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February 26, 1939 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

New

York And San Francisco

Fairs

To

Draw

100,000,000

Gala Exposition
Features World
Of Tomorrow
Reduced Fares And Better
Hotel Accommodations
Offered To Travelers
By N. BARNEY SCHORR
The eyes and hopes of the world
turn to 1216 acres of reclaimed lanp
on Flushing Bay, Long Island April
30 for the greatest exposition of cul-
ture and achievement of modern
times-the World's Fair 1939-de-

General Motors 'Highways Of Tomorrow' Exhibit

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picting the World of Tomorrow.
An estimated 60,000,000 will visit
this wonder city raised from a form-
er ash dump and swamp at arcost of
$155,000,000. Reduced rail fares, in-
creased hotel accommodations and
highly-geared motor routes have all
been offered to make the Fair avail-
able to all.
Phases Of Living Depicted
Exhibit zones will relate the theme
of the Fair-Building the World of
Tomorrow-to various phases of liv-'
ing. World industry will be repre-
sented in individual buildings and in
special exhibits. Twenty-five nations
will possess their own pavilions, at
least 38 others will display their pro-
ducts in structures comprising the
Hall of Nations. An amusement zone
of 280 acres, encircling the irregular
oval of Meadow Lake, will provide
fun and relaxation in full measure.
Vast halls will display every aspect
of life in the past, of today and to-
morrow. On every side will be
stretches of lawn, trees, flowers, foun-
tains, cascades to enhance the beauty
of the spectacle.
Trylon And Perisphere
Subordinating even the principal'
structures will be the prodigious di-'
mensions of the Fair's own symbol,
its objective center of gravity-the'
Trylon and Perisphere. The Trylon
is a slender shaft of three sides which
rises-700 feet to beggar the 555 feet '
five inches of the Washington Mon-
ument. It is joined near its base to
the Perisphere, a hollow ball with a
diameter of 200 feet.'
The Fair will be divided into 14
major sections, each one significant
to modern life. They are: Govern-'
ment, Production, Transportation,
Communication, Distribution, Busi-
ness Systems, Shelter, Clothing and
Cosmetics, Sustenance, Health and
Public Welfare, Education, Recrea-
tion, Arts and Religion. In more
general outline three large areas are1
defined. These are the exhibits, pre-
sented by the Fair and private in-
dustry; government, which includes'
the United States Federal Building,
foreign participation and the displays
of States and possessions of the
Union; and the Amusement Zone.t
For amusement the Fair will rep-
SPOT ESSF L E T

Island Paradise
Is Man-Made
At Golden Gate
Bridges, Ferries, Planes'
Will Transport Tourists
To Artistic Buildings
By LEONARD SCHLEIDER
Mecca of millions of people from
the far corners of the earth this year
will be San Francisco's International
Golden Gate Exposition which, its
backers say, is positively the great-
est entertainment and educational at-
traction of any century.
Treasure Island Opened
Without benefit of Grover Whalen,
genuinely artistic Treasure Island
was opened to a waiting world last
Saturday by Michigan alumnus Cul-
bert Olson, governor of the Sunshine
State, using a bejeweled key.
The Pageant of the Pacific, situat-
ed on a man-made island in San
Francisco Bay beneath the Golden
Gate Bridge, is a panorama of exotic
towers, lagoons and colorful build-
ings. Murals, bas-reliefs and olive
trees lend enchantment to the scene.
Foreign Exhibits Included
Exhibits include those of the Brit-
ish Empire, Hawaii, South American
republics, France and the Nether-
lands. An American Indian exhibit
dominates the U.S. Federal building.
Conspicuous on the Gayway, amuse-
ment area, are the Wine Temple,
Streets of all Nations and Sally
Rand's Nude Ranch.

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igan nor'wester, this account should
fairly throb with longing for thej
sunny spots of the South. A South-
erner looks at the South-from a
vantage point as chilling as a debu-
tant's hauteur. This is wander-
lust in reverse.
Kentucky, Gateway To Dixie
One of the first Southern spots
through which the traveler from
Michigan must pass is Kentucky.I
This is introduced not so much be-
cause it is home to the author, ,but
because it is the Gateway to Dixie.
A stay in the bluegrass, under the
alcoholic aura of mint juleps, close
to the beat of thoroughbred hooves,,
will aid in conditioning the Northern.
traveler to the Southern viewpoint.-
In search of the sun, the traveler
presses on across the Mason-Dixon
line, into the land of cotton fields,x
sharecroppers, stately colonial homes
and Negro spirituals. He may turn.

