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October 04, 1938 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-10-04

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ICHIGAN fDAILY

Uichigan's First Big Ten Titlists To Return Saturday

'RESS

Janke Returns
As Team Drills

Gophers Display Usual Power
As Indiana Troubles Ohio State

PASSES
-By BUD BENJAMIN-

Learning . .

ICHIGAN'S football team is still
in the embryonic stage, and
trange as that may sound, it's an
neouraging observation on the po-
entialities of the outfit.
You've got to look at this 1938 team
with some sort of perspective to ade-
luately appraise its worth. The whole
iackground has been one of transi-
ion and change. That is why today
ou can accurately, compare this
Michigan team to a snowball rolling
town hill, gaining momentum and
>roportion every inch of the way.
iow big will it grow? How fast will
t travel?
When Coach Fritz Crisler is-
sued his spring call this year he
had a genuine problem at hand.
There were sophomores to teach,
and that often means starting
from scratch. There were veter-
ans to school, veterans whose di-
verse background practically rele-
gated them to the same scratch
position. Linemen who had start-
ed by following the dictums of
Cappy Cappon only to be whipped
into the groove that Hunk Ander-
son demanded the following year.
The situation 'applied to the team
s a whole. With Crisler came new
heory, new technique, new methods.
['he general type of football remained
he same, but the specific detail was
astly deviated.
Thus, even today, the learning pro-
tess continues. As Crisler himself
ut it once:
"We can't waste a minute this
year. Every second is precious."
He hasn't wasted many seconds
hus far. And that is why this Mich-
gan team is so unpredictably dan-
etous this year. It is not a static
ituation with a veteran team having
absorbed practically all the coach has
o offer. Here is a group which pe-
uliarly combines sophomore and
enor with both imbibing know-
edge.
For that very reason it will be in-
eresting to watch the progress of
his Michigan team. They are today
very plastic and pliable bunch, and
s Crisler moulds theh into his in-
pired pattern they continue to ab-
sob. That they have ample to learn
s admitted. But everyone who saw
heir splendid performance against
State can't fail to realize that they
e far beyond ,the scratch of last
p.lng and : ontinually moving In th'e
igh' direction. Their pace may sur-
prise even the most optimistic.
S PROMISED here's the Tuesday
confession on Saturday's sins. Re-
,heckng the consensus of my junior
olleagues, I find that they batted
axactly .706 on their Saturday grid
elections. Out of 34 games, they
>icked 24 winners.- -
Four ties-Auburn and Tulane,
Boston U. and Lehigh, Chicago
and Bradley Tech, and Wash-
ington, Idaho-hurt the prognos-
ticators no end. The defeats were
Brown's upset of Harvard, Co-
lumbia's dump of Yale, Oregon
whipping U.C.L.A., Oklahoma t1p-
ping Rice, Santa Clara spilling
Stanford, and Penn S t a t e
trouncing Maryland, 33 to 0. Any-
way I had that last one figured,
thanks 4to P.S. alum, Uncle Bill.
MAbe the boys will listen to me
hereafter.
Junior Tom Phares led the pack
with only seven misses for .794. Con-
cldering the four ties, that isn't bad

