual meet sea-.

Four Are Missing
From Mat Champs
(Continued from Page 9)
as, with Jack Sawyer, red-headed
sophomore in reserve.
Elsewhere there is no cause for
worry. Captain Harold Nichols re-
turns to his usual spot at 145 pounds,
and his kid brother, Don, will be
back seeking to repeat his Confer-
ence victory at 175 pounds. Husky

Don went through the dull meet sea-
son undefeated last winter, and prom-
ises to be even better this year.
Forest Jordan, burly football guard,
ranks as the No. 1 heavyweight at
present. 'Butch' has been unable to
show his true worth as yet, being
handicapped by injuries during his
sophomore year, and foregoing com-
petition last season, but Coach Keen
is decidedly optimistic about his
chances. Just in case Jordan falters,
lettermen Joe Savilla and. Tim Hird,
will be around to help out.

A FOOTBALL EXPERT

TELLS YOU IN THIS WEK'S POST

A

A

V

Li

HO'LL WIN, the big games this Fail?
What men from here will be in'the head-
lines? A football expert makes, some prophecies,
and gives you a team-by-team appraisal of your
competition. Tells how the new rules affect the
game, whether 1938 football will be conserva-
tive or razzle-dazzle, and what the colleges
think about the new legal athletic scholarship
introduced in the Southeastern conference.
Here's some lively dope about teams, trends and
players; read it in the Post this week.
Pigskin Preview of 1938
by FRANCIS WALLACE

IN THE SAME ISSUE

DOES THE PUBLIC THINK COLLEGE A
WASTE OF TIME? Last winter the Post invited
D RobertMaynard Hutchins, President of the University of
Chicago, to write a series of articles on education. He received 900
letters from readers. Now, in Hutchins Answers Hutchins, he
gives you a peek at his mail, and shows you what people told him
about education.
MR. GLENCANNON-THE YOGI OF WEST NINTH STREET. For
years, in barrooms throughout the world, Mr. Glencannon had studied the
breath-control problem. Read what happens when he finds a book called "The
Secrets of Hindu Yoga Breath Control," and, aided by a quart or two, tries it out.
A swell new story by Guy Gilpatric, wherein Mr. Glencannon steals a letter box.

''
sa .2f 1a° a y '
.. '",sa
i
s r f
{
t i ill i i Q

A WOMAN SPY IN BERLIN CAN'T TRUST ANYBODY! Not even
her employers. Perhaps not even herself. The Gestapo ordered Anna Kleerman
to trap a "harmless, rather stupid" young Englishman. The records in File
No. 36475 tell you what happened. A dramatic story by William C. White.

U

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