Mardis Gras of New Orleans is over,
the traveler will probably turn to
Florida, where every square mile
seemingly contains some attraction.
St. Augustine Of Interest
Perhaps the chief point of interest
in the north of the state is the old
Spanish fort at St. Augustine, built
like a medieval European castle and
replete with antique cannon, dun-
geons and a moat. For nature-lovers,
there is, near Jacksonville, an alliga-
tor farm where thousands of the
reptiles compete for a place in the
sun.
Mecca for south-bound tourists is,
of course, Miami. Most travelers
reach it via the Atlantic Coast, but
an interesting variation is along the
Tamiami Trail through the E\ r-
glades and the reservations of the
Seminole Indians. After one reaches
Miami, the range of activities is as
broad as the pocketbook.

Southern Patriarch Scans Dixie,
Land Of Sun, Song And Beaches
By COLONEL H. HAUFLER ' to the "deep South" of Louisiana,
Written in a fit of nostalgia in- proud of its traditions of noble creoles
spired by a harsher than usual Mich- and pretty quadroons. But since the

r

'resent the handiwork of some of the
foremost geniuses in the world of
theatre, radio and cinema dancers
will' glide on many floors, among
them, "The Winter Wonderland," a
vast cabaret in Alpine settings of
snow, ice and glacier. In "Old New
York," "Steve Brodie" will jump six
times nightly from the "Brooklyn
Bridge," "tear jerkers" will be sung,
there will be handlebar mustaches
and Floradora Girls who will shock
Mayor La Guardia.
The Fair will stress education as
the single factor which separates
civilization from catastrophe. With
Dr. Harry Woodburn Chase Chan-
cellor of New York University as its
chairman, the Fair's Department of
Education will plan and supervise
elaborate exhibits among them "The
School of Tomorrow," with demon-
stration classes to be studied by visit-
ors. The emotional and practical
problems of childhood, adolescence
and maturity-all these will be stud-
ied in respect to their influence on
citizenship.
American Exhibits Pretentious
Of American exhibits, the U.S. Fed-
eral Building will be one of most pre-
tentious. It will include exhibits of
the executive, judicial and legisla-
tive branches of the American gov-
ernment. Two towers representing
the judiciary and legislature will be
joined by a semi-circular structure,
the symbol of executive government,
which will be faced with 13 columns
representing the Union's original
states.
Latest reports. from the East re-
port that the Fair is three weeks'
ahead of schedule and That old
Gotham is already flying the ban-
ners of welcome and huzzah in antici-
pation of the many visitors who will
pass through the Turnstiles of To-
morrow.

National Parks

I

Bid Welcome
To Travelers
By WILLIAM ELMER
To repeat a rather trite phrasing:
"Why go abroad when we have some
of the world's most beautiful scenic
spots in the great national parks of
the west?" Moreover, out there is
calm, quietude and aside from a few
wild beasts, there is no fear of invad-
ing armies or dictators.
A whole summer could be spent in
Yellowstone without seeing every-
thing thoroughly, but specially ar-
ranged tours afford the tourist a visit
to some of the more famous beauties
in three or four days. Of course, it is
possible to drive your own car through
and it is also possible to pitch a tent
or put up at one of the lodges or
hotels and spend as much time as
one wishes.N
None of our great parks offers more
in interest and recreation. Yellow-
stone is a show unique on the Ameri-
can continent.
But while the northwest has its
geysers and hot springs, the canyons
of the southwest are not equalled
anywhere in the world for their
rugged beauty, their rainbow hued
massiveness, or grotesque formations.
Zion, Bryce and Grand Canyon Na-
tional Parks are literally a fairyland
of color, etched and chiseled and cut
by beauty-creating genius of erosion
into color-saturated rock layers.
Rocky Mountain National Park in
Colorado, the land of snow-capped
peaks, miles above sea.level, offers a
real healthfully invigorating vaca-
tion for the city-weary or the class-
weary student.
Yosemite National Park in Cali-
fornia is chiefly remarkable as a
huge valley carved years ago by gla-
ciers from the granite sides of the
Sierras. Here is found the highest
falls in the world, Yosemite Falls,
tumbling from a height of 2,565 feet.