Captain Exercises Injury ; Avenging last year's surprise defeat told the tale. The work of two Buck-
by Nebraska, Minnesota's powerful eye sophomore backs, Don Scott and
Gedeon Also On Hand Gophers crushed the Cornhuskers 16- Jim Sexton, was outstanding.
It was in a spirit of gaiety and 7 Saturday, and established them- The hapless Chicago Maroons, next
opponents for Fritz Crisler's crew
semi-frivolity that Michigan's victor- selves once more as the team to beat r ent forerit Cie cre
were held to a scoreless tie by little
ious gridders romped through a light- in the coming Big Ten race. Bradley Tech. The boys from the
work-out yesterday afternoon at Ferry Coach Bernie Bierman was forced midway showed glaring line weak-
Field. And added to the display of to use a remade backfield last week nesses, but Coach Clark Shaughnessy
pep came the heartening appearance due to the absence of the injured has a quartet of classy backs led by
of Capt. Fred Janke-in uniform. !Harold Van Every, but the junior the hard-going Solly Sherman, who
Janke, who was carried off the field triple threat star will be back in may be troublesome to future oppon-
in the final quarter of the 14-0 win plenty of time for the Michigan game, ents.
over State Saturday, suffered a torn Oct. 15. Northwestern and Illinois were both
lateral ligament in his leg but exam- Ohio State, perennially ranked with very impressive in their one-sided vic-
ination proved the injury a minor one/ the Gophers as the class of the Con- tories over independent foes. The
The big senior tackle did not go ference heap, was not quite so impres- Wildcats uncovered a successor to the
through any workout but simply jog- sive in edging out a fighting Indiana great Don Heap in Jack Ryan, a
ged around the field with little more team, 6-0. The mammoth Buckeye junior, as they bowled over Kansas
than a slight limp and added his line was outcharged throughout by the State, 21-0. Illinois proved that the
voice to a general enthusiasm which lighter Hoosier forwards, but Ohio's Ohio U.,loss was a mistake as they
has been almost unknown in these superior backfield strength finally trounced DePaul, 44-7.
parts since 1933. ~-
Janke probably won't see action
against Chicago this Saturday but
will be ready, willing and able when
the Wolverines invade Minneapolis a t !
week frem Saturday.
Coach Fritz Crisier sent two teams
through a signal drill while a com- CARL F. BAY
bination of a second and third team
scrimmaged against the hapless "meat
grinders". Crisler intends no let-up High Grade
against the heavier Chicago team. College and Watch and Jewelry
More fundamentals and pass defense Fraternity JewelryRepairing-- Engraving
will be stressed this week although
I Michigan interceptions. of Spartan

I

Michigan's Big Ten Champions in 1898. First row: left to right, McDonald, Weeks, White, and France. Second
row: Street, Barabee, Caley, Capt. Bennett, Steckle, Widman, and Tallcott. Third row: Potter, Mgr. Baker,
McLean, Snow, Avery, Cunningham, and Coach Ferbert.
*I * * *" *~ * * * *

v_

By PHIL PACK
An even 40 years ago, two thingsj
happened to start the University of!
Michigan football teams on their long
victory trail and to earn them the
sobriquet of "champions of the west."
The first was Michigan's initial Big
Ten football championship, won by
a team that piled up a record of 10
wins and no losses and 205 points
against 26 for all opponents combined.
The second thing to happen, and
probably the more significant in Wol-
verine football history, was the birth
Chicago Fans
Receive Cubs
Riotous Welcome Is Given
To 'Team By 300,000
CHICAGO, Oct. 3-(AP)-A roaring
reception by thousands of cheering
Chicagoans keyed Manager Gabby
Hartnett and his Cubs today for
their World Series warfare against
the New York Yankees opening Wed-
nesday.
Fresh from their amazing drive to
National League championship, the
team rode through the downtown dis-
trict in a triumphant half-mile long
parade.
Some 300,000 citizens declared an
impromptu holiday and turned out to
greet the idols of the hour as they
were borne through blizzards of con-
fetti in open cars. Hartnett was, of
course, the No. 1 hero to the cheering
throng. A broad -smile spread over his
tomato red face as he waved both
hands to the people who shouted from
the sidewalks and windows of sky-
scrapers in crowded La Salle Street-
at the City Hall entrance, scene of the
official reception.
The Yankees come to town tomor-
row in their usual role of odds-on
favorites to clout the Cubs into sub-
mission in five games or less. Both
teams will work out at Wrigley Field,
the Cubs in the morning and the
Yanks in the afternoon.
FROSH SWIMMERS
There will be a very important
meeting for all freshman swim-
ming candidates today at 5 p.m.
at the Intramural Pool. Atten-
dance is imperative. 4
Matt Mann.
speculation, Thomas. Herb Lev was
second with eight misses for .765.
We'll be haunting you again this
week-end.