C RUSE S
TO
BERMUDA
on the popular
Volendam
6 Days $60 tp
Sailing from New York
MARCH 11 and MARCH 18
MARCH 25 and APRIL 1
* Easter Cruise
PPRIL8 6 DAYS -$65up
2 FULL DAYS IN BERMUDA
5 Days $50up
* APRIL15 -22 -29 -
I FULL DAY IN BERMUDA
Complete entertainment program ... out-
door swimming pool... famous Holland-
America Line cuisine and service.
SHIP YOUR HOTEL THROUGHOUT
at no extra expense
CONSULT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT, or
HOLLAND -AMERICA LINE
Room 202 Book Bldg., Detroit
Offices and Agents in Principal Cities

New Horizons
Made Possible
By Freighters
You're planning an ocean trip next
summer. You'll arrange to travel first
class, perhaps; more likely tourist.
Why? Because someone told you that
was the only way to go, or because
that's the way you've always gone.
.Why not go by freighter? You grunt.
By those slow, dirty coal boxes? Nev-
er!! Have you even tried them? Evi-
dently not.
A freighter is one of the thousa:,ds
of cargo carriers that steam into every
port in the world and pick up freight
as schedules demand. They have no
set time table, adding from one to
ten ports of call to each trip after
starting. A seven day cruise is likely
to stretch into ten days, at no extra
expense to the passenger.
Smaller freighters carry from two
to a dozen passengers. Larger cargo
liners sometimes have special decks
for passengers and carry from 75 to
100 or more. Cost of a freighter trip
in many instances is less than the
cost of living at home for the same

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The Michigan Daily presents its
first travel supplement for 1939,
the early appearance of which is
a reminder that reservations for
trips during spring and summer
vacations should be made as early
as possible.
On these two pages are a few
suggestions on where to go and
how to get there, what to look for
and what to keep away from. Take
this paper with you on your travels
and you can't go wrong.

TRAVEL.
WARDROBE
TRUNKS
If you're planning on going
away now or in the near fu-
ture-here's the answer to
your luggage problem. They
are right from stock. Regu-
lar $32.50 standard wardrobe
trunk for $24.95. Only 12 in
stock.

Wilkinson Luggage Shop
MAIN STREET
3A".d 4TO ALL

EUROPE

PRESIDENT HARDING
MANHATTAN

WASHINGTON
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT

_1

length of time. Clothes present no
problem, informality being the key-
tote. On the larger liners, the state-
rooms, more often as not, are large,
outside cabins equipped with regular
beds.
Not only is a freighter as clean as
an ocean liner, but is as fast and
sometimes faster. The cheapest
freighter to South Africa makes bet-
ter time than the cruise liners. One
freight line does passenger boat time
to and from Europe regularly.
Cooperative History Tolde
The evolution of the Michigan Wol-
verine, student cooperative, from a
group serving 25 or 30 students in the
basement of Lane Hall in 1932 .to a
well established organization in 1938
providing board for 800 people is
traced in the fourth issue of the
Washtenaw Progressive published by
progressive groups in Washtenaw
county.

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Also
POPULAR ONE-CLASS SHIPS
UNITED STATES LINES:
To LONDON and LIVERPOOL
$105 and Up One Way
AMERICAN SCANTIC LINE:
One Class Ships to Baltic Ports
PANAMA PACIFIC LINE:
New York to California
Through the Panama Canal
American Republics Line
CRUISES TO SOUTH AMERICA
38 Days - $410 and up
See your local agent
or
UNITE D STA TES LIN ES
1255 Washington Blvd. Detroit, Mich.
Keep a Permanent Record of
Your Vacation Trip with MOVIES

-

Stein Bloch ENSEMBLES
FOR COUNTRY WEAR as well as daily use, Safi el
Bush introduce the "Fairway Ensemble."
Smart jacket with contrasting or harmonizing

9

GOING
P
L
A
E
S
in

4

tr iousers.

Coats $16.50 to $30.00, 'Trousers

$6.00 to $12.50.

* NUNN-BUSH ankle-
fashioned shoes. All the
intriguing, new Spring
styles designed to express

Individuality.

Priced

I

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,.

COMPLETE - YEAR AROUND

1:

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TRAVEL SERVICE
OFFICIAL AGENTS of ALL AIR, BUS, and
Steamship Lines, Tour Comnpanies and Hotels

F,

s
C
(

from $8.50 to $11.50.
Others from $5.85.
5HIMrs in smart colors for
Spring. New collar styles.
[ashioned to give an air of
:asual correctness. Priced at
$2.00, $2.50, and $3.00.

7 s low a
$3.5

II

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