of "The Victors." famed Michigan
fighting song and the march of every
Michigan regiment since the Spanish
War.
To Honor Elbel
In honor of that first champion-
ship team and Louis Elbel, author of
"The Victors," Michigan will set aside
next Saturday (Oct. 8) as "1898 Day."
The men who won the first title, most
of whom now have white hair and
who average nearly 70 years of age,
will sit in a midfield box, decked with
the Wolverine colors and, appropri-
ately enough, watch Michigan battle
with Chicago, the same team they de-
feated by a 12-11 score so many years
ago for the title.
Their captain. J.W.F. Bennett, now
of New York, will recall old days in
a between-halves radio address. Mich-
igan's 100-piece band will go through
intricate maneuvers in their honor.
"Louie"'Elbel will lead the band in a
massed rendition of the song he wrote.
There will be a luncheon in their hon-
or at noon and a reunion dinner at
night. It will be a busy day for the
oldsters of '98.
Widman's Great Run
In the hectic Chicago-Michigan
battle of 1898, Michigan was losing
until the last few minutes of play. It
was a bitter cold Thanksgiving day
and Chicago fans were set for a cele-
bration. But they( failed to take
Charlie Widman, diminutive reserve
quarterback into account and it was
Widman, who in a sensational open-
field run, won the game for the Wol-
verines. So famous did Widman's run
become that a Chicago newspaper had
a large oil painting made of the play
and presented it to the University.
Widman today is a prominent indus-
trialist in Detroit, a director and sales
manager for the Murray Body Corp.
Louis Elbel, who wrote "The Vic-

tors" recalls that, as he marched down
a street on Chicago's south side with
a handful of other Michigan under-
graduates, the words for his song
seemed to come unbidden to his lips
and by the time that miniature snake-
dance was over, the air was born.
"There was never a more enthusiastic
Michigan student than I," said Elbel
recently, "but that '98 team and that
Chicago game pushed me way up in
the clouds and all I had to do was fill
in the notes and there was 'The Vic-
tors'."
No Band In '98
There were fewer than 5,000 peo-
ple to watch the '98 Chicago-Michi-
gan struggle. The Michigan stadium
today accommodates nearly 20 times
that number. There was no band
(Continued onlPage 6)
All-Campus Golf Meet
To Be Held October 15
Golfers, take advantage of these last
few days of Indian summer to cut
those all-important few strokes off
your game for on Saturday, Oct. 15
at 1 p. m. the entrants in the Annual
All-Campus Golf Tournament will tee
off at the University Golf course.
The tournament consisting of 18
holes of medal play will be open to all
uhdergraduataes who have not won
varsity "M's" or varsity letters in golf
at any other college or university. To
the winner of the contest will go a
gold medal and the semi-finalists will
receive ribbons.
The tournament will be played re-
gardless of weather conditions and the
regular greens fee of 50 cents will be
charged. Entries may be made by
signing on the list posted in the lobby
of the I-M building and contestants
will be notified concerning their op-
ponents and the tee-off time.

i

passes at crucial moments last Satur-
day nullified whatever advantages
the 13 completed State aerials might
have given them.
Slightly ailing after Saturday's
game were halfback Norm Purucker,
fullback Wally Hook and end John
Nicholson, but all were in uniform
and apparently will be ready to go
tomorrow.
The Monday workout marked the
return of Elmer Gedeon to his end
post for the first time since Sept. 14,
while Joe Savilla who had been out
with a split cheek, returned to a sec-
ond-string tackle post.

:i

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Taught daily, 10 to 10.
Terrace Garden Studio
2dFloor. uerth The-
ater Bldg. Phone 9695.
'U

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